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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by John 3 17 View Post
    I remember the silence of no airplanes overhead for weeks while all flights were grounded. Eery. I remember being happy and nervous when they were heard flying again.
    I really have no personal connection to share, being so far away in Ohio and fortunately not knowing anyone in New York, but that comment reminded me that that day after all the planes had been grounded (with the t.v. on all day and the windows open), later in the day I heard what was definitely a plane. I ran outside to look (not like they were going to crash into a middle class neighborhood or something). Way, way, way up, I saw and heard a big white plane going very, very fast. (A person driving down my street right then actually stopped the car and got out and looked.) We didn't know what to think. Later, a friend, who had been sent home earlier from Wright Patterson AFB, said that it was a decoy for the President's plane flying back from whatever bunker he was in on the way back to DC. Cool, huh?

    Plus all day and into the night, Air Force helicopters flew a continuous path all around the Dayton area. I'd be on the phone with my mom 10 minutes away and hear the helicopter and then a couple minutes later she would hear it overhead. Comforting and scary at the same time.

  2. #22
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    This is one of the stories that has stayed with me since 2001. Such a series of tragic coincidences.
    To think that fun is simple fun, while earnest things are earnest, proves all too plain that neither one thou truthfully discernest.

  3. #23

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    UMBS Go Blue, your post made me cry. I am glad you are still with us.

    I am from Brooklyn and you could see the NYC skyline from where I grew up. I haven't lived there for many years, but my aunt (the same one who's in the hospital now) lives there and I remember she went down to the water and watched that morning. I was home from work that day sick with some sort of bug. I hadn't had much sleep the night before and I'd gotten up and turned on the TV and was dozing on the couch. I woke up to scenes on TV of the towers burning and I couldn't figure out what was going on. I thought it must be a movie. I don't know how long it took before my brain could process what was going on. I felt so sick at the time that it didn't really sink in.

    A cousin of mine lived on the upper west side and she was okay. I remember the relief when we found that out.

    And flight 93.... I cannot imagine being in that situation, knowing I was going to die.... and having the courage to fight back the way those heroes did.

    I have not watched any of the ceremonies... too hard.

  4. #24
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    I had changed jobs a year before my then-employer decided to move to the Towers from Midtown, purely because of the commute. I probably would have stayed with them if I'd known they were going to relocate since I could get to the WTC in less than an hour, as opposed to the 2-hour commute to midtown.

    On 9/11, there was an early-morning manager's meeting. Dozens of my colleagues were killed instantly by the first plane, although I didn't find out for a few weeks. I was on the company's memorial website last night and it struck me that everyone that died were people who just got up and went to work that day - secretaries, stockbrokers, IT crews.

    On 9/11, my then-11 yo daughter was at school and I was home with my toddlers. I went to turn the news off when DH stopped me, saying "I think they said a plane just hit the WTC." Went downstairs and turned on the TV to see footage of the first tower. As I was watching, I saw an explosion erupt from the second tower, and seconds later, I heard the boom in real life. The crash was so loud, I heard it 10 miles away at my house. We called the school, which was even closer, and they told us to wait before trying to pick up because the roads needed to stay open for emergency vehicles. The view from the school an short time later was horrifying - you could clearly see both towers afire, the plumes of acrid smoke that permeated everything for weeks.

    My brother worked very close to the WTC. That morning, he looked out his office window to see papers flying and wondered what the ticker-tape parade was for today. What he was seeing were documents and memos that had literally been blown apart by the planes hitting offices. He locked down the servers and hoofed it to the SI Ferry terminal, managing to get on the last ferry out of Manhattan before the first collapse. I had goosebumps as he told the story of the dustcloud chasing the ferry across the harbor.

    People walked for miles and miles because mass transit wasn't running. Bridges and tunnels were closed, so you couldn't go anywhere by car, pedestrians were hurried across in small groups, for fear of another plane. (My niece was stranded, but safe, in NJ and couldn't get back home because of closures for several days.) Stores and gas stations were closed.

    Yet, there are things that people did for which we are eternally grateful.


    There are a lot of ways out of NYC and a lot of brave people. The ferries carried many people to safety and brought in rescue crews and equipment to Manhattan. People used their own cars to shuttle pedestrians to their next crossing on their long walk home.

    Emergency shelters and strangers cared for those displaced and stranded. People opened their doors to travelers and took them in until they could find their way home. They gave them clothing, food and shelter.

    First-responders, many volunteers, came with equipment and manpower to not only "work the heap," but to fill our firehouses and police stations, keeping the rest of NYC safe from other dangers. It was odd to see yellow fire engines in the spot where our traditional red ones belonged.

    Timing is everything: many people had taken the morning or day off for various reasons, including taking their kids to school, stopping to talk to a friend, and last-minute changes of plans. Some people just missed their plane/bus/train/ferry and were running late; others had changed flight reservations for one reason or another. The toll would have been much higher had the first plane hit an hour or two later.

    NY'ers are brave, with excellent "street smarts." A church friend's office was evacuated from the second tower because of the first plane strike on the other building. His manager wanted everyone to go back inside to work since that fire wouldn't affect them, in his opinion. My friend refused and argued with the guy. As the cops stepped in to prevent the pending fistfight, the second plane struck. Had they been in the building... I know of ten other stories, where people just thought on their feet and got themselves, and others, out of harms' way.

    NYC and the Port Authority had prepared emergency plans, so while their illustrious "bunker" was useless under Building 7, they were able to scramble and get things under control elsewhere.
    Last edited by FigureSpins; 09-11-2011 at 02:45 PM.

  5. #25
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    One thing that I will always remember about September 11, 2001, was that the weather was just stunningly beautiful that morning. It was a clear, perfectly blue sky, just a few fluffy white clouds, no humidity, a light refreshing breeze, just absolutely gorgeous.....and then the city descended into hell........

    The camaraderie displayed by 8 million strangers on that day and the days that followed was truly extraordinary. I also will always be grateful for the outpouring of compassion from across the globe.
    Last edited by Fergus; 09-11-2011 at 02:57 PM.

  6. #26
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    It was a beautiful morning and it was eerie that afternoon, thinking about the horrors across the harbor and seeing that blue sky.

  7. #27
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    How wide is Governor Christie?
    To think that fun is simple fun, while earnest things are earnest, proves all too plain that neither one thou truthfully discernest.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by allezfred View Post
    This is one of the stories that has stayed with me since 2001. Such a series of tragic coincidences.
    So sad.

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    God Bless the families and those who lost friends and loved one on this day. 10:28am EST, the North Tower collapsed.
    "“My bronze feels like gold,” said the bronze medalist Carolina Kostner

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by allezfred View Post
    How wide is Governor Christie?
    About the width of Teaneck.
    3539 and counting.

    Slightly Wounding Banana list cont: MacMadame.

  11. #31
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    I was in an information systems planning meeting in one of the meeting rooms of a Sheraton hotel about a mile from my home just outside Richmond, VA - the company's offices were about 5 miles away, but they wanted to have this meeting offsite so that we wouldn't be distracted by office events (ironic indeed).

    We were just getting ready for our second day of planning when someone came into the meeting room and announced that something had hit the first WTC tower. I remember people commenting that this was a very bad joke when the person said that no, the TV news was announcing it.

    We went out to the hotel lobby and several of us watched the news coverage on the hotel lounge's TV - by that time, the second plane had hit the other tower. We all watched for a while in a mixture of shock and horror, trying like everyone else to make sense of what was happening. After what seemed like an hour or so, the rest of the day's meetings were cancelled, and we got word that our company was closing the office for the day.

    I drove the short distance back to my home. When I got home, I found my companion watching the coverage. He had been up very late the night before and was still asleep when everything started. When he turned on the TV upon awakening, he thought at first that he was seeing a very strange TV movie or documentary showing what if we were attacked. With everything else going on, I had forgotten that it was also his birthday.

    Like the rest of the people posting here, what happened that day, whether being literally in the midst of the horror in NYC or at varying distances from it, changed all of our lives in one way or another. This may seem petty or selfish, and I apologize if it does, but the one bright spot on that day was Bob's birthday, but even in following years, it wasn't celebrated without remembering all the losses that occurred in 2001.

    He died 3 years ago this summer, 4 weeks before his 61st birthday. So I remember him and his life today, as well as all the victims and families and friends of those who left us on the 11th of September in 2001.

  12. #32
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    Dame Judi Dench reading "Remember" by Christina Rossetti in London.
    To think that fun is simple fun, while earnest things are earnest, proves all too plain that neither one thou truthfully discernest.

  13. #33
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    I was at my desk here in SE Michigan, just checking my email, when Mike Bradley who was then working for WNIC in Detroit came on the air and said thet a small plane had hit the World Trade Center in New York. Now, I didn't really think that much about it - I had vaguely heard of the World Trade Center, but it didn't sound like it was too much of a big thing. Then he came on the radio again, and said that another plane had hit the second tower of the World Trade Center, and that these were large passenger planes, not small planes.

    We all went into the break room and turned on CNN. We watched in disbelief as first one, then the other tower fell. We were horrified hearing about the Pentagon and the plane in Pennsylvania. Working for a goverment, we were concerned about being a target of some sort.

    We decided to close our offices and I went to the elementary school to get my son out of school early. Irrational, I know, but you want people close to you. They wouldn't let me get him out of school, which I remember made me very angry - and under normal conditions I probably would have read them the riot act - but I accepted it and went home. I live across the street from the school.

    So I sat on the couch in my living room by myself and just watched things unfold on the tv. It reminded me of the day when I sat at home (I was in college at the time and doing homework) and watched Oklahoma City unfold. I remember calling my mother in law in Pennsylvania to make sure family there was ok.

    In the days following, I remember days and days of clear blue skies. It has often been bright blue on September 11th in the past ten years, and I'm always kind of glad when it is cloudy like it is here today. I remember the fighter jets zooming over head. I remember trying to give blood and being told I couldn't because I had lived on the UK (because of Mad Cow disease), and the Sheriffs who had gone to New York to help coming back with stories of great bravery and horrible sadness. I remember everyone having one or two American flags on their cars and people wearing American flags on their business clothes for months and months following. I remember a colleague telling us how he was in a hotel in DC and saw a low flying plane pass his hotel window, and then hearing the hit on the Pentagon, and how they had to try to get back home.

    My son, who was six when it happened, says he remembers it. It was interesting in the days following to watch him cope with what had happened. There weren't nightmares or anything, but in the first days there were a lot of drawings of planes flying into buildings. Then he switched to drawing lots of American flags. They were everywhere when he drew. The last one I remember is that he drew a big boot and an American flag and wrote one of the verses from that Toby Keith song (I was tempted to send it to the singer).

    My husband's nephew was in the Navy at the time and of course, there were worries about him. He ended up serving on board in the Persion Gulf, and later in Afghanistan.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by John 3 17 View Post

    I remember the silence of no airplanes overhead for weeks while all flights were grounded. Eery. I remember being happy and nervous when they were heard flying again.
    I was 12 at the time. My dad took me outside around 5 PM that night and told me to look up at the sky. He said there will never be a time in your life that there won't be any planes in the sky. I was young, but I was old enough to understand what was going on.

    At school, I remember coming back from first period PE to history. I walked in with my best friend and my teacher had the television turned on, and there was a picture of the Pentagon. My first thought was that there had a been a bomb threat - then they showed the flames, the smoke, then the WTC. It was a blur that first hour.

    A couple hours on, a friend and I snuck out of class to go watch the news at the library since many of the teachers had been told not to let us watch. We normally would have been kicked out and admonished for skipping, but no one cared, and I think the librarians knew that whatever we were suppose to be learning in our classes was irrelevant that day. I can even remember walking home - I only lived a half-mile away - and the weather was just perfect. It was probably 85 degrees (cool for Texas), sunny, clear and the sun had that distance that is reminiscent of early fall. Both of my parents were already home, which never happened. I opened the door and they were sitting on the couch, just watching the news. We did that the whole night.

    I will never, EVER, forget the moment when a CNN journalist was interviewing a Russian immigrant and her child who lived in an apartment near the WTC. They were in downtown Manhattan, and it was utter chaos. Then there was a huge collapse of whatever was remaining of the North Tower, I think, and all this debris was flying towards them and people were running and screaming. The anchor threw down her microphone and grabbed the woman and screamed "Your baby!" and they ran to reach cover, with the screen being cut off to the CNN station.

    I just know at that point there was no estimate of how many were dead. It was chaos, and no one knew anything. It was so scary, and all I could think of were all of those families and friends at home, trying to call their loved ones, and not knowing....
    Last edited by IceJunkie; 09-11-2011 at 06:39 PM.

  15. #35

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    I had awakened and switched on the television seconds before the first plane struck.
    My mother was already getting ready for work in the other end of the house.
    I hurried to let her know what had happened. We spent the rest of the day watching the horror on television.

    As a young woman, my mother experienced another pivotal day in the World's history:
    As events unfolded, she said that our generation had just experienced it's "Pearl Harbor".
    She was correct.

  16. #36

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    I was in my office in Central New Jersey when I heard screams from the operation down the hall. All of the blinds on the windows had been drawn up and there was an unobstructed view of smoke coming out of a hole one of the World Trade Center Towers. It was being reported that a plane had struck it. My first voiced reaction was, "This has got to be terrorism", sparked by the fact that many of the fllights I had taken up to New England from NewarK airport had flown up the Hudson, directly passing the Trade Center. It felt like you could reach out and touch the Towers; no competent pilot could had accidentally flown into them. I then saw a plane go into those towers.

    I then saw a plane make a direct hit with the second tower. I couldn't watch the rest. There were people in my company who watched the towers go down. The sister-in-law of one of my colleagues had been at the Trade Center that mornign for a training course, and since they had no information about her whereabouts, they feared that she was one of the dead. Having gotten to there about an hour early, she decided to go down and get some breakfast elsewhere. As she was crossing the plaza between the two plazas, she was hit by debris from the first impact and knocked unconscious. Since she lost her purse, the hospital to which she was taken could not identify her. When she finally came to about a week later, it was only then that they could figure out who she was.

    I remember those towers going up in the early 70's and being there as a medic at an anti-Viet Nam war demonstration in Wall Street. There was a melee between the construction workers and the demonstrators, the former feeling that the latter group were being anti-patriotic. I also remember people with cracked open bleeding heads being carried down the aisles of Tinrity Church during the noon mass to the sacristy which we were using for a minor surgery.

    Both experiences left me shaken to the core.

  17. #37
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    They've gotten on to the Macs and Mcs.
    To think that fun is simple fun, while earnest things are earnest, proves all too plain that neither one thou truthfully discernest.

  18. #38
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    ...... l\__\ … … …
    . . . l\l … l
    ___ l\l … l___
    l\___\l … l___\
    \l____ … ____l …
    . .. .l\l … l
    . .. .l\l … l
    . .. .l\l … l … …
    . .. .l\l … l ……
    .. . .l\l … l … …
    .. . .l\l … l … …
    . .. .\l___l …․Remembering
    all those who lost their lives
    as a result of September 11, 2001
    & all of those whose lives were
    forever changed
    Can't skate but love to watch

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by allezfred View Post
    They've gotten on to the Macs and Mcs.
    To be sure, you'll be hearing some O's as well. RIP to them all.
    "Skating fans are not a patient bunch." Dragonlady

  20. #40
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    I was 12, and I most certainly did not fully understand the gravity of the situation.

    I remember, a week later, writing a journal entry for an English class saying that I didn't feel sad. I didn't know any of those people, I didn't quite get what had happened, and I was worried because everyone else was so upset about it and I felt I should be, too. My teacher wrote back that I didn't need to worry about not feeling sad, and that I would understand one day. I'm grateful to her. The thing that upset me most was that I knew something bigger than what I imagined had occurred and that I knew I wasn't grasping it fully, but couldn't see what I was missing.

    Of course, as I grew up, we entered a war that, by then, I knew was wrong and against the wrong faction. And I spent most of my most-formative years watching people died in Iraq for no apparent reason, and growing increasingly angry with my own country for sending all these soldiers off to die and never focusing on OBL, who was the person who masterminded it all in the first place. And feeling confused, still, because all these people on TV told me that feeling that the war was wrong and being angry with America was unpatriotic, and yet I was so sure that it was wrong and that I should be angry.

    Of course, 10 years on, I'm much older. I still feel like I'll never quite grasp the significance of what occurred that day, or in its aftermath - not until I'm much, much older than I am now. Not until it's all over and I can look back on it with a clearer head. I mostly just remember feeling endlessly confused about it all, and hoping we would go back to normal classes soon because I loved to learn. And my parents crying, and feeling alarmed because my dad never cried. And the other kids in school, who also didn't get it, crowing amongst each other, "maybe we'll be next, with all this fresh water in the Great Lakes, we'd be a prime spot for terrorism!" because to so many of us, at that age, it was a game. And the teachers yelling at us for our inability to grasp how many people had died, how horrible it all was, and my schoolmates looking chastened but confessing, in the corners of the room, that they really didn't understand.

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