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  1. #41

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    Thomas Edison State College is part of the NJ public university system. They are the distance learning/adult education part of the NJ state system. Empire State College is similar in NY State.
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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    That's why I specifically noted MD or PhD. Both take around 10 years to accomplish (5 years for a PhD if you don't have much of a life otherwise) and in the case of an MD, a boatload of debt you have to pay back. Impossible if you only have 10 working years left after you finish.

    An MA can cost some serious funds too, but at least they only take 2 years to finish so you can take advantage of the higher salary much sooner.
    10 years is the maximum time most of the universities I've seen allow someone to take for a PhD, not an average. I worked one summer scanning grievance files of students who wanted to take more time than than that.

    Most people I know seem to have finished up their PhD within 5 years (of full time study, but they all seem to have excellent lives outside of school too.)

    Don't know anything about MDs though.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    Most people I know seem to have finished up their PhD within 5 years (of full time study, but they all seem to have excellent lives outside of school too.)
    It took me 7 years. Three years of classes (not all full-time because I already had a masters), and then four years to get the dissertation written. I had a job outside of school because I needed to pay the bills, but the most progress I made on the writing were one semester when I was laid off and collecting unemployment, one semester with a fellowship, and one with a teaching assistantship. The rest of those 4 years I was so busy working and, yes, researching, I didn't get much writing done.

    Other than skating and occasionally attending skating competitions for fun, I didn't have much more of a "life." But that's me. Other classmates had marriages, etc.

  4. #44

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    So far, American Military University offers the least expensive tuition; at least 75% would be paid by the gub'mint. Of course for every semester hour I complete, I'll have to work an extra month for the feds. Egads, that's almost like being in the military! But I'm going to look at the MBA programs they are offering; there is a Transportation & Logistics MBA program that looks interesting....does anyone know about AMU?

  5. #45
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    You should check- if you are laid off, do you have to repay them?

    My company requires a 1 year commitment for every course but if THEY decide to get rid of me, I don't have to pay them back. It's only if I decide to leave them.

    (The reimbursement is also really low, a max $$ per year- not even enough to pay for 2 courses per year, just about 1.5 of them, so I'm paying a lot out of pocket- nothing close to what you are getting. I'd say for the reimbursement you are getting a 1 month per hour commitment (so 3 months for most courses) is a good deal. )

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by agalisgv View Post
    At research universities in the US, two classes per term is the norm in the liberal arts/social sciences. Schools on quarter systems will often have a 2-1-1 load.
    Did I say in my original post that I was only referring to non-US non-liberal arts profs?

    I based my statement on the workloads that I know of, which includes teachers in US universities *and* teachers in liberal arts/social sciences.
    You should never write words with numbers. Unless you're seven. Or your name is Prince. - "Weird Al" Yankovic, "Word Crimes"

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    Rex, Temple's MBA program is relatively affordable (as far as MBA programs go) and has an excellent reputation in Philadelphia. You can go to class right in Center City, and 90%+ of your classmates will be working professionals whose company is paying for part/all of their tuition. You can, IIRC, also take a couple of classes as a non-matriculated student before they make you take the GMAT.

    The downside to Temple is that their Career Services office doesn't seem to be geared toward helping MBA students find a launching pad. I'd guess most stay at their current jobs.

    You could check out Drexel, but I'm not sure how that would work if you'll be tied to your employer for a certain period afterwards. Much of their success with job placement depends on the co-op program, which I don't think you could do while working your current job.
    Drexel's MBA is $$$$. It's not worth it when a far more affordable option (Temple) is available.

    If your employer won't foot the bill, the full-time MBA program is a better value because it's less expensive than the Executive MBA program and the Executive MBA program also doesn't offer an in-state rate. But then you'd have to leave your job.

    Be aware that MBA's, like most degrees, aren't as useful as they once were, but they're just as costly.

    Whatever you do, don't consider the University of Phoenix when a decent public school (Temple) is available.

    I believe Temple offers some part-time programs.
    Last edited by Gazpacho; 04-20-2011 at 06:31 PM.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    Rex, Temple's MBA program is relatively affordable (as far as MBA programs go) and has an excellent reputation in Philadelphia. You can go to class right in Center City, and 90%+ of your classmates will be working professionals whose company is paying for part/all of their tuition. You can, IIRC, also take a couple of classes as a non-matriculated student before they make you take the GMAT.

    The downside to Temple is that their Career Services office doesn't seem to be geared toward helping MBA students find a launching pad. I'd guess most stay at their current jobs.

    You could check out Drexel, but I'm not sure how that would work if you'll be tied to your employer for a certain period afterwards. Much of their success with job placement depends on the co-op program, which I don't think you could do while working your current job.
    Temple doesn't offer military discounts .

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex View Post
    Temple doesn't offer military discounts .
    It's still better value.

    There's an information session tonight for Adult Students and Veterans: http://www.temple.edu/tucc/about/Inf...ionsatTUCC.asp. If you attend, you get your application fee waived (http://www.temple.edu/wwwpages/admissions/veterans.htm).
    Last edited by Gazpacho; 04-20-2011 at 07:08 PM.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex View Post
    Temple doesn't offer military discounts .
    Be very careful of schools that do offer military discounts. Many of them are not accredited. I run into this all the time.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  11. #51

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    Some employers won't hire MBAs if your MBA program wasn't AACSB accredited. I am seeing this become more common over time. Here is a list of AACSB accredited programs:
    https://www.aacsb.net/eweb/DynamicPa...7-0A92E98DF5C6

    Temple is AACSB.
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  12. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex View Post
    So far, American Military University offers the least expensive tuition; at least 75% would be paid by the gub'mint. Of course for every semester hour I complete, I'll have to work an extra month for the feds. Egads, that's almost like being in the military! But I'm going to look at the MBA programs they are offering; there is a Transportation & Logistics MBA program that looks interesting....does anyone know about AMU?
    American Military University is a proprietary/for profit university, like U of Phoenix and Devry/Keller. I can't advise you to get an MBA from such a school, when the bias against proprietary MBAs is so extremely strong in industry.
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  13. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    Some employers won't hire MBAs if your MBA program wasn't AACSB accredited. I am seeing this become more common over time. Here is a list of AACSB accredited programs:
    https://www.aacsb.net/eweb/DynamicPa...7-0A92E98DF5C6

    Temple is AACSB.
    At the time I attended, UConn was the only accredited program in Connecticut. We used to ding Yale all the time, as their program didn't include the basic body of knowledge subjects required for AACSB. Of course, they're accredited now.

    Getting back on topic, Rex, do you even WANT an MBA? I would think that a certificate in social media marketing might be more marketable and a whole lot cheaper.
    AceOn6, the golf loving skating fan

  14. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    It's still better value.

    There's an information session tonight for Adult Students and Veterans: http://www.temple.edu/tucc/about/Inf...ionsatTUCC.asp. If you attend, you get your application fee waived (http://www.temple.edu/wwwpages/admissions/veterans.htm).
    Crap - if I didn't have a pre-existing appointment, I'd go.

  15. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex View Post
    Crap - if I didn't have a pre-existing appointment, I'd go.
    Contact them. Sometimes if you can't attend but want to, they'll let you waive your app fee anyway. Sometimes. Worth trying. Worked for me for RPI.
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  16. #56
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    With everyone and their brother going back these days, it never hurts to stay competitive.

  17. #57
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    Go for it Rex and you are never too old.

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by overedge View Post
    Did I say in my original post that I was only referring to non-US non-liberal arts profs?

    I based my statement on the workloads that I know of, which includes teachers in US universities *and* teachers in liberal arts/social sciences.
    Offhand I don't know of a single research university in the US where that isn't the case, and I know an awful lot of them as well as teach in one. What heckles said is the standard in the US.

    Eta: I think you're confusing research institutions with universities--they're not the same
    Last edited by agalisgv; 04-21-2011 at 01:00 AM.

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    Some employers won't hire MBAs if your MBA program wasn't AACSB accredited. I am seeing this become more common over time. Here is a list of AACSB accredited programs:
    https://www.aacsb.net/eweb/DynamicPa...7-0A92E98DF5C6

    Temple is AACSB.
    Accreditation is very important when selecting a degree or certificate program. If a school's program isn't accredited by the national accrediting body for that subject or profession, it's a waste of money, imo.

    As for whether or not 46, is too old to go back to school...I'm reminded of what the late Abigail Van Buren used to advise: In two years time you'll be 48 whether or not you go back to school. Assuming that you'll continue to work until you're 65, you would still have 17 years left to recoup the financial investment. My two cents for what it's worth.
    Last edited by Civic; 04-21-2011 at 04:41 AM.

  20. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by chatsworth View Post
    With everyone and their brother going back these days, it never hurts to stay competitive.
    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz View Post
    Go for it Rex and you are never too old.
    Well, it's official! I'm going for it! I just have to find the MBA program that suits me. AMU has a Transportation & Logistics program that sounds interesting. And my EO says it's a great school for federal employees. But I am looking into Temple's MBA program as well. I have to make a decision this spring to be enrolled by the fall...to be continued.

    And yes, I have gotten lazy, and I swore I wouldn't crack open another book after going to school four nights a week while working two jobs - I was so burnt out and so relieved to be done with school. But there have been many changes, some bad, some good, and they are making me think twice about my future. Someone even told me that one of his classmates in his MBA program was 67 years old AND GOT A JOB after finishing!!! Maybe there is hope for me...

    And thanks to all the FSUers who offered their honest and considerate feedback. It has helped a great deal.
    Last edited by Rex; 04-21-2011 at 12:48 PM.

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