Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 38 of 38
  1. #21
    snarking for AZE
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    katbert greenhouse
    Posts
    30,165
    vCash
    2068
    Rep Power
    50005
    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    When I was a kid, I'd crawl under my bed whenever my parents used the coffee grinder or the vacuum. Turned out OK without any therapy. I am still really really not fond of loud noises.
    i used to go up in the treehouse when my mother vacuumed or when we had a lot of people in the house. i never liked a lot of noise or excitement in the house. i know my mother asked the doctor about it because my father thought she was stupid for asking and they fought about it. the pediatrician said, "some people can stand more excitement than others." and she wasnt allowed to bring it up again.
    I feel like I'm in a dream. But it can't be a dream because there are no boy dancers!

  2. #22
    Port de bras!!!
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ravenclaw
    Posts
    30,113
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    33169
    I didn't like big crowds either. Still don't.

    I guess we would have been both diagnosed on the spectrum these days. Let's do therapy together.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Two places! Atlanta suburbs and in the North Georgia Mountains
    Posts
    3,814
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    2089
    I'm on! I literally refuse to vacuum...something about the type of noise it is just drives me wild. I carry a lot of stress with noises. I can't go to rock concerts-I like the music if I can control the volume and how long I have to listen to it...but I'd rather do anything than go to a loud concert (except vacuum.) It is PHYSICALLY painful.

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rejecting your reality and substituting my own
    Age
    30
    Posts
    11,004
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    I didn't like big crowds either. Still don't.

    I guess we would have been both diagnosed on the spectrum these days. Let's do therapy together.
    Yeah but how much of that can be classified as a disorder and how much of that can be classified as being a plain old introvert? I think the line is where it disrupts your regular life. My bf would fit on some kind of spectrum (I think everybody would) but he's able to work and live his life avoiding things that bother him so I don't think he requires any professional help. I just have to conscientious about playing music and/or my news podcasts, and I have to remember not to invite him to events or social gatherings. It's not a huge deal.

    I recently bought him a pair of noise-cancelling headphones for long car trips though. I'm perfectly fine with driving long distances but I NEED music to keep me occupied or else I kind of go nuts. I suggested a rule that whoever drives dictates the noise level in the car.

    With awareness and technology, I think most of us are able to figure out ways to live with our personality quirks/disorders.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,907
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    2529
    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    I didn't like big crowds either. Still don't.

    I guess we would have been both diagnosed on the spectrum these days. Let's do therapy together.
    I know that you are joking. Everyone has some sensory issues to some degree, but when it starts impacting one's day to day life that it should be taken seriously. When my son was about 18 months, we joined a play group that specialized in sensory play. I didn't know about sensory integration disorder at that time. One day, all the parents were having a great time dipping their child's feet into paints and making foot prints. When I put my sons feet into the paints, he started to scream. It was a blood curdling scream of pain, not a normal reaction to finger paints. Also in the playgroup, he would not go anywhere near the sandbox or the water table. He also had/has extreme sensitive to loud noises. We had been seeing an OT about my son's gross motors delays and I mentioned about his reaction to the paints, etc and the whole sensory integration piece started to unfold. We were lucky to find an OT that specialized in sensory. He has made great gains in the last few years, but we still have a ways to go.

    ETA - An OT explained SPD to me this way. Everyone has some sensory issues, and most people have some tactile sensitives. One OT said that she cuts all the tags out of her kids' t-shirts because the tags drive her kids nuts. Another OT said that she doesn't like the texture of raisins in muffins, so she doesn't eat muffins with raisins. That is what most people do, we work around the things that bother us. Kids with SPD are so overwhelmed by their sensory issues that it impacts their day to day life.
    Last edited by algonquin; 04-11-2011 at 06:54 PM.

  6. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    618
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by algonquin View Post
    An OT explained SPD to me this way. Everyone has some sensory issues, and most people have some tactile sensitives. One OT said that she cuts all the tags out of her kids' t-shirts because the tags drive her kids nuts. Another OT said that she doesn't like the texture of raisins in muffins, so she doesn't eat muffins with raisins. That is what most people do, we work around the things that bother us. Kids with SPD are so overwhelmed by their sensory issues that it impacts their day to day life.
    Great explanation! We all have things we like and don't like - it really is how the sensory processing difficulties impact our daily life that is most important. I hate to see kids missing out on social, play, and learning opportunities because of sensory processing difficulties.

    And yes, Japanfan you are so right! Everyone's ability to tolerate sensory stimulation varies depending on the day (whether you are tired or sick), the environment, so many variables. I often give the example of the bar - when you arrive it is all fun, you love the music and the people, but as the night continues and you become tired - most people get to a point where the noise and the people become too much to handle and they may go home. Or, if I'm sick - I don't do as well in group situations as I would on another day. But, it's unlikely that you will ever go from someone who avoids sound, touch, movement to become someone who seeks sensory information (the other end of the spectrum). It's also true that sensory thresholds - tolerance or need - change over time. For example, kids seek more movement than adults and their need for this kind of sensory information tends to decrease with age. How many adults do you know who say "I used to love/be able to ride the roller coasters, now I can't go on them anymore because I just can't handle it anymore." So, there is lots of variability in a persons ability to integrate sensory information - it's part of the challenge of understanding and providing treatment. It makes parents crazy when their kids are very picky eaters (orally hypersensitive) but put everything they can in their mouth. They are using their mouth to explore, but they are in control of the sensory information. It just seems contradictory. Or, when kids do one thing on one day and another on another day, or in another situation. But, we are all like that. Some days I like blasting the music in my car. other days, it's the quiet music of the spa station all day long.

  7. #27
    Port de bras!!!
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ravenclaw
    Posts
    30,113
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    33169
    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    Yeah but how much of that can be classified as a disorder and how much of that can be classified as being a plain old introvert? I think the line is where it disrupts your regular life.
    Well, when I think about it, it does impact my daily life, to a lesser degree than a full on spectrum disorder, but nonetheless. For instance, I realized that it's probably part of the reason why I don't have a private practice. Pravite practice is a business that you have to market, you have to network, make connections, blah blah. All of these things I hate to do. I would say I am an introvert with some Asperger's features.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rejecting your reality and substituting my own
    Age
    30
    Posts
    11,004
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    Well, when I think about it, it does impact my daily life, to a lesser degree than a full on spectrum disorder, but nonetheless. For instance, I realized that it's probably part of the reason why I don't have a private practice. Pravite practice is a business that you have to market, you have to network, make connections, blah blah. All of these things I hate to do. I would say I am an introvert with some Asperger's features.
    I think all of us have aspects of our personality that affect our daily lives, so it's really up to you to judge whether you need to get professional help or not. My stutter was so bad that when I was a kid, I would not go up and ask salespeople for help or even where the bathroom was. My stutter is still bad at times, but I've gotten over the fear of asking for help when I need it. But yeah, having a stutter definitely shaped me as a person.

    I guess my question is what would professional intervention do for someone who is simply introverted? You can't change the fact that social events or crowds of people make you exhausted and/or grumpy, so you can only work around them. That would affect what you chose to do of course, but unless it was truly holding you back in a way that was negatively affecting your life in a tremendous manner, I don't think you can really do much about it.

  9. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,747
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post

    I guess my question is what would professional intervention do for someone who is simply introverted? You can't change the fact that social events or crowds of people make you exhausted and/or grumpy, so you can only work around them. That would affect what you chose to do of course, but unless it was truly holding you back in a way that was negatively affecting your life in a tremendous manner, I don't think you can really do much about it.
    If our society did not treat introversion as a flaw, this wouldn't even be a question.

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rejecting your reality and substituting my own
    Age
    30
    Posts
    11,004
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by PDilemma View Post
    If our society did not treat introversion as a flaw, this wouldn't even be a question.
    With the advent of the internet, I don't think introversion is as limiting to one's career/personal life as it used to be. I don't have to meet potential friends/partners in person (I met my wonderful and extremely introverted bf off a dating site), I don't even have to use the phone (which I hate), I can post to my heart's content instead of having to speak publicly (I write much more coherently than I can speak).

    Of course, I guess this only counts if your life leans toward more modern sensibilities.

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    618
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by PDilemma View Post
    If our society did not treat introversion as a flaw, this wouldn't even be a question.
    I have to say, I agree. We all have some aspects of introversion in our personalities. I consider myself right in the middle of the scale - I'm an extroverted people person but I recharge by having time to myself. Although I work in a people focused profession, I would NEVER want to open a private practice and have to network, make connections, etc... it's just not my thing. There are many people who choose jobs based on the fact that they do not have to deal with people - but they don't have Aspergers/Autism. IMO, it only becomes a problem when you need to interact with people/want to interact with people - yet still find it very difficult. And I must say, we have become a society so focused on labels that sometimes I think we are too quick to start analyzing what are the ends of a normal spectrum - and labeling them as something else. This is often the case with sensory processing difficulties. I remember once, a daycare was so concerned that a child would not walk in the stones at the play structure. I didn't think it was a problem, but mom summed it up when she said "What's the big deal, I hate walking with a stone in my shoe. Why should she have to do that!" Just my opinion...

  12. #32

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Age
    34
    Posts
    12,783
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    35722
    I own my own business (in the field of special needs), am an introvert and have SI issues. I don't really do any big group marketing, instead I meet individuals (like people on learning support teams at schools, clients) who market for me. My business is very small, and almost all of my clients come from word of mouth. Aside from my website, and business cards, I haven't paid for any marketing. There are always ways to adapt, but I also think it's important for me to be part of the community that I am trying to educate - I don't just want people to tolerate others with special needs, I want them to accept them, and that means compromise. It's not just those with special needs who needs to adapt, the community also needs to adapt to accept those with special needs.

    Bailey, your labelling comment is why Aspergers and high functioning autism are not yet separated in DSM. Though it will probably will be (maybe not HFA), it's a discussion I have a lot. Differentiating between HFA, Asperger's and mild autism is already hard enough...I don't see the point. I work with the problems rather than the labels, but I really feel for the parents and kids who have to deal with the labels here - getting into a school with a Asperger's label is a lot easier than with an ASD label (HFA or not), which to me is ridiculous.

  13. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rejecting your reality and substituting my own
    Age
    30
    Posts
    11,004
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Speaking introversion and Autism, this made me go hmm.

    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/...ion-and-autism

    It argues that introversion and extroversion are not opposites, that they're actually completely different things and that introversion could be the low end of the autism scale.

  14. #34
    Port de bras!!!
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ravenclaw
    Posts
    30,113
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    33169
    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post

    It argues that introversion and extroversion are not opposites, that they're actually completely different things and that introversion could be the low end of the autism scale.
    Interesting article. The continuum theory makes sense to me.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  15. #35

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Age
    55
    Posts
    12,706
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11163
    Quote Originally Posted by Angelskates View Post
    I own my own business (in the field of special needs), am an introvert and have SI issues. I don't really do any big group marketing, instead I meet individuals (like people on learning support teams at schools, clients) who market for me. My business is very small, and almost all of my clients come from word of mouth. Aside from my website, and business cards, I haven't paid for any marketing.
    I too own my own business and have SI issues. Now that I've become used to working at home in a big, bright, sunny office I find I've become more sensitive to stimulation I find negative, such as the energy in shopping malls and big box stores. If I'm tired and stressed I'm careful about things like driving in rush hour and I'll notice that the people in Superstore (one of Canada's worst big box stores) have a green tinge to them due to the lightening in there. . .

    To the contrary, I'll get a real pleasant feeling of bliss walking through a beautiful setting on a glorious day. It's almost an altered reality,

    I basically have a strong vibrational sensitivity and if I were young, who knows, maybe I'd be diagnosed as autistic? I remember reading about an autistic who fell in love with street lamps and I could totally understand that.

    For instance, I realized that it's probably part of the reason why I don't have a private practice. Pravite practice is a business that you have to market, you have to network, make connections, blah blah. All of these things I hate to do. I would say I am an introvert with some Asperger's features.
    I've attended a few networking events where we had to introduce our business. I find it terrifying and unpleasant to do, but pushed myself to go because I'm trying to expand my business. The last group I attended quickly developed a new-age group-think orientation and I really wanted to run away swiftly when the featured speaker gave her law-of-attraction pep talk. . .

    Plus, I have trouble relating in groups of people (FSUers being the exception . The whole idea of mingling confuses me. Part of that is probably being a loner as well as an introvert. I'm sure there is some disorder for that.

  16. #36

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Canada baby!
    Age
    38
    Posts
    7,591
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    3317
    I am ironically going to be talking to my doc about this very thing next month about my son. Thanks for posting this thread because I have learned a lot!!
    ~I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it.~ (Charles R. Swindoll)

  17. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    667
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    I hope the tests and results help your grandson Holley Colmes.

    But I have to say, I think that psychiatric diagnoses are going a bit too far. There are so many mental disorders out there and they inevitably reconstitute and reflect perceptions and assumptions regarding what is normal. Pretty much anyone can go to a psychiatrist with any complaint and receive a diagnosis for something.

    Isn't is possible that some people are just more sensitive to stimulation than others? And that maybe it is the one's who aren't so sensitive who have the problem? Urban environments today overload people with stimulation - there is traffic, overcrowded transit, big box stores and shopping malls flooded with echoes and artificial light. Tons of jarring, in-your face unpleasant stimulation that people learn to shut out in order to cope.

    That could possibly be called 'sensory blocking disorder' or 'sensory avoiding disorder' or some such term. And in desensitizing a child's natural sensory awareness and responses, we could be suppressing an important natural gift - the quality that makes people such as artists and healers good at what they do
    Great post. I will also join in and hope that all is ok for the 3 y.o. but wonder why the parent would put forth the time and money to put that young of a child through all of that testing if he is basically ok. I understand having some concerns and looking into it, but wonder who is paying for all of this testing and sometimes think it stresses the child and family out beyond what is needed. I am 100% ALL for early intervention that is for sure but agree that if you try hard enough most kids could end up with some diagnosis. Seems anyone with differences ends up with a label, especially one on the autism spectrum. Way overdone in some areas.
    Having said that, blessings to all of you who work with special needs children and adults and blessings to HC for being a caring grandmother.

  18. #38

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Two places! Atlanta suburbs and in the North Georgia Mountains
    Posts
    3,814
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    2089
    Thanks for your concern, Smileyskates. The "testing" itself is actually more like a playdate than something awful. I think he just interacts with other kids and some adults in a special setting while being observed. I will find out tomorrow-the test was supposed to be last Monday but is now tomorrow. I'll post what it consists of if you're interested. It isn't cheap, though. But, my daughter's insurance (which is her husband's company's insurance) does pay for most of it. My daughter and her husband will pick up the rest of the cost.

    I think the issue is that he isn't totally "ok." He is very stressed in certain situations and has "meltdowns" when he can't handle things and these meltdowns are not appropriate for his age. It doesn't happen all the time, and he is a happy kid in general when he's at home. But his teachers have recommended that he be tested. Like I have read above, treatments can be devised to relieve his stress. We just don't want him going to kindergarden and having a lot of problems. Let's take care of them now if we can.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •