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  1. #41

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    That apartment is totally nice! I don't see the problem at all. I'd live there in a heartbeat if I could live in that UWS location that cheaply.

  2. #42

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    I also wonder how much she is spending on things like eating out and laundry. I realize a lot of people have to go to laundromats in NYC but most people can at least attempt to cook something instead of eating out for every meal.
    -Brian
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  3. #43
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    I've been forced to learn the New York City Building Code like Rain Man (says he who is getting ready to bust through the roof and build a roof deck, plus move load-bearing structural walls ), and there's no way this is legal.

    I suspect this is an old conversion. But even with new work, architects can often "self-certify" plans, and all kinds of interesting things happen. Not that we're building an illegal bedroom or anything. Hey, at least ours has 7'2" ceiling height, which is a lot closer to the required 8' than in the video.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigB08822 View Post
    I also wonder how much she is spending on things like eating out and laundry. I realize a lot of people have to go to laundromats in NYC but most people can at least attempt to cook something instead of eating out for every meal.
    She has a fridge, a toaster over and an electric pot - you can make a lot of meals with that combo. Plus, I'd guess that you can buy meals out as cheaply as you can cook them in NYC. Groceries are cheaper in major metropolitan center and the bigger the city, the more the markets, food stalls/street ventors, and cheap take-out options.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    I've been forced to learn the New York City Building Code like Rain Man (says he who is getting ready to bust through the roof and build a roof deck, plus move load-bearing structural walls ), and there's no way this is legal.

    I suspect this is an old conversion. But even with new work, architects can often "self-certify" plans, and all kinds of interesting things happen. Not that we're building an illegal bedroom or anything. Hey, at least ours has 7'2" ceiling height, which is a lot closer to the required 8' than in the video.
    I found a number of articles online about landlords converting SROs into "apartments" so they could get rid of old rent controlled properties and raise the rent to market value. They got around a number of code requirements in a variety of creative ways - the articles indicate that there were many more illegal conversions than legal ones.
    I think I will have a snack and take a nap before I eat and go to sleep.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by nubka View Post
    It must be freeing, not being encumbered by lots of stuff...
    I wonder if it's freeing for her uncle and mother to have her store her stuff at their houses? For someone who is promoting that she doesn't need much stuff and that this tiny apartment meets her needs, it really doesn't because she has to store her excess stuff at two other houses (and she has a studio). We really have no idea how much stuff she really has.

    Most people could live with less stuff on a day to day basis - I have my winter clothes stored at the top of my wardrobes for example, but ultimately, she does "need" that stuff, otherwise she would have thrown it out. Most people could condense their stuff by quite a lot I would think, if they had two houses available to store things for them.

  7. #47
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    Meow!
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  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by VIETgrlTerifa View Post
    Meow!
    Why? Articles often only include the most dramatic information - in this case, the size of the apartment. I'm sure I couldn't live in such a confined space, but I think people reading into the article that "wow, she's really stuff-free, how great! It must be so freeing!" is weird to me, she has stuff stored at her uncle and mum's place.

  9. #49
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    I could probably live in there, but to my advantage I'm only 5'1 and weigh less than 95 pounds so i can pretty much fit everywhere. Her kitchen of sorts is kind of cluttered with plastic plates. If I were her, there's kinds of tupperware that can be staked on top of eachother in such a way that you can have a lot of plates and stuff that can fit in a small space. The bed is kind of too high in the ceiling but I've already slept in places like that and I could get along okay.

    She should have found a better way to stake her off season clothes which gives a cluttering feel to the place, like create a drawer under her bed. The most logical thing to do would be to dump most of the off-season clothes at the studio or parents house and that way she could have much more space.

    I've used a tiny 10 dollar electric pot for over a year now and you can cook all kinds of stuff with it, what I really suffered from was lack of a blender. Having an oven is nice to make stuff like lasagna, pizza and cakes, but if you're going to stay on the cheap and cook for 1, the pot is fine for most stuff. You can wash your own clothes by hand, it's not that hard really and it takes about 40 minutes to wash a weeks worth of clothes. You just need a large bucket and a place with warm water, dump detergent on it, mix the clothes with your hand for 2 minutes and remove them. Dump the water, rinse twice and the clothes are ready to hang somewhere. Her apartment has little space to hang clothes though.

    For Manhattan the rent is very competitive, but with that kind of cash I could save 10 months of rent, buy a huge piece of land in rural Mexico and in another 5 months build the first few rooms of a cool house.

  10. #50
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    I spent around two years living in a room that looked like this:
    - the entire length and between 1/2 and 3/4 of the width was taken by the bed (there was a small shelf between the bed and the wall)
    - next to the bed, there was a wardrobe and you could open the doors only partially because it was so close to the bed
    - there was a small chest of drawers between the wardrobe and the bed, it also made opening the wardrobe doors difficult
    - between the wardrobe and the doors to the room, I kept loads of unpacked boxes stacked on each other (I had nowhere to unpack the stuff); that meant the doors could only be opened very slightly

    I adapted to it very quickly without any problems and I didn't complain about it at all, given how low the rent was.

  11. #51
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    The bathroom is so cramped that Felice Cohen has to sit on her side to use the toilet.
    How does one sits on the side when using the toilet? I can't picture it.

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by orbitz View Post
    How does one sits on the side when using the toilet? I can't picture it.
    The wording is inaccurate, but if you really can't figure out what it means, she demonstrates in the video.

    I think I could live in the space itself, but I think I would find all the stuff stacked up the wall claustrophobic. I hate going into stores that have merchandise stacked up to the ceiling. Her closet gives me the heebie jeebies.

    I am feeling an extreme need to throw some stuff out now.
    Trolling dates all the way back to 397 B.C. - People began following Plato around and would make fart noises after everything he said.

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelskates View Post
    I wonder if it's freeing for her uncle and mother to have her store her stuff at their houses? For someone who is promoting that she doesn't need much stuff and that this tiny apartment meets her needs, it really doesn't because she has to store her excess stuff at two other houses (and she has a studio). We really have no idea how much stuff she really has.

    Most people could live with less stuff on a day to day basis - I have my winter clothes stored at the top of my wardrobes for example, but ultimately, she does "need" that stuff, otherwise she would have thrown it out. Most people could condense their stuff by quite a lot I would think, if they had two houses available to store things for them.
    I have a couple of friends who are very into the minimalist living/small house movement. In general, my opinion on the subject is "each to their own." Living in such a tiny space or with so few possessions is not for me. I need room to spread out. I have more than 100 personal possessions, but I don't find most of them a burden. I could live without if I needed to, but they're not a bother. I treasure my keepsakes, enjoy my dvd collection, old skating tapes, books, etc. I feel that my gazzillion kitchen gadgets do, in fact, make my life easier. It's also easier to own more than four plates and 3 pairs of socks. There are others that feel differently, and that's cool.

    That said, I do sometimes feel like some involved in the small home/minimalist movement are cheating a bit and maybe, I'm not sure what the right word is, taking the generosity of others perhaps a bit too far. My friends are building a tiny house; and planning/hoping that some other friends (not mutual other friends) will allow them to park this thing on their property for free. They freeze ice packs for the cooler they use for a fridge at a workplace. They're planning on basically a burner for cooking purposes, and saying if they need to cook more or bake, they can just go to someones house. Ditto for laundry. Showering at the gym is another one. Maybe others are more generous than I am, but I know I'd be annoyed if someone kept showing up at my house to use my kitchen because they just had to build a house that really wasn't big enough to meet their needs (when they could completely afford to do so--if it were a friend struggling financially and couldn't afford it, yes, they would be welcome with open arms).

    I think there's something to be said for deciding what you really need and enjoy and getting rid of the rest (ie. don't feel guilty for getting rid of something that you don't use or like). It's true that there are people out there who are living in houses far, far larger than they really need. Just from observing my friends, I do think one can take living small to too far of an extreme.

  14. #54
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    I wouldn't live in a place like this even if I get paid. I have a dog and she loves to wrestle and fetch.. there is no way my dog can live there!

  15. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by ks777 View Post
    I wouldn't live in a place like this even if I get paid. I have a dog and she loves to wrestle and fetch.. there is no way my dog can live there!
    You just conjured images of a dog flying out the window for me!
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

  16. #56
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    I lived in a 150-200 sq feet studio for 5 years. I did not have much space, but I chose to have a full bed when I could have a futon, so it was kind of my fault there was not much free space. The thing I missed the most was not having a bathtub. But, I had a nice microwave/convection oven and a medium size fridge and freezer . I had no problems cooking, although once I made gnocchis and the whole place was full of flour for a week.

    Somehow I was able to use every single space for storage. When I moved, I realized how much stuff I had accumulated during those years (most of it was crap i could do without). So, not very minimalist way of living in the end...

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by overedge View Post
    Wow. Space saving is one thing but I would get major claustrophobia sleeping that close to the ceiling.
    Same here. I could live in that space by myself if only the ceiling above the bed was even just 6 inches higher.

    Quote Originally Posted by soxxy View Post
    I'd wear a helmet until I got used to it....
    I remember when I went on a cruise with family - my cousins took the bunk bed and when my alarm went off (we were below deck so no natural light whatsoever), both of them sprang upright and hit their heads on their respective ceilings at the exact same time.

    Quote Originally Posted by vesperholly View Post
    I can understand why she'd live like that. The whole point of living in NYC is to not spend time in your apartment.
    Yeah, even a hermit like me would start to feel cooped up after a while, but then you can just go to all sorts of other cool places in just minutes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I think I could live in the space itself, but I think I would find all the stuff stacked up the wall claustrophobic. I hate going into stores that have merchandise stacked up to the ceiling. Her closet gives me the heebie jeebies.

    I am feeling an extreme need to throw some stuff out now.
    Yeah, in California, stacking everything up like that would NOT fly, especially if there's no place to avoid it falling on you in an earthquake. Or at least my bf wouldn't have let me get away with it...

    My bf and I are currently in the process of moving into a studio apartment together - we haven't done the measurements but if I had to hazard a guess, it's probably 350-400 sq ft. We haven't spent a whole lot of time there together yet, but it's actually pretty cool how our stuff actually fits in there. He's a true-blue minimalist (aside from having a chair and a couch separately) and the only things I hoard are art supplies. We'll see how this goes...if we start to feel cooped up there's plenty of cool stuff within walking distance.

    Quote Originally Posted by sailornyanko View Post
    I could probably live in there, but to my advantage I'm only 5'1 and weigh less than 95 pounds so i can pretty much fit everywhere.
    That's the hilarious part about our new apartment - we do get a garage, which is very convenient for the area, but you CANNOT be fat or even a little overweight to actually be able to get out of your car after you park it in there. I'm 5'5" and 110 lbs soaking wet and I've had times where I cannot open the door enough to squeeze my nonexistent butt out of the car. And I only have a Civic! The trick is to park at such an angle that if you have any passengers, they're forced to leave your car before you park into the garage.

  18. #58

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    I had a bathroom even smaller than this one once...

  19. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nan View Post
    I saw an episode of Internatinal Househunters within the last year (and a re-run just last week) of a young lady looking for a place in Paris and one of the apartments she looked at was very similar to this including the loft bed. If I remember correctly, it was the one she picked.
    I think it was this episode.

    http://www.hgtv.com/house-hunters-in...ris/index.html

    I would want a slide to safely descend first thing in the morning .

    Well, if she is ever sent to prison, she'll at least enjoy the spacious conditions .

    BTW, www.apartmenttherapy.com is currently having a contest for the coolest-looking small homes.

    Contest Divisions
    •TEENY-TINY 400 Square Feet and under
    •TINY 600 Square Feet and under (but over 400 Square Feet)
    •LITTLE 800 Square Feet and under (but over 600 Square Feet)
    •SMALL Under 1,000 Square Feet (but over 800 Square Feet)
    •INTERNATIONAL All non-US entries (under 1,000 Square Feet)
    http://community.apartmenttherapy.co...cool/2011/info

  20. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by aka_gerbil View Post
    That said, I do sometimes feel like some involved in the small home/minimalist movement are cheating a bit and maybe, I'm not sure what the right word is, taking the generosity of others perhaps a bit too far. .
    So true. I worked with someone years ago that did not have a car and talked about how green she was etc. But she was very persuasive with folks to get rides or help moving big purchases. Folks complained that she never offered gas money or something.

    The apt in this article is so small. If it was my first apt, I would have been fine, but now, not so sure. And I am very conscious of what I own (not minimalist), but refuse to expand to the space I actually have. I have an attic, that I have been in once and have nothing up there. Seems to me some people can fill the space they have because it is there.

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