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  1. #41

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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    Luckily we have a boss who's understanding of this - if you're sick
    As a supervisor, I actually sent people home sick on more than one occasion. I think people are just dedicated, trying to be responsible about their work duties, or maybe that they would feel like slackers to stay home. Once I tell them they needed to be in bed, they were happy to go. (All my employees get sick pay.)

  3. #43

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    I also wish people would stay home when sick and keep their sick kids at home. I always worry about who people are taking my germs or my child's germs home to. Like sick parents, grandparents, siblings etc... You just never know what someone's home situation is like. I keep my kids home as son as i notice they are coming down with something. It's easy for me though, since I am always home. I feel bad for those who have to work and can't take sick time fr themselves, let alone sick kids.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by acraven View Post
    US federal goverment allows (for most employees):

    13 days of sick leave per year. Accrues without limit.

    13 days of annual leave (vacation) initially, increasing to 20 days after 3 years and to 26 days after 15 years. I believe the standard carryover limit is 30 days, but this figure can be higher in some cases. Unused annual leave is cashed out when you resign or retire. If there are any federal holidays falling within that cashed-out period, retirees get paid for them as well.

    10 paid holidays per year.
    This is very similar to what my state offers (I work for a state university):

    12 days of sick leave per year; accrues without limit. Faculty get up to an additional 13 days per year that does not accrue. (I guess they are all half as healthy as the administrative and service staff. ) Fortunately I seem to have been pretty healthy the past decade or so, as I've accumulated over 100 days of sick leave. I remember when I barely had a week's worth.

    10 days of vacation per year to start; increases with longevity (at 3 year intervals) up to max of 25 days; faculty begin at that limit. Accrues to whatever is double one's annual limit (i.e. 50 days at max).

    14 paid holidays per year (2 are undesignated "floating holidays" which the employee can use whenever they choose).

    Paid funeral leave of up to 3 days for immediate family; 1 day for other family members. Paid leave if on jury duty.

    It's fairly generous if you have worked for more than a year or two and don't have small children or a family member with serious on-going health issues. There is a "sick leave bank" that I try to remember to contribute to, but they have really restricted access to this (due to abuse by some for cosmetic surgery procedures. )

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan M View Post
    As a supervisor, I actually sent people home sick on more than one occasion. I think people are just dedicated, trying to be responsible about their work duties, or maybe that they would feel like slackers to stay home. Once I tell them they needed to be in bed, they were happy to go. (All my employees get sick pay.)
    What's interesting is that when I decide that I feel too bad to come into work (I rarely get anything that's contagious, it's usually menstrual cramps or my digestive system), at that moment where I make the decision, my body immediately seems to give up and take a nosedive.

    I wonder how many of these sick people are telling themselves that they really are okay and that only the conviction is actually keeping them functioning.

    This doesn't apply to contagious nasties though. I'd stay home for that!

    But really, if I'm on the cusp of feeling terrible, being at work when it really gets bad is the most hopeless feeling ever. I had a terrible reaction to my own hormones once during the work day - dizziness, nausea, chills, was seeing stars - and I felt like I was never ever ever going to get myself home. My boss took one look at me and said I should go, and to this day I have no idea how I walked to the parking lot (takes 10 minutes) and drove home without any incident. I literally felt like I could not see.

  6. #46
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    Having sick days or personal leave days to care for sick children is a function of a relatively privileged job, at least in the current US workforce. The reason why so many go to work sick is because we don't have those sort of worker protections.

    I'm currently very lucky, and I know it's a privilege.

  7. #47

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    We give our employees 6 sick days. But if you come in sick..... will send you home....and we never count days. The policy is in place in the event we feel taken advantage of.
    DH - and that's just my opinion

  8. #48

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    I am hoping that my son and dil feel like they can leave my granddaughter with me when she maybe sick. I know from the years of work when the boys were little that we were always trading places for sick children. i.e. my turn this time, yours the next. That way we could extend the attendance policies to hopefully last through the year.

    But in the case of needing a doctor's note if you were sick more than 2 days, it was only your illness, not your child's. so if your child had chickenpox and had to stay out of day care for 7 days, you might take 2 sick days, your spouse 2 sick days and then you are back to your 2 sick days. Now you have incurred 2 illnesses episodes and only have 1 more for the next 12 months. After that you were suspended for 3 days without pay.
    American sick day policies on the whole suck.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    I know that she's desperate to finish her thesis
    That's why, right there.

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    Absolutely no excuse at all.
    Have you ever worked at a place like many people here describe? Even if your boss is lenient, an earlier job may not have been so forgiving, and it's made her scared to call in sick.

    Based on your statement, I'm almost positive you've never worked in a restaurant, right? Because if there's one place that sick people are made to feel scared for calling in sick, it's a restaurant kitchen. Scary, huh?

    The second place is some medical facilities with medical residents. One of my doctors told me about her medical fellowship year in which she got extremely sick and threw up three times in one morning, not from pregnancy. She asked to have the rest of the day off to rest and not get the patients sick. How do think the attending responded?

  11. #51
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    I am being criticized for staying home sick because I am not dying. I have been feeling crap for about two weeks (mostly lethargic), but now I have a brutal cough, can barely stay awake, but because I am well enough to write detailed coherent sub plans, I should be in with the kids. There's the logic. One sick versus ten or more potentially sick.

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    What's interesting is that when I decide that I feel too bad to come into work (I rarely get anything that's contagious, it's usually menstrual cramps or my digestive system), at that moment where I make the decision, my body immediately seems to give up and take a nosedive.

    I wonder how many of these sick people are telling themselves that they really are okay and that only the conviction is actually keeping them functioning.
    That reminds me how I would plow through the finals in college with strep throat or the flu or whatever always seems to hit around finals, and actually feel pretty OK. As soon as winter break rolled around, I'd give up and collapse in bed and then get really sick.

    My boyfriend at the time did even better--he'd always manage to get some horrible bug that drove his temp up to 104 or so and then he'd take the finals with his brain steaming and ace it. The guy was made of steel.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  13. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    You don't get any days off to deal with your pigs?
    That took me a second look to see what you were talking about. But then I sat here and literally LOL'd at your post. Thank goodness I'm alone right now. I don't like having to explain myself to those around me.

  14. #54

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    One place I worked even had a company-wide meeting, demanding that people were calling in sick too much. They said we'd better be on our death bed before even thinking of calling in sick. When someone mentioned the contagious thing, the manager flippantly told us that by the time symtoms arrived, we'd already passed the germs around, so it didn't matter by then anyway.

    One place my friend's DH worked, he was written up for calling in sick. He was then told any further sick leave had to be scheduled in advance.

    One thing I really hate is at the grocery store, when the clerk is sniffing and snotting her way through my groceries as she scans them and sends them on their merry way to the bagger, who sometimes is sniffing and and snotting their way through my selections as they bag my stuff.

    The one that really chapped my hide was the nursing home my Mom was in at the end of the year last year (she came home for good on January 1). During her stay, one of the PT's had a bad cold (though she did wear a mask when she was in the PT gym). Mom's OT was out for a week with a cold, but came in later on when she was still feeling awful. Mom's PT was "coming down with something" as she put Mom through her paces. She kept sneezing into the crook of her elbow all throughout the sessions. Mom has CoPD, and having sick people around her like that just really pissed me off. How many people in that place are on oxygen, and you're letting sick people work around them? Even on her last day, the CNA who helped us pack up was sick and sneezing and coughing. Thank goodness Mom never came down with anything. But I kept a good eye on the stuff the CNA touched, and wiped it down with antibacterial wipes when she wasn't looking. I took extra precautions by washing my hands repeatedly after touching any of Mom's things (since I didn't know what all the CNA had touched). I also had to wipe down her wheelchair handles after the CNA pushed Mom out of the room, then turned the wheelchair over to me at the nurse's station for discharge.
    Last edited by Flatfoote; 02-15-2011 at 11:56 PM.

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    Have you ever worked at a place like many people here describe? Even if your boss is lenient, an earlier job may not have been so forgiving, and it's made her scared to call in sick.

    Based on your statement, I'm almost positive you've never worked in a restaurant, right? Because if there's one place that sick people are made to feel scared for calling in sick, it's a restaurant kitchen. Scary, huh?

    The second place is some medical facilities with medical residents. One of my doctors told me about her medical fellowship year in which she got extremely sick and threw up three times in one morning, not from pregnancy. She asked to have the rest of the day off to rest and not get the patients sick. How do think the attending responded?
    Obviously no I haven't, and I know I'm really lucky for it.

    Yeah, I think the grad student used to work someplace that was a lot harsher. I think she believes that she's always on her own and that nobody will make an exception for her, which is commendable since she's doing grad school full-time while juggling two kids and not complaining, but put pneumonia on top of that and it's just sad if she doesn't believe she can ask for help then.

    The restaurant and medical examples you gave are just FRIGHTENING. And some people wonder why we don't trust our healthcare system now.

  16. #56
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    California here. I stay home with the kids and my hubby works. Whatever hubby brings home on his paycheck is what we get. Period. No government help what so ever. Hubby works in trucking. He's an operations manager which is 2nd in charge of the entire facility. Here's what he gets now that it's his 3rd year with the company: 10 vacation days and 3 personal day. NO sick days. If you're sick you have to use up either vacation or personal day. The Friday after Thanksgiving is used up as a personal or vacation day too.
    It really depends on the company and the boss. Where hubby's at he's expected to show up, and if he's not there then he better be in a hospital bed with an IV stuck in his arm. That said, the company he works for is still considered one of the best in trucking.

  17. #57

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    Note to supervisors:

    As you can see from the thread, many people are afraid to call in sick and will continue to work unless they get permission to stay home.

    If you have such authority, it is your responsibility to say to an obviously ill employee, "You're clearly very sick and need to be home recovering. It's in your best interest and the best interest of everyone else too." All your employees, foremost the sick person, will thank you for it.

    Anita18, was your supervisor there? If so, s/he should have said something.

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    Note to supervisors:

    As you can see from the thread, many people are afraid to call in sick. It is your responsibility to say to an obviously ill employee, "You're clearly very sick and need to be home recovering. It's in your best interest and the best interest of everyone else too."

    Anita18, was your supervisor there? If so, s/he should have said something.
    If only it was that easy. We are so short staffed that I have to watch that we have enough licensed staff around to meet legal minimum requirements. I do encourage my staff to stay home when ill, but everyone knows what a huge hardship this places on everyone else. I had to spend two days last week and two days this week at my second site, covering for sick staff. I got absolutely none of my own work done. If only we had the option of hiring more staff.

  19. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flatfoote View Post
    The one that really chapped my hide was the nursing home my Mom was in at the end of the year last year (she came home for good on January 1). During her stay, one of the PT's had a bad cold (though she did wear a mask when she was in the PT gym). Mom's OT was out for a week with a cold, but came in later on when she was still feeling awful. Mom's PT was "coming down with something" as she put Mom through her paces. She kept sneezing into the crook of her elbow all throughout the sessions. Mom has CoPD, and having sick people around her like that just really pissed me off. How many people in that place are on oxygen, and you're letting sick people work around them? Even on her last day, the CNA who helped us pack up was sick and sneezing and coughing. Thank goodness Mom never came down with anything. But I kept a good eye on the stuff the CNA touched, and wiped it down with antibacterial wipes when she wasn't looking. I took extra precautions by washing my hands repeatedly after touching any of Mom's things (since I didn't know what all the CNA had touched). I also had to wipe down her wheelchair handles after the CNA pushed Mom out of the room, then turned the wheelchair over to me at the nurse's station for discharge.
    IME, unless you have an aggressive Infection Control and Employee Health departments, medical facilities are the worst at allowing sick time. I understand the nature of the shift work and the needs of patients/clients is such that you can not have too many call ins. And in these days of healthcare dollars being watched so closely (a good thing), you need to schedule for the number of clients. Most skilled nursing facilities do not have aggressive IC departments as they are smaller and not connected with a hospital system.

  20. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    Note to supervisors:

    As you can see from the thread, many people are afraid to call in sick and will continue to work unless they get permission to stay home.

    If you have such authority, it is your responsibility to say to an obviously ill employee, "You're clearly very sick and need to be home recovering. It's in your best interest and the best interest of everyone else too." All your employees, foremost the sick person, will thank you for it.

    Anita18, was your supervisor there? If so, s/he should have said something.
    But is still doesn't erase the fact that the employee needs to use their PTO hours because there is no sick leave days, just a lump sum of PTO for everything.

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