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  1. #181

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    Please, let's not turn this into a fur vs non fur debate, we all know Johnny's views on fur and "been there, done that".


    Getting back to the topic, I'm quite sure that no matter what he is saying, Johnny's move to New York City is so he is closer to the fashion industry which has always been his dream.

    I may also be in the minority here, but with the proper make up and decent hair styling, Johnny looks really good on camera. He is comfortable in front of an audience and I think he would do well as a model for men's clothing.
    Last edited by judiz; 02-10-2011 at 12:26 PM.

  2. #182
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    I see Johnny wearing a fur bolero jacket and a fur bikini with fur thigh high boots---each item out of a different fur . lmao And why not add a pair of fake fur eyelashes lol

  3. #183
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    I've grown weary of his constant references to his being "skinny." Lysacek's a stick compared to Weir.

    While it's nice that Johnny's making contacts by doing the catwalk thing, it would be smarter for him to actually enroll in some classes if he wants to make a career out of design and fashion. Just going to parties doesn't get give you knowledge, it just makes you a hanger-on. You have to have some knowledge and expertise, otherwise you're just playing around. (Which might be his intention.)

    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    Yeah, imagine the aerodynamics of jumps in a big fur coat.
    I remember when figure skating coaches and judges wore heavy fur coats and boots for test sessions, especially on outdoor rinks. It was quite a sight, watching them trudge across the ice to check Compulsory Figures tracings.

  4. #184
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    There are many non-fur coats that will keep you just as warm if not warmer than a fur coat. Buy your coat from a manufacturer that gives a temperature rating as to the lowest temp the coat will keep you warm.

    Military coats are among the best for keeping warm.
    One way to get a good coat without a lot of money, is to buy used Army and Navy clothing. The N3B coat is legendary for being warm. It is rated to -60 degrees farenheight. You can find one of these coats for less than fifty dollars and be as warm as you would be in an eight hundred dollar coat.

    There are also good used coats called the M51 and the M65 that were made for the Korean War. They are most often referred to as fishtails. They can't handle as extreme conditions as the N3B, but they are rated to handle as low as 14 degrees farenheight. The good thing about the fishtail is that it allows you to add lots of layers and is good at keeping out the wind. A good winter coat must keep out all the wind. If you feel any wind coming through your winter coat, you can be sure that you need an upgrade.

  5. #185

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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    1.1 million is a pretty good price for any real estate in Manhattan, really, but Madison Square Park isn't exactly the trendiest or most exciting part of Manhattan by any means. It's a nice area, but it's pretty corporate and lacks the cultural energy of many other neighborhoods.
    It's not the most exciting, but the park is nice in itself and it's a nice central location (about as central as you can get without hitting the less desirable midtown areas). It's walking distance of Union Square and the Village/SoHo are a fast subway ride away. Upper Manhattan wouldn't be a major trek either. Grammercy Park is also close by and a very nice area to walk around even if you can't actually get in the park.

    If I lived there I'd be getting Shake Shack burgers and groceries at Eataly all the time. Congrats to Johnny, I'm sure he'll love it.

  6. #186

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    Quote Originally Posted by FigureSpins View Post
    While it's nice that Johnny's making contacts by doing the catwalk thing, it would be smarter for him to actually enroll in some classes if he wants to make a career out of design and fashion. Just going to parties doesn't get give you knowledge, it just makes you a hanger-on. You have to have some knowledge and expertise, otherwise you're just playing around. (Which might be his intention.)
    I believe that Johnny has taken some classes/seminars at the Fashion Institute of Technology, but that's about it. I'm not sure how far he wants to go with that. And most likely, he comes up with some ideas, and then uses people in the industry who know what they're doing to bring them to life. But I don't know - maybe he does his own designs himself; I have no idea, having never talked to the man about this.
    And so, dear Lord, it is with deep sadness that we turn over to you this young woman, whose dream to ride on a giant swan resulted in her death. Maybe it is your way of telling us... to buy American.

  7. #187

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    Just for the record, he hasn't taken classes there. Not to say he might not know something about design but just that he hasn't been a student there.
    Last edited by Willowway; 02-10-2011 at 02:51 PM.

  8. #188

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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    And most likely, he comes up with some ideas, and then uses people in the industry who know what they're doing to bring them to life.
    This is exactly what he does. As in "See this jacket? That's what I want, except make the sleeves fuller and the collar should have points." And the expert does all the work and then Johnny puts his name on it.
    "You just can't underestimate the power of positive underwear." 2013 Fruit of the Loom ad

  9. #189

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    I am by no means a 'designer' but years ago when I was sewing alot, I decided I needed more control over what I was making for myself. So I took a few pattern-making courses and a draping course. What fun! Exacting, lots of work and it must be the latent engineer in me but taking a basic pattern and "making" those different sleeves, variation on the collar, etc. is exciting and fun to do. You get exactly (after a bit of trial and error) what you want and it's very satisfying (after the swearing, screaming and hair-tearing during the trial and error part!). I recommend it to anyone who loves to create for themselves.

  10. #190
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    Where did you take such classes? The only thing I can find around here is how to make a pillowcase (but not one with nice french seams- basically just straightline sewing) or pajama pants (but not well fitted oens that I could translate the skills to actual pants).

    I love sewing, but my clothes have the same problem as RTW, because I don't really know how to alter!

  11. #191

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    In those days, the Cambridge Center for Adult Education (I lived in Cambridge, MA at the time) had the most wonderful courses in pattern drafting (from a sloper which we each made for ourselves), etc. Unlikely to be in that space but it worked.

    I don't know where you are but look around and ask at your local fabric shop - they may know. If nothing is happening, there are professional teachers who tour with workshops in this sort of thing. But I loved having a weekly class because it gave me time to do my 'homework' and really absorb the techniques gradually.

    If all else fails, there are also good courses on DVD in alterations and/or pattern drafting. Do you get "Threads" magazine? Lots in there about these things. I love reading it - it inspires me.

  12. #192
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    Local fabric shop- hahaha! Joanns is the closest thing we have.

    I've found a seamstress in town who does private lessons- but they are out of my reach pricewise (more than skating lessons.) I'd really like a group setting as well.

    I checked the community college to see if they have any sort of fashion degree, but they don't.

    I'm thinking Iowa just doesn't have the resources

  13. #193

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    DVDs and Threads. You can get a lot from those sources. It must be frustrating not having the resources you want. I admit, as someone who lived near Boston and now near NYC, I'm very spoiled.

  14. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaphyre14 View Post
    This is exactly what he does. As in "See this jacket? That's what I want, except make the sleeves fuller and the collar should have points." And the expert does all the work and then Johnny puts his name on it.
    Not that I'm a fan of this, but this happens all the time. The very famous glass artist Dale Chihuly has been blind in one eye since the early 1970s, and therefore cannot actually blow glass. But he designs the pieces and hires the best glassblowers in the world to make them for him, and his name goes on it.
    In my spare time, I like to interview figure skating legends.

  15. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by judiz View Post
    I may also be in the minority here, but with the proper make up and decent hair styling, Johnny looks really good on camera. He is comfortable in front of an audience and I think he would do well as a model for men's clothing.
    I agree with you. He is a nice looking guy. But unfortunately (IMHO at least) he doesn't appear too often in proper makeup and decent hair styling. If he looked more like the models in the ads, when he shows up for events and other public gigs, he might be a more visible candidate for modelling gigs.
    Who wants to watch rich people eat pizza? They must have loved that in Bangladesh. - Randy Newman on the 2014 Oscars broadcast

  16. #196

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    Quote Originally Posted by manleywoman View Post
    Not that I'm a fan of this, but this happens all the time. The very famous glass artist Dale Chihuly has been blind in one eye since the early 1970s, and therefore cannot actually blow glass. But he designs the pieces and hires the best glassblowers in the world to make them for him, and his name goes on it.
    The difference being that Chihuly actually studied glass design and did own work for many years before the accidents that forced him to hire others. That's far away from simply looking at someone else's work and telling them that you don't like it and they should change it.
    "You just can't underestimate the power of positive underwear." 2013 Fruit of the Loom ad

  17. #197

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    Dale Chihuly has been blind in one eye since the early 1970s, and therefore cannot actually blow glass.
    One key distinction though - Dale C. knows how to blow glass and was an expert glass blower himself at one time (that's how he began to build his substantial reputation as an artist). So he is not ignorant of the technical fine points in any way. Most (almost all) great artists in any field start on the ground, understand the technical through their own experience and build the artistry on top of that.

    zaphyre14 beat me to it!
    Last edited by Willowway; 02-10-2011 at 06:17 PM.

  18. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willowway View Post
    One key distinction though - Dale C. knows how to blow glass and was an expert glass blower himself at one time (that's how he began to build his substantial reputation as an artist). So he is not ignorant of the technical fine points in any way. Most (almost all) great artists in any field start on the ground, understand the technical through their own experience and build the artistry on top of that.

    zaphyre14 beat me to it!
    As a former glass blower myself, "expert" is relative. He was a decent glass blower, but not much beyond that. Certainly no match for the guys he works with now.

    No, he's not ignorant of the technical aspect of the medium at all, nor the equipment and industry, and he's done AMAZING things for the community at large. But the point is there are plenty of artists who hire others to do their work and just put their name on it.
    In my spare time, I like to interview figure skating legends.

  19. #199

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    But the point is there are plenty of artists who hire others to do their work and just put their name on it.
    Right and my point was that no artist (who has earned that 'title') out-sources all or most of technical aspects of their art without knowing that territory very well themselves. The words 'amateur' and 'dabbler' apply to those who bring no technical knowledge, actual artistic expertise and artistic discipline to the table. Where Johnny fits, I won't say - time will tell.
    Last edited by Willowway; 02-10-2011 at 06:44 PM.

  20. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaphyre14 View Post
    The difference being that Chihuly actually studied glass design and did own work for many years before the accidents that forced him to hire others. That's far away from simply looking at someone else's work and telling them that you don't like it and they should change it.
    Agree - it's common practice, always has been, to have apprentices and assistants execute work through various stages of design and creation of art, and certainly fashion.

    The results though are almost always better when the visionary has a solid background in actually doing what he's instructing others to do

    Sounds like this designer is just using Johnny's name for a little extra publicity - no different than most other celebrity fashion lines. Maybe what he should aspire to is a fragrance - there is HUGE money in celebrity-branded scents.

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