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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by pat c View Post
    I've never seen to Kill a Mockingbird, but love the book. I've always been scared to watch the movie in case I was really disappointed.
    I suppose it's possible that you would be disappointed in the movie, but I think the odds are against it. Gregory Peck was wonderful as Atticus Finch, and Robert Duvall was Boo Radley. The child actors were all very good too.

  2. #62

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    As good as the movie To kill a Mockingbird was, particularly Gregory Peck, I enjoyed the book more.

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matryeshka View Post
    Right there with you. I've enjoyed all the movie versions of Austen novels (except Emma--nothing could save that story) much better than the books. Austen novels fall into that category of things I think I *should* like--it's literary, it's girly, social commentary, some dry wit here and there, and wacky British notions--but I just don't. I finally admitted to myself that no, I appreciate S&S and P&P, but I don't like them.

    FLOVE the movie versions though.
    I feel the same way about Austen; I always thought I was weird or something because my degree is in English literature. I have read tons of books set in England in the same time frame as Austen's but I just can't struggle through any of her books. I haven't tried them all but I've started many but never finished any of them.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    So do I -- and so does my niece. I think I have at least 6 different editions of P&P and several of Persuasion as well.
    I have 4 different editions of P&P.

    BTW, I love Dario Marionelli's score to the film. Has anyone skated to it? Can you Alissa Czisny skating to the opening piece?
    Last edited by IceAlisa; 02-05-2011 at 12:00 AM.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

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  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vash01 View Post
    As good as the movie To kill a Mockingbird was, particularly Gregory Peck, I enjoyed the book more.
    Me too, though a lot had to do with the fact that too much had to be cut from the film. Like the richness of the relationship between Scout and Calpurnia -- very well-developed in the book, hardly existant in the film. But that's so often the case with novels-to-film. The ideal length of literature for a film adaptation -- if you don't want to cut anything --is a short story or novella. (Or a children's book like Where the Wild Things Are -- a grand total of 338 words!)

  6. #66
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    Despite a couple of annoying changes, I enjoyed the 2008 film version of Prince Caspian more than the book. The movie has charm and excitement, whereas the book is rather dry. It was always my least favorite of the Narnia series.

    I liked the film My Sister's Keeper but thought the book was trite and overdone.

    Regarding Fanny Price, it breaks my heart just a little when I see people put her down. She has her flaws, but she's gentle, wise, and has great strength at her core. I've always considered her one of the most underrated fictional characters.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by falling_dance View Post
    The Shining (1980)
    Oh, I must disagree. Jack Nicholson was clearly better than the book character. But the story was much better developed in the book. They also changed some very important things in the film, like the ending. I felt the same way about The Stand and The Dead Zone.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by RockTheTassel View Post

    I liked the film My Sister's Keeper but thought the book was trite and overdone.
    .
    Because that's the only way Jodi Piccoult knows how to write...

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by RockTheTassel View Post
    Regarding Fanny Price, it breaks my heart just a little when I see people put her down. She has her flaws, but she's gentle, wise, and has great strength at her core. I've always considered her one of the most underrated fictional characters.
    I agree she has great qualities, and I admire those, but somehow in her they don't translate into likability for me.
    Charter member of the "We Always Believed in Ashley" Club and the "We Believe in Ricky" Club
    Old, lonely, pathos-hungry, and extremely gullible

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    I suppose it's possible that you would be disappointed in the movie, but I think the odds are against it. Gregory Peck was wonderful as Atticus Finch, and Robert Duvall was Boo Radley. The child actors were all very good too.
    I didn't realize that Robert Duvall was Boo Radley. Interesting casting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vash01 View Post
    As good as the movie To kill a Mockingbird was, particularly Gregory Peck, I enjoyed the book more.
    Hmm......still thinking if I want to see the movie.

    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    I have 4 different editions of P&P.

    BTW, I love Dario Marionelli's score to the film. Has anyone skated to it? Can you Alissa Czisny skating to the opening piece?
    Dario Marionelli's name isn't ringing any bells. So no, I don't think anyone has used it at the international level.

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by pat c View Post

    Dario Marionelli's name isn't ringing any bells. So no, I don't think anyone has used it at the international level.
    Here's the music I am talking about:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vYY0aRH46I

    I can totally picture Czisny skating to this. Must. Stop. Choreographing. In my head.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  12. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    Here's the music I am talking about:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vYY0aRH46I

    I can totally picture Czisny skating to this. Must. Stop. Choreographing. In my head.
    I think that it better suited for a pairs program.

  13. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by pat c View Post
    I didn't realize that Robert Duvall was Boo Radley. Interesting casting.
    This was his screen debut. He had been doing TV and theatre before this.

  14. #74
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    If you haven't seen To Kill A Mockingbird I say you're not missing anything. The book is 1000000000000 times better than the movie.

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    Quote Originally Posted by immoimeme View Post
    If you haven't seen To Kill A Mockingbird I say you're not missing anything. The book is 1000000000000 times better than the movie.
    I think they are both wonderful in their own way. I always tend to think of them separately, though.

    I taught the book to sophomores for eight years, twice a year and watched the movie with them every time--so I've seen it somewhere around 20 times (including when I was a sophomore and a few random viewings before I started teaching it).

    The movie focuses more on the court case. That is a key part of the book, but there are so many other things in the book that the movie leaves out. Because it focuses on the case, it in many ways focuses more on the Atticus and the children relating to him and the case than on Boo Radley and the neighborhood. The coming of age aspects of the book are not really as emphasized--hence the point someone made about the film not really depicting Scout relating to Calpurnia, who is in many ways her key female role model in the book. The character of Miss Maudie is also not well developed, Aunt Alexandra is not included, and Mrs. Dubose is more of a cameo and the children's real encounter with her is left out. Those characters' roles are part of the coming of age aspects of the story.

  16. #76
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    When I was in high school P&P was one of the books for one of my english classes. I tried to read it. I really did. It was the most boring, painfully slow book I have tried to read. Ever. I ended up watching the BBC version and wrote my report from that.

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by KikiSashaFan View Post
    When I was in high school P&P was one of the books for one of my english classes. I tried to read it. I really did. It was the most boring, painfully slow book I have tried to read. Ever. I ended up watching the BBC version and wrote my report from that.
    The trouble with P&P in school (I taught that for nine years) is that a lot of teachers suck the joy out of it. I had a student teacher the last semester I taught who did such a fine job sucking the joy out of that book that I wasn't sure I liked it anymore.

    Austen's humor is subtle. The BBC miniseries took the subtle humor and made it bigger for people. But they didn't get that from nowhere, it's all there. I think the other problem is that students are not accustomed to reading anything fun and humorous in school so they just aren't looking for that. I often had students point out to me that it was basically the only thing they were given in four years of high school that had nothing tragic in at all and a truly happy ending.

    My students who truly read it, usually enjoyed it. One year, I had a class full of football players who loved it by the end.

  18. #78
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    I think part of the problem was the year before one of the options had been Snow Falling On Cedars, which I had read and would have been excited to do a project on, but a few parents complained it was inappropriate and had in yanked from the course, and I was bitter

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    Quote Originally Posted by KikiSashaFan View Post
    I think part of the problem was the year before one of the options had been Snow Falling On Cedars, which I had read and would have been excited to do a project on, but a few parents complained it was inappropriate and had in yanked from the course, and I was bitter
    Did you have to read the book you chose on your own?

    Because I always had a few students who had read or tried to read P&P on their own prior to the course and disliked it. It was usually because they missed the satire and irony--two literary techniques that teenagers typically aren't adept at recognizing without a little teaching.

    Of course, my student teacher wasn't either. She explained to the students that in the scene at dinner when Mr. Collins first arrives, Mr. Bennet is asking him questions about himself because "Mr Bennet is a gracious host". I ended up interrupting to explain that, no, Mr. B is mocking Collins. And one boy responded, "oh, well, I like it better knowing that."

  20. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by PDilemma View Post
    She explained to the students that in the scene at dinner when Mr. Collins first arrives, Mr. Bennet is asking him questions about himself because "Mr Bennet is a gracious host".
    Thank you, PDilemma. You made my day!

    (For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn? )

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