Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 96

Thread: Dogs at Work?

  1. #21
    engaged to dupa
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Heaven for climate, Hell for company.
    Posts
    18,917
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    1083
    I have no opinion one way or the other but a couple questions come to mind.

    What if a dog bites someone or has an accident and someone slips and falls? Is the employer or the dog owner responsible?

    Wouldn't an animal need some exercise and/or care during the workday? Does that happen during the employee's lunch and break time?
    3539 and counting.

    Slightly Wounding Banana list cont: MacMadame.

  2. #22
    engaged to dupa
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Heaven for climate, Hell for company.
    Posts
    18,917
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    1083
    Quote Originally Posted by orbitz View Post

    Do dogs really fart? Like human?
    Worse, much worse.
    3539 and counting.

    Slightly Wounding Banana list cont: MacMadame.

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg MB
    Posts
    1,185
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    at my doctors office one of the doctors brings his schnauzer in. The dog usually stays with him in his office but occasionally she comes out. She's super friendly and even though i dont like dogs i dont have a problem with her checking out the waiting room. FYI my doctors office deals with a lot of HIV/AIDS patients and I'm sure her presence is very calming. On the tv screen where they put up important information a blurb about Casey is on there and if you are allergic or afraid of dogs you just let the receptionist know and they just let that one doctor know so he will keep her in his office.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    5,786
    vCash
    470
    Rep Power
    3403
    I worked at a place that had "bring your dog to work day." Two of the dogs hated each other on first sniff. The entire day was spent making sure that the two dogs didn't go after each other. That was our last doggy day.

    Frankly, I'm old school. Work is work, home is home. I don't appreciate mixing the two.
    AceOn6, the golf loving skating fan

  5. #25
    AYS's snark-sponge
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    in the Bobrova & Soloviev Fan Clubhouse
    Posts
    41,586
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    15900
    It would make my work day immeasurably better if I could have my dog at work.

    However, I don't think it can work to bring dogs to work in most ordinary work situations, starting from the fact that some folks have severe allergies and moving to the fact that some dogs may not get along if you have multiple dogs being brought in.

    Its a shame for us doggy-dog folks but I think its for the best overall.
    Congratulations 2014 World Ice Dance Champions Anna Cappellini & Luca Lanotte!!!

  6. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Where banjos play.
    Age
    35
    Posts
    8,070
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    If I'm having work done on my apartment, or my dog needs observation due to being sick or something, they don't mind if I bring her to work(just keep her in my office). Several people bring their dogs in occasionally, but not on a regular basis. It's a small company though, so we can get away with that easier.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Looking for cupcakes
    Posts
    30,712
    vCash
    5550
    Rep Power
    14096
    Quote Originally Posted by rvi5 View Post
    Perhaps that is exactly what you need to overcome your phobia. Sure it would be uncomfortable for awhile, but constant exposure in a controlled environment may eventually dispel your fears.
    NOT.NOT.NOT. I can not believe that you suggest this as a "solution"

    from the second thread my post:
    I don't know of any dog or non dog employer policies, but I do have a comment or two.

    I am terrified by dogs - little dogs, medium dogs, big dogs. Doesn't matter. For some of you that seems to be an irrational fear. For me it is a real fear rooted in what I don't know. All my kids have dogs - I am on edge everytime I am at their houses. It is like being on a roller coaster at the top and never knowing when you will drop. I absolutely freak out when the dogs want to kiss/slobber all over me. And when the kids kiss their dogs.
    I also have asthma and the shedding on the furiture, etc. - unless I run around with a portable washstand, I will inadvertently rub my eyes/nose and then start wheezing. So for me, I would need to seriously consider another place of employment. Yes - I know that there are major studies that indicate how much your quality of life is with your pets in the workplace or even as a companion for an elderly or house bound person. I am most likely the exception rather than the norm.

  8. #28
    Loving on babies!
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Twin heaven!
    Posts
    11,652
    vCash
    1570
    Rep Power
    15573
    I work in a hospital ICU. Yeah, no dogs at work for us.

    Besides, how limiting and discriminatory! I have cats, why don't I get to take THEM to work? Why can't my friend bring in her fish? Why can't someone else bring in tarantulas? Etc, etc, etc!

    Bad idea IMO, unless it is a 3-person workplace and all agree, or something similarly unique.
    I am free of all prejudices. I hate everyone equally.~W. C. Fields

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    City of Blinding Light
    Posts
    15,742
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    4218
    I interviewed at a company where the employees could bring their dogs to work. There was a dog in the office as I interviewed, going in and out, etc. I chose not to work there.

    I know it's un-American, but I just don't love dogs. I mean, they're fine, but I'd prefer not to have one. In the workplace, I'd find them disruptive. So I chose not to work there, as that company obviously was not a fit for me.
    And so, dear Lord, it is with deep sadness that we turn over to you this young woman, whose dream to ride on a giant swan resulted in her death. Maybe it is your way of telling us... to buy American.

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,422
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by LadyNit View Post
    Dogs are welcome in the office, ... two tiny Yorkies, poodle-mix, italian greyhound, a boston bull, a labradoodle, a basingi mix, a smooth coat collie, and a rotating family of border collies ...
    OMG that sounds like paradise. (So long as you consider paradise to be a little bit insane, that is.) Lucky you!

    Quote Originally Posted by nubka View Post
    Why would anyone want to bring their dog to work...?
    Aside from what others have said about the potentially positive effects on the work environment, it's also good for the dog. I'm not able to have a dog myself (condo bylaw) but if that ever changes, I still wouldn't get a dog unless I was able to take it work with me. In my view it's just not fair to the dog. They're social creatures, and leaving them alone for 10 hours a day is just not right IMO. So if the work environment allows it and the dog is well trained ... ideal.

    Which also answers the question of why this issue comes up with dogs but not cats or guppies -- it's because they're different animals. I'd love to bring my cat in to work, but that wouldn't be fair on her. She is decidedly not a social creature (or at least not with anyone but me), and she sleeps 20 hours a day anyway. (Plus she hates going in the car.)

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    554
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by numbers123 View Post
    NOT.NOT.NOT. I can not believe that you suggest this as a "solution"
    That is your fear speaking.

    If you were to go to a psychologist, that is very likely how they would treat you ie. exposure. If people hate standing in lines, they will tell you to do exactly that. Since you appear to have an unusually high level of fear, they would start gradually ie. distant exposure to an innocent puppy, petting a puppy someone is holding with it's back to you, etc.. As you progress, they will increase the exposure. Eventually taking you to a dog park with many dogs. Despite being terrified of the idea, the key is exposure. You will never be cured by avoidance.

    Of course, immediate exposure to an office full of dogs would not be the best way to start for someone with your level of fear. Although, it may be OK for people with mild cases. My brother's step-daughter is uncomfortable (not terrified) with large dogs. She grew up never owning a dog, just cats. Her lack of exposure to dogs is what makes her uncomfortable. She is OK being in my home with my Dobes, but becomes afraid if they make sudden moves.

    I remember one New Years Day, my first Dobe found a piece of glass in the backyard. He was in the living room chewing on it, when the step-daughter reported it to me. I had to open his mouth with one hand, while extracting the glass shard with the other. Afterwards, my Dobe was excited and began running back-and-forth in the living room. When he turned in her direction, she gasped and leaned back against her boyfriend. My Dobe slammed on the brakes and just stared at her, wondering what was up. As I walked towards the washroom to dispose of the glass and wash my hands, my Dobe just glanced at me, glanced back at her, then followed me to the washroom. End of incident.

  12. #32

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Looking for cupcakes
    Posts
    30,712
    vCash
    5550
    Rep Power
    14096
    Quote Originally Posted by rvi5 View Post
    That is your fear speaking.

    If you were to go to a psychologist, that is very likely how they would treat you ie. exposure. If people hate standing in lines, they will tell you to do exactly that. Since you appear to have an unusually high level of fear, they would start gradually ie. distant exposure to an innocent puppy, petting a puppy someone is holding with it's back to you, etc.. As you progress, they will increase the exposure. Eventually taking you to a dog park with many dogs. Despite being terrified of the idea, the key is exposure. You will never be cured by avoidance..
    are you a psychologist? I remember in the 70's that was a widely held view, expose the person to their fear and it will get better. In fact, I was assigned to go after an OCD patient who was so exact about time he would correct all the clocks in the unit. I had to go around and change the time on clocks to "expose" him to different clocks/times. Of course it didn't work for either of us.
    No amount of exposure to dogs will decrease my fear. As if I haven't try - the kids wanted dogs when they were growing up. They have the gentlest of dogs. Accept you like dogs, you think that everyone should like/love dogs. Not everyone will agree with you.

  13. #33
    drinky typo pbp, closet hugger
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    c'est genifique!
    Posts
    29,690
    vCash
    325
    Rep Power
    15340
    Quote Originally Posted by rvi5 View Post
    That is your fear speaking.

    If you were to go to a psychologist, that is very likely how they would treat you ie. exposure.
    Unless you are a psychologist - and specifically a pasychologist treating the poster in question, that's an incredibly ignorant and arrogant thing to say.

    Oh, and I've seen workplaces with cats and fish, too.
    Q: Why can't I read the competition threads?
    A: Competition forums on the board are available to those with a Season Pass or a premium membership How to View Kiss & Cry

  14. #34

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Skating in a Canadian beautiful way
    Age
    35
    Posts
    3,701
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    6255
    I would love to bring my dog to work!

    In the office where I used to work, there was a woman who used to bring her (small) puppy in with her. She had food & water, a blanket and toys and stayed in my co-worker's cubicle with no problems. She was pure joy.

    At the shop where my mom works (she's an accountant for a vintage car repair company) one of the mechanics starting bringing his miniature Boston Terrier to work when the puppy was 6 months old and he was renovating his house. The dog hasn't missed a day of "work" since, and that was 7 years ago. All the delivery drivers, customers, etc. know the dog and bring her treats. Some of them even give her birthday and Christmas presents .

  15. #35

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Skating in a Canadian beautiful way
    Age
    35
    Posts
    3,701
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    6255
    Quote Originally Posted by genevieve View Post
    Oh, and I've seen workplaces with cats and fish, too.
    I used to have a fish in my office. His bowl sat on the corner of my desk for two years.

  16. #36
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,422
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Or how about an office squirrel?

  17. #37

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    In the Land of Unrealistic Assumptions
    Posts
    4,514
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    2293
    One of my former bosses had fish in a small tank on her desk for years and one of the (wacko) engineers used to bring his toddler daughter AND her cat into his office whenever the babysitter cancelled. I'm highly allergic to cats and my nose would clog up whenever they were there, but I didn't complain because the cat kept the child amused. I did ask him to keep the cat out of the common areas (bathroom and lounge) if he could. He did and there was no problem - until Dad started leaving his daughter's dirty diapers in the lounge trash bin....but that's a different issue.

    That's why I didn't feel it would be a problem bringing Muttley in. He's small, quiet and most comfortable sleeping at my feet on his blankie. I kept him confined to my cubicle (which is actually bigger than most offices), had a bowl of water and some treats on hand, and took him for walks on my break and at lunch - which was what got me into trouble. If I had just put papers down on the veranda and cleaned up after him, no one would have known he was there.
    "You just can't underestimate the power of positive underwear." 2013 Fruit of the Loom ad

  18. #38

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    5,971
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    1891
    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    They're social creatures, and leaving them alone for 10 hours a day is just not right IMO. So if the work environment allows it and the dog is well trained ... ideal.
    I guess it hasn't occurred to you that maybe some of your colleagues wouldn't want the dog to be a "social creature" with them. For people with allergies or fears or just a desire not to have a dog slobbering all over them while they're trying to work, that situation wouldn't be "ideal."

    Someone upthread said it best: keep home and work separate. Pets of all kinds belong at home. You wouldn't bring a baby to work, and at least they don't attack people...yes, dogs can bite and hurt people, even if they are "well-trained."

    Quote Originally Posted by rvi5 View Post
    Despite being terrified of the idea, the key is exposure. You will never be cured by avoidance.
    You're assuming that someone would want and need to be cured. Dogs are not essential to our everyday lives, unlike, say, cars or stairs or just talking to other people. You need to separate daily functioning from optional recreation. If someone doesn't want to be around a dog, they don't really have to. It's the law (at least in the U.S.) that dogs in public must be kept on leashes. There are laws governing where owners can take them and what they can do with them, to protect both other people as well as the dogs. Just like there are laws limiting religious activity, smoking, or harassment in the workplace or other public venues.

    When he turned in her direction, she gasped and leaned back against her boyfriend. My Dobe slammed on the brakes and just stared at her, wondering what was up. As I walked towards the washroom to dispose of the glass and wash my hands, my Dobe just glanced at me, glanced back at her, then followed me to the washroom. End of incident.
    Your step-daughter is lucky, b/c most dogs in that situation get the wrong idea and think the person is playing with them (or about to attack them) and start jumping and/or biting. When I was a kid, I got jumped and/or bitten a couple of times by the dogs of friends or relatives, and the dogs were all "well-trained."

    I dislike how some dog owners think their dogs should be the center of the universe and take precedence over the welfare of people. Anyone who wants a dog has that right, but they don't have the right to endanger others. Not to mention have their dog do its business anywhere it pleases and leave the poop for that property owner to clean up (and No. 1 damages grass and flowers, too).

    As far as workplace dogs....several times in my working life, at various jobs, people have occasionally brought dogs in, presumably with no thought to health or other issues for anyone else. I remember one person brought her two dogs into the office, and brought them to my desk, not long after I started, b/c she "always brings the dogs to meet the new people." OK, the dogs stay at home, why the feck should she or I care about meeting her dogs? And for all she knew, I could have been highly allergic and gone into anapylactic shock with those dogs in my cubicle. I also remember a couple situations where dogs were brought infor the day so "everyone can meet him" or b/c the person was having work done in their house, and the dogs would occasionally break loose and start running through the office and into people's work areas and the owner and others would have to chase after them. Definitely not an "ideal" situation.
    Last edited by Debbie S; 02-03-2011 at 07:42 PM.

  19. #39
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,422
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Debbie S View Post
    I guess it hasn't occurred to you that maybe some of your colleagues wouldn't want the dog to be a "social creature" with them. For people with allergies or fears or just a desire not to have a dog slobbering all over them while they're trying to work, that situation wouldn't be "ideal."
    Um, yes, it has "occured to me." Which is why I said if the dog is well trained and if the work environment allows it. Obviously it's not universally doable.


  20. #40
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Somewhere in Canada
    Posts
    535
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I have lived with the fear of certain dogs and I think the biggest problem with having dogs in the office is the behaviour of the dog owners. Some are respectful of people's phobias and allergies, some are not. Some will let their dog run around and disturb people, some will not. It's hard to have a policy that says only good dog owners can bring their dogs...

    I don't let any stranger's dog approach me no matter how friendly he/she is said to be because bottom line, I don't know the person, how they raised their dogs or what they consider to be "friendly" behaviour. Having a stranger's dog jump you is fine for some people, terrorizing to me.

    The attitude expressed by some that the fearful person is the problem and he/she should just get over it is also held by a lot of people as we see here. I have an acquaintance who once told me I should just "get over" being afraid of her dog jumping on me, that small creatures don't eat big creatures. I tried many ways to explain my feelings to no avail... until she came to my place and saw a spider, screamed and would not move until I killed it. I think she gained a bit of insight after that episode...

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •