Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 65
  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,752
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Another way to use up those big bundles of fresh cilantro is to get a bunny. Most of them can't get enough of it.

  2. #22
    Port de bras!!!
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ravenclaw
    Posts
    30,156
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    35082
    I make and freeze my own pasta sauces, usually with dried or fresh mushrooms and eggplant.

    I also recommend making your own salad dressing--I really don't like the store bought stuff and throwing together a dressing where you can control the ingredients takes just a few minutes.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,808
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    I also recommend making your own salad dressing--I really don't like the store bought stuff and throwing together a dressing where you can control the ingredients takes just a few minutes.
    ITA. Same for soups -- canned soup never enters our house for use a soup or an ingredient. The condensed ones contain way too much sodium and fat (even most of the "low sodium" are really just "lower sodium"), and you can put together your own sauce in little time and with much more delicious results. And for homemade soups, not only is it fun and creative, the results are soooo much tastier.

    Mind you, some people still prefer the taste of processed foods over real food with natural ingredients. It's baffling to me, but there's a reason it's a multi-gazillion $ industry.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Top Secret FSU Witness Protection Location
    Age
    32
    Posts
    20,724
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    35872
    We found a really great and cheap specialty meats place nearby. We bought a meatloaf for $8.00, a package of fresh frozen broccoli for $2.00 and a premade thing of mashed potatoes for $4.00. This made us each a sizeable dinner and had enough leftovers for a lunch for each of us. The cost per serving was only around $3.50! Not bad, at all. Tonight we are trying a stuffed chicken (stuffed with broccoli and rice!) with some purple hull peas we bought there. It will be a little more per serving because of the chicken but we are using bread we have in the freezer as our 3rd side so that cuts the cost. We are going to be shopping there a lot as we are not good cooks!
    -Brian
    "Michelle would never be caught with sausage grease staining her Vera Wang." - rfisher

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Age
    50
    Posts
    2,106
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    466
    I recently invested in a food slicer. It was about $100, and I now save a bunch of money and, at the same time, maintain healthier lunches.

    I buy roasts on sale, season and roast them in the oven, then refrigerate them until firm. Slicing them is a breeze, and I then package them (maybe 5-6 slices at the time) in freezer bags with a spoonful of broth to maintain moistness. These serve us well for homemade lunchmeat. They're extremely filling on sandwiches - we actually feel as though we've eaten more of a meal with this sliced meat than with coldcuts from the deli.

    So far, I've done sirloin tip roast, thick chicken breasts, ham roast, and turkey breast (boneless). When you consider that these items at a deli can run up to $8 PER POUND, spending $12 to $18 for a 4-5 pound roast really stretches the dollar. I also made my own French Dip sandwiches with sliced roast and a little au jus.

    The trick of freezing them individually like that works out well - as we finish or nearly finish one bag, I grab another one out of the freezer and put it into the fridge to thaw. It's ready for the next day's lunches, and I can control how much is in the fridge without any of the meat spoiling.

    I've also used the slicer on potatoes. I thick-sliced some potatoes, brushed both sides with olive oil, seasoned them, and roasted them in the oven until brown (sometimes crispy). Homemade "fries" of a sort, and the olive oil absorbing into the potatoes make them moist and flavorful, and are a healthier alternative to butter, sour cream, etc.

    The slicer is supposed to work on bread, but I haven't tried that yet. I have used it on cheese, but it's really hard for me to find large blocks of cheese at the store (most are thin blocks that don't yield many slices). Still, block cheese that you slice yourself is much less expensive.
    Give me one more quiet night, before this loud morning gets it right, and does me in.
    ~DC

  6. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Plotting
    Age
    49
    Posts
    10,334
    vCash
    510
    Rep Power
    0
    Kruss - it's a small world, I bought that exact slicer for my ex bf as a birthday present. He loved the thing. My dad had a slicer, I'd buy 1/2 a boneless ham to bake and he'd steal it to make sandwiches.

    We do breakfast for dinner here sometimes too - last night I made waffles with bacon on the side. Used 1/2 the bacon with dinner and saved the other half to make bacon cheeseburgers tonight. I hate store made burger rolls, so I buy a big bag of ciabatta rolls from BJs (12 for about $4.50) and we use them for sandwiches, burgers, garlic bread... Now I'm off to find a recipe to make them at home and see if we can do it cheaper.

    Anyone have a recipe for homemade ranch dressing?

  7. #27
    From the Bloc
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    California, I wish
    Posts
    17,379
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11617
    Another vote for a meat slicer!

    Badams posted about a wonderful sandwich that's a favourite in Buffalo (and you thought they only ate chicken wings ). "Beef on Weck" is thin sliced beef and horseradish served on a weck roll, which is sort of a kaiser with pretzel salt and caraway seeds on top, and you dip it in the hot jus, with a giant pickle on the side. We can't get the rolls, so instead we toast caraway seeds, crush them lightly and mix them into sweet butter with sea salt, spread on ciabatta, and go from there. It's FANTASTIC - I barely eat meat any more, but this is where I make an exception about once per month.

    We've also used our slicer for chicken to make banh mi sandwiches. I just can't imagine buying pre-sliced or even sliced at the deli meat any more - too salty and preserved, and how long has that meat been there anyway? Yuck!

  8. #28
    From the Bloc
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    California, I wish
    Posts
    17,379
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11617
    Quote Originally Posted by dbell1 View Post
    Anyone have a recipe for homemade ranch dressing?
    Yes! This is from Screen Doors and Sweet Tea by Martha Hall Foose, a book I absolutely adore. The measurements are a bit finicky, but in the book she describes how she tested it over and over and this is the one that people loved best - I've made it a dozen times or more, and love it.

    Buttermilk Dressing

    1/2 cup buttermilk
    2 tbsp sour cream
    2 tbsp mayo
    1/2 tsp minced chopped shallot
    1/2 tsp chopped chives
    1/2 tsp chopped parsley
    1/2 tsp thyme leaves
    1/2 tsp cider vinegar
    1/2 tsp sugar
    1/4 tsp salt
    1/8 tsp garlic powder

    It's thinner than bottled dressing, so if you like it thicker, adjust the first three ingredients. All you do is whisk it together, chill for an hour before serving, and it keeps for a week in the fridge.

    Bonus: if you make your own butter (which is remarkably easy), the byproduct is buttermilk, so if you really want to be homemade, start with that. Foose also has a recipe for homemade mayo which is yummy, so more bonus points! Both are easy to make if you have a Kitchenaid Stand Mixer, which I know many of you do

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Tourist central!
    Posts
    844
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    564
    Cyn, please post that recipe.

    I use my coupons and big freezer to save lots of $$. I buy a lot of pasta, cheap. I don't think I've paid more than twenty-five cents a pound in over a year. If you shop at Target, you can stack manufacturer and store coupons to save a bundle. My and get lots of treats, but I pay next to nothing for them doing that.

    Chili is always a favorite - it lasts for two meals, plus chili dogs the next day. And beef stew. Oh, and bbq beef - cheap cut of meat, bottle of cola, bottle of bbq sauce and in the crock pot all day. It will shred and is great in sandwiches.

    I buy meat in bulk at the grocery store. Every once in a while they have the whole top round on sale for $1.99 - I get to tell them how to cut/grind it. For about $25 I will get enough meat for fifteen meals, easy, when you count leftovers.

    I also premake and freeze meatloaf and meatballs. I don't even cook them, just mix up and freeze raw. For meatballs, I chuck them into the pasta sauce and heat for about 30 minutes, until they are at least 165 degrees F inside. I defrost meatloaf and then just cook it that night. I've got meatballs on the stove now......

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,752
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I make sauces and soups from scratch, ftr, except for occasionally using a can for another recipe. I don't even have a recipe for pasta sauces or most soups or meat loaf/meat balls or lasagna sauce. In fact, I don't have a recipe for most things I make. Or I started with one and changed it up and never look at the recipe anymore--that would be the case with lemon chicken and alfredo and spaghetti carbonara and most stir fries. I think the best way to cook is by taste with as many fresh ingredients as possible.

    Recently, I have made breakfast sandwiches at home. They are much better than what you can buy. I use ham or bacon, cheese and scrambled egg (scramble with milk in a bowl, but don't break it up as you cook it--just cook like an omelet without folding--when you turn the eggs, put thin slices of cheddar on top to melt) on toasted English muffins. My husband doesn't want to go out for them anymore--so beware you may ruin getting to go out for breakfast!

    I have read that it is better to freeze meatballs or meat loaf raw as Christina suggests because the flavor doesn't "hold" as well if you freeze beef or pork cooked.

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    8,143
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I think a lot of it is where you buy something. Trader Joe's saves me a lot of money. There is food I see there that is sigificantly less than the exact same product at the grocery store across the street, and a lot less than at stores like Whole Foods, though I do think that Whole Foods has gotten better in recent years for at least some products. (I can't eat gluten, and I was suprised to find that Whole Foods probably has the best prices for some gluten-free products; sometimes a girl just needs a sandwich.)

    I'm picky about the meat I eat, preferring pasture raised and organic, but it's expensive. I usually get deals buying in bulk or stock up when it's on sale.

    I also try to buy whatever is in season, partly because those fruits and vegetables tend to be less expensive. I've been getting great prices on apples and tangerines recently. I've come to know which vendors at the farmer's market have the best prices and best products, so I get relatively good prices for things like eggs, spinach, tomatoes, etc.

  12. #32
    Saint Smugpawski
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cutting Down Privet Because Food Prices Are Going Up Next Year
    Posts
    11,743
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    35114
    Here's a crock pot recipe for Eggplant & Chick Pea Stew that is so. effing. good. And cheap. I added some red pepper flakes into the mix to give it a little bite, skipped the spinach and served it over fettuccine instead of polenta and it's SO yummy. You can put it over anything - rice, couscous, whatever you've got on hand.

    Eggplant & Chick Pea Stew
    The fastest thing out of New Jersey since Tricky Nicky in a Muscovian handbasket

  13. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    12,996
    vCash
    450
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by PDilemma View Post

    Recently, I have made breakfast sandwiches at home. They are much better than what you can buy. I use ham or bacon, cheese and scrambled egg (scramble with milk in a bowl, but don't break it up as you cook it--just cook like an omelet without folding--when you turn the eggs, put thin slices of cheddar on top to melt) on toasted English muffins. My husband doesn't want to go out for them anymore--so beware you may ruin getting to go out for breakfast!

    And a slice of tomato! I personally must have the tomato! Breakfast sandwiches is an treat I make myself often at home. Even for a small supper if I've worked late and don't want to cook much. There's just something so good about the combo of egg, bacon, cheese and tomato on an english muffin. Whoever at MickeyD who thought of that first is a genius.

  14. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,752
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Norlite View Post
    And a slice of tomato! I personally must have the tomato! Breakfast sandwiches is an treat I make myself often at home. Even for a small supper if I've worked late and don't want to cook much. There's just something so good about the combo of egg, bacon, cheese and tomato on an english muffin. Whoever at MickeyD who thought of that first is a genius.
    I will once they are in season again. Too expensive and too low quality right now!

  15. #35
    Saint Smugpawski
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cutting Down Privet Because Food Prices Are Going Up Next Year
    Posts
    11,743
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    35114
    Ain't nothing worse than a mealy tomato.
    The fastest thing out of New Jersey since Tricky Nicky in a Muscovian handbasket

  16. #36

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    the rink of course!
    Posts
    3,214
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    830
    Quote Originally Posted by Norlite View Post
    And a slice of tomato! I personally must have the tomato! Breakfast sandwiches is an treat I make myself often at home. Even for a small supper if I've worked late and don't want to cook much. There's just something so good about the combo of egg, bacon, cheese and tomato on an english muffin. Whoever at MickeyD who thought of that first is a genius.
    I add spinach to mine...it wilts with the heat and is so tasty. Ground cayenne pepper or season salt also is good...
    "awwww....shades of Janet Lynn" - Dick Button on anyone who makes more than one mistake in their program.

  17. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Looking for cupcakes
    Posts
    30,765
    vCash
    5550
    Rep Power
    0
    I'm pretty sure it wasn't healthy but tonight's dinner was tasty. And could be a good fill teen age boys up.

    Polish sausage but into 1/4 inch slices, green peppers, red peppers, yellow peppers, onion,diced tomatoes, itatiian seasonings, garlic, parm cheese, motzella cheese with bowtie pasta.

  18. #38
    From the Bloc
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    California, I wish
    Posts
    17,379
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11617
    Quote Originally Posted by numbers123 View Post
    I'm pretty sure it wasn't healthy but tonight's dinner was tasty. And could be a good fill teen age boys up.

    Polish sausage but into 1/4 inch slices, green peppers, red peppers, yellow peppers, onion,diced tomatoes, itatiian seasonings, garlic, parm cheese, motzella cheese with bowtie pasta.
    Actually that sounds delicious! Sausage is not something we should probably have too often (all the salt, and potentially dodgy meat ingredients), but by mixing it in with all the veggies and loads of flavour, you can probably serve smaller servings of the sausage itself, and bonus, get your family eating more veggies. If you toss in olive oil rather than butter or cream sauce, even better.

    I've mentioned before that we've cut back on meat substantially in our house, and in my case, I've eliminated it almost entirely. Over time, we've found that splitting one serving of meat is plenty if we load up on the sides, and of course there's the cost savings (or, you can choose to spend the money on better quality meat if you like).

    Thomas Jefferson advised that meat should be considered a side dish, and I think he had the right idea.

  19. #39
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Plotting
    Age
    49
    Posts
    10,334
    vCash
    510
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Allskate View Post
    I think a lot of it is where you buy something. Trader Joe's saves me a lot of money. There is food I see there that is sigificantly less than the exact same product at the grocery store across the street, and a lot less than at stores like Whole Foods, though I do think that Whole Foods has gotten better in recent years for at least some products.
    Snipping this - I love TJ's prices for pasta, sauce and cheeses. Pizza dough is cheap too at .99 each (and yep, I know I should buy yeast and make my own). Not a fan of their produce or veggies though. Their Belgium chocolate is to die for and their hot dogs are amazing - smokey and nitrate free. TJ's cocoa powder is 1/2 the price of Hershey's.

    Oh, and I love my local farmer's market in season. I can walk in with $10 and walk out with a hernia and a ton of food.

  20. #40

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    48
    Posts
    17,943
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    37723
    Potato pancakes - egg, grated potato, grated parmesan cheese, bit of milk, flour to bind and cook in olive oil. Put the grated potato for a minute in the microwave just to cook it a bit before mixing.

    If you want the more expensive version, add smoked salmon on top and a dollop of hollandaise sauce.

    You can do the same with corn. Creamed corn works better.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •