Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 37 of 37
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Not after the same people as Theatregirl
    Posts
    21,933
    vCash
    350
    Rep Power
    37378
    In the jury pool, during voir dire, it was clear that some people were doing their best to get out of jury duty. But those of us that were chosen, while not thrilled, took the case and our duty very seriously. And even though it was a murder case, yes, some of it was very boring, but so what? We were deciding if a guy was going to jail for at least 20 years. I sucked it up and paid attention. It's part of being a citizen.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Looking for cupcakes
    Posts
    30,765
    vCash
    5550
    Rep Power
    0
    I see it as a small price to pay for the freedom we have. Rather than having a dictator type governnment who decides if you are not guillty or guilty, we have the opportunity to be heard by a body of our peers. If I was charged with something, I hope to have a fair and honest jury. But I see serving on a jury a small price to pay

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Age
    50
    Posts
    2,104
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    466
    I've been called twice. The first time I sat reading a book all day - they never called me in.

    The second time was last winter. It was a criminal case (unlawful discharge of a weapon near a school). I was among the first group to be called in, and during questioning of other potential jurors, I pretty much figured out I'd be dismissed. Three of the main questions were: Do you believe the police can make mistakes and possibly arrest the wrong person? Do you know any law enforcement officials? If so, do they discuss their cases with you?

    Everyone's answer to #1 was "yes, everyone can make a mistake". Everyone who answered yes to knowing a law enforcement official then stated the person they know never discusses their cases.

    When they came to my group for questioning, I saw the two defense attorneys looking at the juror information sheets, whispering to each other and pointing at me. I knew I was going to be dismissed even before I was asked any questions.

    My responses were, yes, anyone can make a mistake, yes, I know law officials (cousin is a cop, I work in a law office with 42 attorneys), and yes, the people I know discuss their cases all the time, and I even find it very interesting.

    Dismissed. I didn't lie, I'm just the one who told the truth about law officials discussing their cases.

    I work around the law everyday and have for over 23 years. Yet it's interesting that even though I knew I would remain impartial and fair had I been chosen, it was surprising to me that I'd already started forming opinions of the defendant based on his attorneys' questions. Which I knew I'd have to disregard said opinions if I was to be fair during the trial. But of course, I never got the chance. I was driving home by 10:30 that morning.
    Give me one more quiet night, before this loud morning gets it right, and does me in.
    ~DC

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    3,378
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    My sister has a total of 2 kids. When she got called for jury duty, the date was on her due date for her first child. She provided doctor's documentation confirming this, and was excused.

    3 years later, she was called again. Coincidentally, she was about 2 weeks away from her due date with her second child. She showed up because she figured she'd only get a quick day long case or be dismissed. However she was called to do a multi-week case. When she pointed out that she would be delivering her child in about 2 weeks, the judge refused to excuse her on the basis that her being pregnant was the "excuse" she used last time to get out of jury duty. She pointed out the fact that this was only her second pregnancy and she wasn't bearing children for the sole purpose of avoiding jury duty - especially when one doesn't know when they'll be called. He refused again and made her part of the jury.

    Sure enough, ten days later in the middle of testimony, her water breaks right in the jury box and they have to stop the proceedings to allow her to go to the hospital. It was quite a spectacle. I imagine the alternate was called in. My BIL and sister were fuming mad! They wrote a letter of complaint against the judge, not that we ever found out if he was censured for his actions.

    ETA: I always appear when called, and wouldn't mind actually being on a jury. I think it would be interesting. But it's never happened yet.

  5. #25
    fragrance free
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    between here and there
    Posts
    1,469
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    12924
    I've only been called for jury duty once. It was for federal court and was for a five month period. About once a month I'd get a postcard in the mail with a number to call on the evening of a certain date. The number would have a prerecorded message to either report the next day or that the jury draw had been canceled (cases settled before trial). Only once did I have to go in. I was never picked in the initial group of potential jurors. The last case involved someone many of the potential jurors knew and they did not get enough jurors from the first group drawn so they drew again. I was selected in this group but didn't even get questioned as they filled the jury and alternate spots before they got to me.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    In my own little fantasy world where life is perfect for me!
    Posts
    5,835
    vCash
    4511
    Rep Power
    10351
    I've been called twice, but never served. First in like 1988 I was called for, I think it was some kind of special jury duty, for a specific murder case. We sat there for about 3-4 hours and then they told us the defendant agreed to a plea deal (or something like that) and no trial would take place.

    Second time about 2003, had to go in, fill out the survey form, sat there about 3-4 hours again and entire group was released. I think that was a specific trial again.

    Can you volunteer to be on jury duty? There is a case in my city that is on its 3rd trial (murder case) that I so want to be on the jury for. I am completely impartial on the case too, really can't decide if it was murder or an accident based on what's been reported (apparently neither could the first two juries). I want to hear all the evidence in the case. I would be a good juror for either side. How can I volunteer for that case?

  7. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Celebrating Jeremy Abbott's FS at 2014 Worlds...
    Posts
    21,222
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I've been summoned 5 times - 4 in Atlanta and once in the small town where we live.

    Twice (in Atlanta) I've gone through voir dire, and both times disqualified.

    The first was a civil court case involving a car accident in which an elderly man hit a car in which a 19 year-old female was riding. She had suffered a TBI and as a result, the other driver was being sued. She, however, was not wearing her seat belt but had she done so, she would not have suffered the brain injury. At the time of this, it was 3 weeks after my BF had died in an automobile accident in which he would have survived had he been wearing his seatbelt, so I was immediately cut from the jury pool by the plaintiff's counsel.

    The second case I went through voir dire was for a class action lawsuit regarding the raising of property taxes (astronomical) in Fulton County. During voir dire, I had to disclose that my parents were included as part of the class action lawsuit, so needless to say I was not eligible to sit in on that one.

    The other two times I was summoned - I spent one day sitting on my ass, reading a book and avoid being snotted on by the man with some sort of plague sitting next to me in the general waiting area and hoping to god I didn't catch whatever he had. The other time, summonees were given a phone number to call the night before to find out if our jury pool would have to show up - my group didn't.

    The one time I've been summoned since moving to north Georgia, I showed up, but had a horrid stomach virus and was having to run to the loo to hurl every 20 minutes . I was excused, but because I showed up and signed in, I met my jury duty obligation.

    I figure in GA, jury selection must be tied to voter registration. Although I had lived here for well over a year, I hadn't changed the address on my driver's license, but had registered to vote, and within a few months of actually voting in a local election, I was summoned to serve in this county.

    As most people who have served know, most cases are boring and tedious. That being said, after reading Helter Skelter, I willingly go to serve as I would find it interesting to serve on a major criminal case, even if it meant being sequestered.

    Did anyone here ever see the HBO documentary called "Juror #5?" It re-creates Deena Mullen's experience (from her perspective) as one of the jurors from the O.J. Simpson civil trial (it was written and told by Mullen herself). The mini-review linked above gives a good description of this one-hour film and gives the viewer an excellent idea of how draining, trying, and grueling that kind of jury duty can be while at the same time delivering the message of the importance and responsibilities a juror is compelled to adhere to in this civic duty. I used to have it on video tape but left it at someone's house in Seattle back in 2002 . I've looked for it to order but cannot find it anywhere (double ).
    Last edited by Cyn; 01-16-2011 at 03:45 PM.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Age
    53
    Posts
    10,467
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    20970
    I've been summoned for jury duty three times.

    The first was about 20 years ago, during a period when I was unemployed/temping and between semesters in grad school, so I could have used the $30/day per diem or whatever it was they paid. But I only went the first day, was called in for jury selection for one trial, not chosen, and then sent home at the end of that day.

    The other times were more recently, about 5 and 1.5 years ago. The first was a civil case involving mediacl fees resulting from a car accident (the plaintiff was not very credible, so we ended up awarding a lot less than she asked for).

    The second was a criminal trial for attempted murder (second degree, as part of a general brawl). The prosecution made a pretty weak circumstantial case but couldn't definitively put the weapon in the hands of the accused. The defense didn't even bother to make a case. Lots of reasonable doubt, so we had to acquit, even though we thought there was a better than 50-50 chance the defendent had done what he was accused of doing. He was very grateful when he heard the verdict.

    Fortunately the victim seemed to be recovering nicely and I hope if the defendent was guilty that he learned his lesson, that everyone involved learned lessons about getting involved in group brawls.

  9. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Main floor
    Posts
    2,459
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Because you don't want to face Geraldo Rivera on Court TV!

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In the middle of a hair war with Alena Leonova.
    Posts
    2,554
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    In theory, I would love to be on a jury of at least one interesting case, just to see how it really works (away from my 7th grade mock trial as a prosecutor). But yeah - the courthouse I'd get called to around here is really hard to get to, and my job (and probably most jobs) doesn't really let one miss work all that easily.

    The one time I had to actually sit in court and wait to be selected was during finals time in college. I actually went to the courthouse in advance to tell them, and they said I could defer, but not be excused. I didn't realize that the person telling me I could defer for 6 months, even though I wouldn't be living there, was just stating fact - I could have just deferred and then not been summoned. Most other students completely ignored the summons.

    It was the most boring civil trial ever - one angry neighbor wanted to sue another neighbor because part of their ritzy seaside cliff yard tumbled into the sea and therefore compromised the property value, or something.

    One time my friend was on the CRAZIEST trial ever - Uncle Pookie was fixing developmentally-disabled nephew Boochie's bike in the driveway when a car drove up and SHOT HIM IN THE FACE. Boochie was the only witness, but it was really hard to get coherent testimony out of him! During the selection process, my friend said, "Err, I'm a chemist, so yes, I have knowledge of forensics." Down the row, "Err, I'm a German physicist." Both of them were selected. Later they were taken by the bailiff to the most amazing gingerbread house soul food restaurant ever, which is now defunct.

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Looking for cupcakes
    Posts
    30,765
    vCash
    5550
    Rep Power
    0
    Quintuple - I believe by law your employer is required to release you for jury duty.

  12. #32

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Not after the same people as Theatregirl
    Posts
    21,933
    vCash
    350
    Rep Power
    37378
    Quote Originally Posted by Quintuple View Post
    In theory, I would love to be on a jury of at least one interesting case, just to see how it really works (away from my 7th grade mock trial as a prosecutor). But yeah - the courthouse I'd get called to around here is really hard to get to, and my job (and probably most jobs) doesn't really let one miss work all that easily.
    Yes, missing three days of teaching sucked. Making three days of sub plans sucked. But I dealt with it, and I'll clean up the mess tomorrow.

  13. #33

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Age
    33
    Posts
    2,202
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    468
    Yeah, you can't get out of jury duty due to work. If you're summoned, you have to serve. And your employer can't fire you for missing work due to jury duty. Mine gave me a lot of crap and I got some passive aggressive scutwork for a few days after I came back, but there's nothing they could have done to get me out of it.

    I got my first jury duty summons less than a month after I graduated college, so if I had gotten the summons a few weeks before I would have been exempt. I got picked as well, and my trial SUCKED. A teenager was arrested for selling pot to a narc at the local high school. It was like a 21 Jump Street thing. But anyways, many of my fellow jurors went into 12 Angry Men mode and we argued for.ev.er. The judge estimated it as a one-day trial, but it was dragged out to three days. If I ever have to get into a metaphysical screeching match with complete strangers about the very meaning of law, and if government and police are even necessary again, so help me... that was painful!

    I got a second summons two months after my first one, which almost made me faint. Not THAT crap again! But I called the court house to tell them that I had already served less than six months before, and they told me to send in the summons notice with the dates of my last trial and that I wouldn't have to show up to the jury pool.

  14. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Plotting
    Age
    49
    Posts
    10,332
    vCash
    510
    Rep Power
    0
    3 years ago, my dad was summoned for jury duty. He was in a nursing home recovering from losing his second leg. They wrote back that he had a permanent excuse and he was being taken off the list permanently. Saturday, he was summoned again. He died 2 1/2 years ago. I wrote back that I'd be happy to send his ashes, enclosed his death certificate and told them to go away. I'm betting on another notice in 2 years.

    I was summoned about a year ago. Sat there, read a book, went to a 2 hour lunch and got sent home. That was it.

  15. #35
    Tranquillo
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    behind the gruppetto
    Posts
    24,967
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    38362
    I've been called twice and my main complaint is how far away the court is. In order to be sure I get there on time, I have to leave at least 2.5 hours for travel from my house to the courthouse(the trip would take about 2 hours one way even under good conditions). I didn't get picked either time, but I was particularly glad on the second time, since the trial was supposed to take at least 6 weeks.

    On the plus side, I have to give credit to the people who worked at the courthouses. They hear every excuse in the book and everyone seems to be mad at them just for doing their job, but they were really professional, treated everyone nicely and had a very organized system.

    The waiting area was as comfortable as could be expected, and between the travel expenses and the daily pay, the amount I got each day was actually pretty good. I could see why some retired or unemployed people wouldn't mind going. Plus, alhough there were a few jerks, the majority of the other jurors were really nice and I enjoyed the voir dire because some people had very interesting jobs.
    "The Devil is joining in, and that's never a good sign." Phil Liggett

  16. #36
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,804
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyn View Post
    ... I spent one day sitting on my ass, reading a book and avoid being snotted on by the man with some sort of plague sitting next to me in the general waiting area and hoping to god I didn't catch whatever he had.
    Ok, that made me just to see the word "snot" being used as a verb!

  17. #37

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    4,077
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    223
    We've never been called for local jury duty. But several times my husband has been called for state jury duty. It always falls on times when he can not miss work (no one can do his job!) except the last time. They didn't excuse him and he was going to have to go and then he got a notice that he didn't have to show up because the case was settled.

    My kids were little when I got my questionaire for the state. I was filling it out and one question was "are you responisble for more than half of the care of small children or elderly?" I was 90% responsible for my kids because of my husnband's job. Never heard anything from them again. Fully expecting to at any time because it's been 12 yrs.

    I know here it's driver's license because my mom is not a registered voter and she got summoned. She didn't have to go because the case was settled out of court and her group was dismissed. My dad....he loves to serve on it and actually will go volunteer to be called but he's only ever been once.
    Have you hugged your kids and told them you love them today?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •