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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupid View Post
    Like a friend's grandma used to say, "you can take a jackass all around the world, but when it gets back, it's still a jackass."
    and sadly some people that jackass met overseas will judge everyone from that jackass' home country based on the jackass' jackassedness!

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelskates View Post
    Travelling does not make one intelligent. It's very easy to travel and not learn anything from the new culture, people and geographic location; I see it all the time.
    I didn't say it made you intelligent, I said if you wanted to learn more, it could help.

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by *Jen* View Post
    I didn't say it made you intelligent...
    I never said you did. You did, in effect, say that there was nothing to stop us from travelling and seeing the world, and I think there are plenty of things, which I pointed out. Most people would probably love to travel more, and would love to travel and learn from their travel, but it's just not possible. There are so many things that stop us, and they're valid things.

  4. #64

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    Very interesting thread and I agree with a lot of what's been written here. I have a Ph.D. in chemistry and a M.A. in psychology. So, I have a lot of education in certain areas but I don't know everything there is to know about everything! Especially in today's world, you just can't know all there is to know. So, for me, intelligence is a lot about your capability to learn new things, to grasp new concepts, and come up with new insights, and the speed at which you can do this. One of the smartest guys I know, a physicist btw, really epitomizes this. He will listen to someone talk about a subject about which he knows little, and he will see the key points and ask the key questions. Oh, and I'm pretty sure he knows how to count and knows his alphabet, too! (He's also turning into a Mac guy, partly due to my influence. )

    But if you don't have formal education, of course it doesn't mean you aren't smart. I do know many Ph.D.'s who look down at others who don't even have a college degree. There is a guy at work who is currently taking Six Sigma black belt training and he does not have a college degree at all, and I'm just that he is able to get through all this. I lent him a good basic statistics book and he keeps coming to my office to thank me. So, he's smart and has good manners, too! The guy who works with me day-to-day has an associates degree and is currently taking college classes part time. He is very smart and I am so glad he is working with me, as we each have our own areas of expertise and so we really are collaborating. I am always trying to think of more challenging things for him to work on, to keep him interested and continuing to learn, and so he'll be more inclined to want to keep working with me. So far, so good.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by TripleToeClean View Post
    Coming out of a long period of lurkdom...
    I'm only 17, so my credentials aren't too impressive, but I'm a first year university student working toward degrees in dance performance and social justice.
    I didn't know you could get a degree in social justice. Very cool!

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by sk8pics View Post
    He will listen to someone talk about a subject about which he knows little, and he will see the key points and ask the key questions.
    Such a key skill to learning anything, both academically and in life.

  7. #67
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    great thread! to answer the original question, I recently ended my master and I'm now trying/hoping to get a PhD, but I still am a bit confused about that...those days my main concern is "will my English be sufficient to get in?"...aargh!

    BTW, I can hardly park a car, always calling my (younger) brother to park it in our garage!

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by sk8er1964 View Post
    IMO, a degree doesn't necessarily make you more intelligent, but it does make you more marketable.
    Probably true for bachelor's degrees, but grad degrees could actually make you less marketable in some fields, especially for entry level positions in fields that are required to pay higher salaries to people with higher degrees.

  9. #69
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    I just have a BA in English/Sociology, and I admit that I have status anxiety about this. Most of my friends have their masters (one has a PhD), and my husband has a master's and a JD (he's a lawyer.)
    Last edited by Veronika; 01-08-2011 at 03:47 PM.

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelskates View Post
    Such a key skill to learning anything, both academically and in life.
    Very true.

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by gkelly View Post
    Probably true for bachelor's degrees, but grad degrees could actually make you less marketable in some fields, especially for entry level positions in fields that are required to pay higher salaries to people with higher degrees.
    I can see your point, but I still think a masters helps far more than it hurts in most fields. In mine, a masters now is the leg up that a bachelors used to be 20 years ago.

    However, PhD's maybe not so much. When we were hiring an assistant manager, we had an amazing amount of people with PhD's apply. We pretty much rejected all of them because why would someone with a PhD want to be an assistant manager? We figured they'd be there for six months, a year, and then move on to something more suited to their degree and that's not what we wanted in that postition. Unfair? Absolutely - but when you get 70+ resumes for a $35k/year position you can afford to be brutal. Maybe they should have left that part of their education off their resume. (Our hiree ended up being a young woman with a masters degree.)

  12. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by rfisher View Post
    Never think your level of formal education makes you either smart or stupid.
    So, so true.

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by agalisgv View Post

    (FWIW, I can't tell my left from my right, and gave up trying a long time ago. Someone told me about the "L" thing, but since I couldn't remember which way an "L" is supposed to go, that didn't help. I also can't remember the alphabet in any language unless I sing it. I can count though )
    Well, the left and right thing is interesting. I usually can tell left and right but almost got killed in England where they drive on the wrong side of the street. The huge lettering on the ground directing to look right and then left did not have a slightest effect.

    I still can't cross the road there, let alone drive. It's horrifyingly confusing.
    OTOH, I was pretty good at stereochemistry and never had to build the ball and stick models. I could walk around the molecule in my head and would actually walk around my seat to see the back of the molecule in my head. It's weird.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  14. #74

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    I have a PhD in engineering, yet I am pretty miserable when it comes to building or fixing things. My 7 year old even prefers to do his lego sets without me. He says he can do it faster by himself.
    Creating drama!

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffisjeff View Post
    I have a PhD in engineering, yet I am pretty miserable when it comes to building or fixing things. My 7 year old even prefers to do his lego sets without me. He says he can do it faster by himself.
    I can't even begin to do Legos. Once my son and his buddy asked me to help them with their Lego set and I was completely lost. It was rather humiliating.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  16. #76
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    I have only a high school diploma but spent my working life in banking. I trained a lot of people over the years (I'm 75) & some of the dumbest &/or laziest were college graduates. I've never felt inferior because I don't have a college degree.

  17. #77
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    I was having this discussion with someone where I brought up the fake Larry Ellison commencement address about being too educated to make a fortune, all about college dropouts like Bill Gates. And now he could have added Mark Zuckerberg.

    I was wondering about that: does being over-educated prevent you from just going for it if you have a creative idea? In higher education we are trained to doubt, so would that, in some cases be an impediment to pursuing a very specific creative goal?

    I am certainly not arguing against education. I always encourage it but this thought has been in the back of my mind for a while.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  18. #78
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    I think many take the college path because it's a safe choice, so some people who are comfortable with safe choices don't achieve greatness. And people like Gates took a big risk and it paid off for him.

    Not going to college is a big risk but a talented risk taker can pull it off.

  19. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    I was wondering about that: does being over-educated prevent you from just going for it if you have a creative idea? In higher education we are trained to doubt, so would that, in some cases be an impediment to pursuing a very specific creative goal?
    I think the longer you are in a "system", the more likely you are to start conforming to the system. For example, in our area, Boston College is known for churning out lawyer/politicians. There's a better than 50% chance that a triple Eagle (HS, undergrad, grad school) is a politician. That's not to say that many BC grads are in other fields, including creative ones, it's just that BC's system puts many people on the same path.
    AceOn6, the golf loving skating fan

  20. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    I was wondering about that: does being over-educated prevent you from just going for it if you have a creative idea? In higher education we are trained to doubt, so would that, in some cases be an impediment to pursuing a very specific creative goal?

    I am certainly not arguing against education. I always encourage it but this thought has been in the back of my mind for a while.
    I think it just depends on the person. The ability to think in 3D is not something you can ever be taught, you just have it. And it applies to many things. For instance, one of the smartest people I've ever met was a self taught master carpenter. He could design things I'd never even thought about. He had the ability to *see* what he wanted to build from start to finish.

    Just ramblin..........ignore.

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