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  1. #21
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    Inline/roller blades are similar to figure skates if you're just doing forward stroking and crossovers, so they are good for building strength and practicing stroking when you don't have ice available. BUT be very careful going backwards or doing mohawks! Stepping down backwards onto a figure skate you'd keep your weight forward on the blade so that the bottom pick digs in and keeps you from slipping. If you do that on roller blades. . . swoosh! BAM!! Hello concrete.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doubletoe View Post
    Inline/roller blades are similar to figure skates if you're just doing forward stroking and crossovers, so they are good for building strength and practicing stroking when you don't have ice available. BUT be very careful going backwards or doing mohawks! Stepping down backwards onto a figure skate you'd keep your weight forward on the blade so that the bottom pick digs in and keeps you from slipping. If you do that on roller blades. . . swoosh! BAM!! Hello concrete.
    When you skate forward the pressure is at the back of the skate (the heel), when you go backwards the pressure/weight is at the front of the foot (the toes). Is that what you mean?
    I guess the hard thing for a lot of people to accept is why God would allow me to go running through their yards, yelling and spinning around.


  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bunny_Hop View Post
    I was wondering whether using rollerblades just for normal stroking and maybe some crossovers would damage my ability to figure skate.
    I rollerblade all the time when it's not winter. I find it a good time to practice stroking - pushing all the way through the blade, putting feet back together. I never do crossovers, backward skating, or any other kind of trick. I would probably kill myself.

    I also kept the rear brake because, while I can do a t-stop, I rollerblade on a concrete trail and blades cannot dig into concrete.

  4. #24
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    Thanks for all the advice! I really want to get rollerblades now but I'll definitely be wearing all the knee/elbow/wrist/head protection I can get my hands on!

    Just another question: If I ordered rollerblades online, would it be similar to figure skate sizing in that it would be smaller than street shoe size? Thanks!

    Also, does the heel brake get in the way much when you're just doing ordinary stroking?

  5. #25
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    Where to Get Them

    Bunny Hop,

    I used an old pair of ice boots (Riedell) and had this shop remount them with inline (Snow White) frames. Artistic Inlines will run you anywhere between $75-800 depending on what you want them for. Because I used my regular boot I never needed to know if they run small. But this is a great site SK8gear http://shopskategear.com/

    There is an entry level inline that should be good enough for crossovers/edges etc. It only comes in black, and it says use US men's sizes. Funny, but I have never seen these beginner level skates in white. See this video. The skater is wearing them. It gives you a good idea at what they are capable of. http://<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/zbpsasgTdEg?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/zbpsasgTdEg?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

    She has very good speed and flow. Nice! Looks like she had some ice training. But notice the inlines. They are the basic black beginner. So the skates are capable of these types of movements.They seem like they are fine for stoking and lower level jumps. Like ice, the high priced ones are mainly for high level tricks, so don't worry about them. If you have an older pair of ice boots you can just buy the frames and have them mounted (like I did) so you will know that they will fit. If you have any questions click on the link for "Contact US" written across the top of the home page. She is usually very good about getting back to you.

    Yes, definitely use lots of pads. And be careful. If you can, skate in a roller rink. (They usually let people do "tricks" in the middle during sessions.) Some outdoor skateparks require helmets (which might not be a bad idea, especially at first). Good luck & have fun!!!!

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ozzisk8tr View Post
    When you skate forward the pressure is at the back of the skate (the heel), when you go backwards the pressure/weight is at the front of the foot (the toes). Is that what you mean?
    Yes, when skating backward in figure skates, putting your weight further forward (between the ball of the foot and the toes) will actually help save you from falling because you have a toepick. But putting your weight forward while going backward on rollerblades will make you roll right over your front wheel and go down. The biggest danger, IMO, is doing a mohawk in rollerblads--going from a forward edge on one foot to a backward edge on the other.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bunny_Hop View Post
    Just another question: If I ordered rollerblades online, would it be similar to figure skate sizing in that it would be smaller than street shoe size? Thanks!

    Also, does the heel brake get in the way much when you're just doing ordinary stroking?
    Rollerblade sizing is completely different from figure skate sizing. Also, if they are stiff plastic rollerblades, they will never break in and conform to the shape of your foot like leather skates will, so there's no sense in getting them tight/small. The brake doesn't get in the way. You will probably find it very comfortable and easy to use.

  7. #27
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    Yay! Walked into the second hand shop and there were two identical pairs of inlines. One was size 7, exactly my size. Tried them on and fell in love with them!

    They're very lightly used -- more dusty than scratched. They're called Softecs (I don't think the same as the ice skate brand) -- they feel like sneakers but there's a bit of ankle support. I'll never be able to jump in them or anything, but on the upside there is a fair amount of forward ankle bend, so I won't get unaccustomed to bending my knees. They have 3 lace holes and two hooks, plus a velcro strap over the top of the foot and another one around the ankle.

    I waddled around the second hand shop in them for a while, and have also tried them for about 20 minutes on my pavers. The main difference I noticed, other than the softness thing, is the heat! It gets so hot inside skates when you're outside an ice rink.

    I haven't tried them for long yet, but did a few laps of marching, then step and glide and something vaguely resembling stroking. It's impossible to get a long glide on the bumpy pavers, so I shall have to find a quiet street/carpark. However, the washing on the line was getting in the way, so I'll have more space when I move that.

    Thanks for all the advice! I'll keep everyone updated on my inline skating (mis)adventures.

  8. #28
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    A quick word of advice when you take your new rollerblades out on the open road: Keep your eyes open for sticks, small rocks, and other outdoor debris. These will stop your wheels before you even know why you are sitting on the ground. Also, if you are blading on a trail that has lanes separated by paint (like on the road), stay away from the paint if the pavement is even a little wet. That paint gets very slippery and I've seen many rollerblader and cyclists wipe out!

  9. #29
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    A quick word of advice when you take your new rollerblades out on the open road: Keep your eyes open for sticks, small rocks, and other outdoor debris. These will stop your wheels before you even know why you are sitting on the ground. Also, if you are blading on a trail that has lanes separated by paint (like on the road), stay away from the paint if the pavement is even a little wet. That paint gets very slippery and I've seen many rollerblader and cyclists wipe out!
    Thanks!

    I swept ("Zambonied") the pavers well before rollerblading. Like skating, I just accept that I'm going to fall sometimes. And I'm wearing lots of padding for rollerblading that I don't have for skating. I'm a bit worried about my tail though (I fractured it as a kid). Could I use a waxel pad/other padding for it?

  10. #30
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    i would just use the normal rollerblades for cardio fitness.. an hour in your neighborhood or in the park is great exercise AND FREE. no ice time bills. i tried the roller cages with a rubber pik on toe mounted to old figure boots many years ago.. and it was novel but NOT THE SAME TECHNIQUE.. you are always on the round of the wheels, instead of on an edge.. ROLLERBLADES NOT GOOD FOR TECHNIQUE...BUT GOOD FOR FITNESS.
    easier on joints than jogging

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