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  1. #81
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    Deep edges are simple physics. A motorcycle going 60 mph is going to lean into a curve more than one going 30 mph. Deep edges are a byproduct of speed. In reference to Trixie Schuba, school figures don't move fast enough to generate natural edges. Like all of us ancient figure folks, Trixie contrived the edges by forcing her ankles over.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spikydurian View Post
    Was lurking in the archives to read something of interest and found this!
    What a gem. Still don't quite fully comprehend 'deep edges' but getting there.
    I think this ice dance couple illustrates deep edges very well. At one point, there is a closeup of their feet and you can really see the lean on the edges.

    Bestimianova and Bukin 1988 Olympics Kilian CD

    This is why I miss compulsory dances. They really separated the great from the good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pollyanna View Post
    I think this ice dance couple illustrates deep edges very well. At one point, there is a closeup of their feet and you can really see the lean on the edges.

    Bestimianova and Bukin 1988 Olympics Kilian CD

    This is why I miss compulsory dances. They really separated the great from the good.
    One of my favorite CD ever. This Killian is amazing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pollyanna View Post
    ........This is why I miss compulsory dances. They really separated the great from the good.
    ........and created a level playing field.

    Nice clean Kilian. No frills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pollyanna View Post
    I think this ice dance couple illustrates deep edges very well. At one point, there is a closeup of their feet and you can really see the lean on the edges.

    Bestimianova and Bukin 1988 Olympics Kilian CD

    This is why I miss compulsory dances. They really separated the great from the good.
    Thanks Pollyanna. Wow.. the close-up was great. I can see the lean you are talking about. Their steps were soooooo in sync and close together too.

    I guess compulsory dances allow apples to be compared with apples hence it's probably easier for non-skaters like me to 'see' the difference? A trained eye and skater won't need compulsories to pick these differences?

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    Quote Originally Posted by spikydurian View Post
    Thanks Pollyanna. Wow.. the close-up was great. I can see the lean you are talking about. Their steps were soooooo in sync and close together too.

    I guess compulsory dances allow apples to be compared with apples hence it's probably easier for non-skaters like me to 'see' the difference? A trained eye and skater won't need compulsories to pick these differences?
    Someone on here once said that compulsories allowed you to see the boys and girls from the men and women. Watching the compulsories of the greats like B/B or T/D, I can see why that poster said that.
    "If people are looking for guarantees, they should buy appliances at Sears and stay away from human relationships."~Prancer

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    Quote Originally Posted by spikydurian View Post
    I guess compulsory dances allow apples to be compared with apples hence it's probably easier for non-skaters like me to 'see' the difference? A trained eye and skater won't need compulsories to pick these differences?
    Not necessarily. In short/original dances and free dances, you can do a lot of...let's say, distractions ;P with your upper body to divert attention away from weak edges, and use choreography to play up your strengths and hide your weaknesses. So even a trained eye can be distracted. But you can't get away with that in the compulsory dances. If the pattern says you do a right outside three-turn on that beat at that point in the pattern...you do it.

    One thing that did change in the CDs across the years, and not for the good IMHO, was allowing more upper body movement during the dance (e.g. changes of holds, arm movements) and more entry and exit steps. If you look at that B/B video, you'll notice that they start in a pose and then go straight into the dance, and don't do much in the upper body beyond the basic Kilian hold. Look at any recent CD on YouTube and you'll see a lot more fancy stuff going on before and after. I think this was an attempt by the ISU to make the CDs more interesting to watch, but IMHO it just let weak dancers distract more from their technical problems.
    You should never write words with numbers. Unless you're seven. Or your name is Prince. - "Weird Al" Yankovic, "Word Crimes"

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    This is a really interesting discussion, and I am learning a lot. Edgework is one of my favourite parts of figure skating, and I would love to become more proficient on my edges when I skate (recreationally). thanks for providing your insights

    Quote Originally Posted by sap5 View Post
    Sergei had the same technique as Katia, and his blades were not unusually big.

    I think you're right in that this style of skating requires extreme precision, as you are essentially skating on only a very small part of the blade all the time.
    Your comment reminded me of something I read in a Sports Illustrated article that came out shortly after Sergei died. When describing G&G's skating, John Nicks remarked:

    "They really are what pairs skating ought to be," John Nicks, a prominent U.S. coach, once said in describing Grinkov and Gordeeva at work. "They are the consummate pair. You can't appreciate the capacity of a 180-pound man to move across the ice without a sound until you watch him skate. They are a symphony for the senses. Go to practice one day. Don't watch them; just listen. Not a sound. No matter the ice condition, you hear only the music. They move so freely, their blades don't scratch the ice."

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vau...00/1/index.htm

  9. #89

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    Timely that this topic has been resurrected because I was only thinking today as I was skating about what it is about Patrick Chan that he has such sublime skating technique. It is effortless. What has he done to get it to that level? Or is he just a freak?
    I have not had the pleasure of seeing him live, only just watching the videos. I would love to hear from those who have watched him live as to what they notice when they have seen him live. Or if they know how it has developed.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Willy View Post
    Timely that this topic has been resurrected because I was only thinking today as I was skating about what it is about Patrick Chan that he has such sublime skating technique. It is effortless. What has he done to get it to that level? Or is he just a freak?
    I have not had the pleasure of seeing him live, only just watching the videos. I would love to hear from those who have watched him live as to what they notice when they have seen him live. Or if they know how it has developed.
    Chan was the only skater at 09 Worlds that I could not get a clear photograph of. He is SO fast!

    Watching him live is really a treat. Definitely do it if you get a chance! His speed is evident even during exhibitions. The last time I saw him live was the All That Skate show where he did the Coldplay program. Near the beginning, he does a series of crossovers and it was like watching someone take off and fly. I mean, skating is already kind of like flying, but he's effin' Superman out there. He makes it look so effortless.

    Another skater whom I didn't appreciate fully until watching live is Carolina Kostner. She doesn't have the kind of power Patrick has, but her balance on her blade is second to none. I could even see it while she was warming up with three-turns. She exerted a lot less effort on her blades than everyone else, and got more speed out of them. Again, she makes it look very easy.

    I think such superior use of the blade requires some amount of talent. Hard work too of course, but so few skaters show that level of mastery, so I'm pretty sure there's something internal about that as well.

  11. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Willy View Post
    Timely that this topic has been resurrected because I was only thinking today as I was skating about what it is about Patrick Chan that he has such sublime skating technique. It is effortless. What has he done to get it to that level? Or is he just a freak?
    I have not had the pleasure of seeing him live, only just watching the videos. I would love to hear from those who have watched him live as to what they notice when they have seen him live. Or if they know how it has developed.
    I was in the audience for his exhibition at SC 2010, and after seeing that I concluded that his technique is divinely bestowed

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Willy View Post
    Timely that this topic has been resurrected because I was only thinking today as I was skating about what it is about Patrick Chan that he has such sublime skating technique. It is effortless. What has he done to get it to that level? Or is he just a freak?
    I have not had the pleasure of seeing him live, only just watching the videos. I would love to hear from those who have watched him live as to what they notice when they have seen him live. Or if they know how it has developed.
    Patrick has openly dedicated his skating skills to his late coach, Mr Colson. He kind of said that without Mr Colson, he wouldn't be where he is today. (I teared on that part )

    Why is it that some skaters have great edges and some not? It is due to the different approach and emphasis in early training in the different countries?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bournekraatzfan View Post
    I was in the audience for his exhibition at SC 2010, and after seeing that I concluded that his technique is divinely bestowed
    I was in the audience for his 2011 Nationals LP and I second that his technique is divinely bestowed

    And thanks for the B/B link! That CD is mind blowing!

    You know, maybe they'll bring the CD's back. It's obviously an ever evolving system that hinges a lot on the feedback of experts and specialists. There must be a pool of individuals in power positions whom also believe in the value of the CD.

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    I remember reading an interview with Patrick years ago in which he said he was so excited about moving to Mr Colson because he thought he would start learning the big jumps but Mr Colson made him do nothing but patterns on the ice for a long time. I think the suspicion is that he was doing figures which would explain a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jlmart View Post
    I remember reading an interview with Patrick years ago in which he said he was so excited about moving to Mr Colson because he thought he would start learning the big jumps but Mr Colson made him do nothing but patterns on the ice for a long time. I think the suspicion is that he was doing figures which would explain a lot.
    That's what I've heard, too. Patrick does compulsories(patterns and figures) while training which is why his edges are so deep and fluid.

  16. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by officialcoach View Post
    Back in the day, when a skater passed a figure test, that meant the skater would work to perfect those figures for competition. Now when a skater passes a Moves test they may never work on those Moves again.
    And this, in a nutshell, summarizes the issue. And I wonder whether the elimination of CDs will eventually lead to a deterioration of skills in dance as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Willy View Post
    What has he done to get it to that level? .....Or if they know how it has developed.
    There was an interview a few years ago in which Patrick said that Mr. Colson was always demanding that Patrick get deeper into his knees (there might have even been a video clip of this), and I think that's at the core of his talent - he has incredibly deep, fluid and rhythmic knees that allow him to really pull his edges. Watch his knee action on a counter or rocker and how he sinks back into the edge after the turn.

    Quote Originally Posted by l'etoile View Post
    That's what I've heard, too. Patrick does compulsories(patterns and figures) while training which is why his edges are so deep and fluid.
    Figures could certainly be a contributing factor, but I think his knee action is much more so.
    "I miss footwork that has any kind of a discernible pattern. The goal of a step sequence should not be for a skater to show the same ice coverage as a Zamboni and take about as much time as an ice resurface. " ~ Zemgirl, reflecting on a pre-IJS straight line sequence

  17. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by sap5 View Post
    Sergei had the same technique as Katia, and his blades were not unusually big.

    I think you're right in that this style of skating requires extreme precision, as you are essentially skating on only a very small part of the blade all the time.
    Wow, they must still be using dial-up connections in your town. I guess I should be expecting a reply to this post sometime next year . (I jest ).

    Having re-acquainted myself with the topic, I'll begin with the quibble that I prefaced my remarks with "as a general rule", and "all other factors being equal" . In all seriousness, the example was to illustrate some basic principles of physics as they might apply to skating, so the "male skater" was just a generic cut-out in my mind.

    Nevertheless, as you imply, Sergei was not just any generic male skater, and all factors are not equal, in his particular case. I will roll with you that he may have possessed talents of timing and balance which allowed him to skate much closer to the physical limits of his chosen technique, without crashing over them.

    If you're familiar with golf at all, an example that comes to mind is our newest Masters winner, Bubba Watson. As a passionate golfer, I can tell you that it's a universal truism that there is no way that someone with his swing technique should be able to win at the highest level. But his remarkable natural power, timing and "feel" allow him to overcome the schematic risks of his swing to "create" shots that those with more orthodox technique can't replicate. Doing your own thing is usually frowned upon in the now highly technical world of golf, and so it's quite meaningful and revealing that golf pros and commentators can now only describe Bubba's technical abilities (there is no aesthetically-related scoring in golf), in genuinely admiring tones, as that of "a true artist".

    I would think that maybe Sergei's technique falls into that category.

    But as in the case of Bubba, while Sergei's technique can be a source of wonder, I'm not sure that it is a model that can be successfully replicated by many others.

  18. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by BittyBug View Post
    There was an interview a few years ago in which Patrick said that Mr. Colson was always demanding that Patrick get deeper into his knees (there might have even been a video clip of this), and I think that's at the core of his talent - he has incredibly deep, fluid and rhythmic knees that allow him to really pull his edges. Watch his knee action on a counter or rocker and how he sinks back into the edge after the turn.

    Figures could certainly be a contributing factor, but I think his knee action is much more so.
    Figures I think are a bit more upright and whilst show control, I am not sure contribute to depth of edge.

    The one thing I noticed about Chan (and from video only) is the incredible lean he gets on his crossovers. But it is balanced by his weight keeping to the outside of his circle. So his shoulders are level but underneath that he is leaning to the inside of his circle.

    Also whilst he has great knee bend he cannot do it without ankle flexion. You can tell a skater to bend their knees, but much of the actual control comes from the ankles and keeping them supple.

    I suppose at the end of the day Chan is still a feak.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Willy View Post
    Figures I think are a bit more upright and whilst show control, I am not sure contribute to depth of edge.

    The one thing I noticed about Chan (and from video only) is the incredible lean he gets on his crossovers. But it is balanced by his weight keeping to the outside of his circle. So his shoulders are level but underneath that he is leaning to the inside of his circle.

    Also whilst he has great knee bend he cannot do it without ankle flexion. You can tell a skater to bend their knees, but much of the actual control comes from the ankles and keeping them supple.

    I suppose at the end of the day Chan is still a feak.
    i suppose g/g's early training with zhuk (unconventional as it was like running over rocks) served them really well in the longterm, didnt it?

  20. #100
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    isnt it interesting that in this talk about deep edges, when ice dancers are the supposed standard bearers of such, the discussion gravitates toward gordeeva-grinkov's skating technique instead?

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