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  1. #81
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    That's an age-old problem. Polysyllabic superciliousness does not make one sound smarter.
    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity”– MLK

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    A few years back the word "paradigm" came into vogue and was the buzzword of the moment in management circles. No one used models or examples, everything was a "paradigm". IMO, it was another example of using a relatively obscure word to sound important, when a more common, simple word would have worked as well, if not better.

    Mercifully, paradigm dropped out of vogue shortly thereafter returned to the "word of the day" lists.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reuven View Post
    Polysyllabic superciliousness does not make one sound smarter.


    I'm stealing that and sending it to my daughter to share with her roommates.


    I shall say "I was readin' stuff, saw this, and thought of yous guys"

  4. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reuven View Post
    That's an age-old problem. Polysyllabic superciliousness does not make one sound smarter.
    I would have loved to use that line on my former boss. She was guilty of that all the time. I just grit my teeth and put up with it, though; she wasn't an English major and rarely read anything other than the newspaper, so her exposure to good writing was limited to whatever was forced on her in school twenty years ago.
    My job requires me to be a juggler, but that does not mean that I enjoy working with clowns.

  5. #85
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    One pet peeve of mine is the name of one of Santa's reindeer in The Night Before Christmas. Donner has become more common than Donder.

    But this week I saw a set of embroidered hand towels with the names of Santa's reindeer, including everyone's favorite, Donna.
    "The Devil is joining in, and that's never a good sign." Phil Liggett

  6. #86
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    It's the feminist version.

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    I also have issues with some of the new words being coined in academia.
    For example, 'historicization' and 'problematization'.

    I edit work for a PhD student who insists on using these two words, though I advise him against it.
    They are ugly to read, ugly to enunciate. . .and I do not see why the English language needs them at all. IMO it is much preferable to say 'historical perspective' and 'examine problems'.
    OMG

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlai View Post
    Speaking of profaner, there was an article on the WSJ about the decline of cursing:
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...828507786.html
    Taboo words tend to work their way into common use as they lose their shock value; new taboo words take their place.

    An article on taboo words from 1938 that now seems : http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...848910,00.html

    And a short one on the history of some taboo words (er, the article actually USES many taboo words, so don't read if you are offended by cursing): http://alllie.com/dirtywords.shtml

    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    I also have issues with some of the new words being coined in academia.
    For example, 'historicization' and 'problematization'.
    In writing classes, students are told to "shun the tions!"

    Then some of the students become academics and can't help themselves.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonlady View Post
    Mercifully, paradigm dropped out of vogue shortly thereafter returned to the "word of the day" lists.
    I remember going to a conference in 1992 and a friend of mine saying that if she heard the word "paradigm" one more time, she was going to scream.

    I still hear or see "paradigm" several times a week.
    Trolling dates all the way back to 397 B.C. - People began following Plato around and would make fart noises after everything he said.

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomad View Post
    I hate nouns being turned into adjectives by adding a -y to the end. Or, worse, adding a final -y to a word that already is an adjective.
    Or, adding the suffix "-ness" to an adjective to turn it to a noun ... when a perfectly good noun already exists. Like patheticness instead of pathos, stupidness instead of stupidity, anxiousness instead of anxiety, etc.

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    Or, adding the suffix "-ness" to an adjective to turn it to a noun ... when a perfectly good noun already exists. Like patheticness instead of pathos, stupidness instead of stupidity, anxiousness instead of anxiety, etc.
    I do that when having fun with my coworkers. Another coworker uses the suffix "-osity" in the same manner.

  11. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonlady View Post
    A few years back the word "paradigm" came into vogue and was the buzzword of the moment in management circles. No one used models or examples, everything was a "paradigm".
    The day I saw this headline in the real estate section of the paper circa 1996, was the day the word paradigm became overused to me:

    "House as Paradigm for King Neighborhood"

    How pretentious can you get?

    A phrase I'd like to see retired? "Make no mistake". GAHHH

  12. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    I do that when having fun with my coworkers. Another coworker uses the suffix "-osity" in the same manner.
    I hope that didn't sound like a monstrosity of stuffiness

  13. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    I also have issues with some of the new words being coined in academia.
    For example, 'historicization' and 'problematization'.

    I edit work for a PhD student who insists on using these two words, though I advise him against it.
    They are ugly to read, ugly to enunciate. . .and I do not see why the English language needs them at all. IMO it is much preferable to say 'historical perspective' and 'examine problems'.
    But I don't think that's exactly what those -ization words, or the -ize verbs they derive from, actually mean. You'd have to recast the whole sentence. Which quite likely would improve its readibility. But the reason those verbs and their derivative nouns were coined by academics in the first place was to be able to condense a complex concept into a single word.


    BTW, when I was in grad school I could never remember what "reify" or "reification" meant until I started to semitranslate in my head to "thingify" or "thingification."

  14. #94

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    Right here and now, at this very moment in time as we speak, I am, literally, being taken to the cleaner's. The fact of the matter is, that, after the gentleman in charge of the mens department literally threw I and my husband under the bus, him and me went and bought our glasses elsewhere in another store. These here glasses were a gift to my husband and I. The truth of the matter is, that, as we speak in this here time, right now at present, neither him or I want to ever see that rude, mean, thoughtless gentleman again.

  15. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marlowe View Post
    Right here and now, at this very moment in time as we speak, I am, literally, being taken to the cleaner's. The fact of the matter is, that, after the gentleman in charge of the mens department literally threw I and my husband under the bus, him and me went and bought our glasses elsewhere in another store. These here glasses were a gift to my husband and I. The truth of the matter is, that, as we speak in this here time, right now at present, neither him or I want to ever see that rude, mean, thoughtless gentleman again.
    Welp, that there is terrible. Her and her husband sure got treated real bad. Alls I know is I ain't shopping there no more, neither, centering around these accusations. Anyways, I literally have a ton of housework that won't get done if me and these youngins don't hop to.

  16. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by znachki View Post
    When I pointed out the error, she looked at me and said, "life must be very difficult for you".
    Aww. How completely unsympathetic. I would have completely commiserated with you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    DEFINITELY
    Don't you mean definately?

    Quote Originally Posted by orientalplane View Post
    It's perfectly acceptable to say things such as "I feel more calm" rather than "I feel calmer". It just gives a slightly different nuance to the clause or sentence.
    Or to quote the poets, Metallica: What don't kill you, make you more strong.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    Wonderful titles. I will wear them with pride whenever I go out.
    You should use them as your user title.
    "Cupcakes are bullshit. And everyone knows it. A cupcake is just a muffin with clown puke topping." -Charlie Brooker

  17. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacMadame View Post

    You should use them as your user title.
    So every time I insult Prancer, she gets a new user title?


  18. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrincessLeppard View Post
    So every time I insult Prancer, she gets a new user title?

    It's sort of like It's a Wonderful Life, only not.

    Your plan will only work if you can keep your insults short and sweet; there is a length limit on user titles.
    Trolling dates all the way back to 397 B.C. - People began following Plato around and would make fart noises after everything he said.

  19. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan
    I also have issues with some of the new words being coined in academia.
    For example, 'historicization' and 'problematization'.

    I edit work for a PhD student who insists on using these two words, though I advise him against it.
    They are ugly to read, ugly to enunciate. . .and I do not see why the English language needs them at all. IMO it is much preferable to say 'historical perspective' and 'examine problems'.
    What is funny is those word actually exists and are completly academic in french, "l'historicisation" in social science and "la problématisation" in basic academic reasoning.


    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    In writing classes, students are told to "shun the tions!"
    What do you have against the tions ?
    They are only natural in substantives coming from latin.
    Words are concept. Shun the word, shun the idea.
    Long live to the tions ! Bring them in ! *brandishing my placard*



    Now about the article ...
    "Many people can't write english properly nowadays, boohoo, english is dead" ...



    ...
    Well, how many people could write english properly 100 years ago, or 200 years ago ?
    And how is current english proper compared to Shakespeare's english ?
    It seems to me that the journalist has to "historiciser" his own conception of what the english language is.
    Talking about dying english is actually shocking compared to languages that are really dying around the world which is the true sad thing.
    Language is not only a utility, it is a mind frame and a treasure of humanity. Lost languages are invaluable losses.

    And if written english might be in trouble in the US (is it the same in the UK ?), spoken english is thriving. You're saying it yourself, people are cornering new words.
    Distortion, that's how a language often works and evolves. Like it or not, that shows vitality.
    English is culturally more of an oral language than a written one anyway. That's very visible when I compare to french.

    So actually, I think the article lacks "une problématisation" , ie a definition of what the english language is and a dynamic questioning of the current problem. Rather than a lazy assessment.


    In other words, that's a dull article (that's the tion-proof version for Prancer )


    Taboo words tend to work their way into common use as they lose their shock value; new taboo words take their place.
    The very concept of taboo words is quite strange actually.
    Here we make dictionaries out of them.
    Want some insult dictionary, Little dictionary of insults, dirty words and other profanities, Slang dictionary by the venerable éditions Larousse.
    My parents used to have 4 or 5 of these kinds of books and I own at least 3. They are very popular.
    *spreading the love of the words, the tions, the profanities and the rest of them, be them english, french or every other language *

  20. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nmsis View Post
    What do you have against the tions ?
    They come to us from the French . Damn Normans, screwing up the perfectly plain and functional Anglo-Saxon with Latin.

    But mostly it's because -tion words (as well as other forms) are smothered verbs and using the verb forms whenever possible usually makes for clearer, more direct prose. Rather than trying to get people to shun ideas, the purpose is to force student writers into expressing their ideas more clearly.

    For example, a student might write:

    Additional authorization for the administration of the survey by the staff members has emanated from the director of the department.

    It's grammatically correct, but it's a clunky sentence that would greatly improve with some judicious shunning of the -tions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nmsis View Post
    The very concept of taboo words is quite strange actually.
    Here we make dictionaries out of them.
    Here, too. I would guess most languages have them. Taboo words are just words that aren't used in polite society, not words that aren't used at all.
    Trolling dates all the way back to 397 B.C. - People began following Plato around and would make fart noises after everything he said.

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