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  1. #1
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    Linguistic question

    How do you understand the phrase:

    "They are all experienced translators. They all graduated."

    Does it mean that they have all a university degree or even that they own a Dr.-title?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Capital_B View Post
    How do you understand the phrase:

    "They are all experienced translators. They all graduated."

    Does it mean that they have all a university degree or even that they own a Dr.-title?
    Hard to tell what those two sentences mean without knowing the context in which they originally appeared. Could you elaborate?

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    My interpretation is that they have at least a BA.
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    Unfortunately not. Do you think that a native speaker wrote it?

  5. #5
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    They graduated from translator school?




  6. #6
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    Hm, I thought the same as Nomand, but my dictionary says graduated means having a PhD (Dr.). I am not an American or English native speaker. Are you, Nomad?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norlite View Post
    They graduated from translator school?
    Actually, without any context about who these translators are or what they will be translating or what type of institution they graduated, that is about the limits of what these two sentences would tell you -- that all of theses "experienced translators" had graduated/completed some kind of translation curriculum. There is nothing grammatically wrong with the two sentences, but in and of themselves, they really don't convey a lot of information.

  8. #8
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    I am a native english speaker and with no further context it could mean they graduted from: high school, college, a trade program, an online course. I suppose they could have graduated from a PhD program, but that would probably be the last thing I'd think of.
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Capital_B View Post
    Hm, I thought the same as Nomand, but my dictionary says graduated means having a PhD (Dr.). I am not an American or English native speaker. Are you, Nomad?
    "Graduated" in the United States can merely mean completing your high school (secondary school) education. Or it could mean that one had received a bachelor's degree (4 years of college, usually) or any number of advanced degree programs beyond that. As I said, without more information about the context, it really could mean any number of things.

    ETA: Just saw genevieve's post and I agree with her. Graduated = Ph.D. would be one of the last things I'd think of, although it obviously could mean that.

  10. #10
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    But you don't mention university, Genevieve. Do you exclude this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Capital_B View Post
    But you don't mention university, Genevieve. Do you exclude this?
    I'm not genevieve, but I'm pretty sure she isn't excluding "university." In the United States, most people use the term "college" to mean the same as "university." The distinction is that most "colleges" do not offer advanced degrees, but some do (e.g. Dartmouth College has graduate programs and even a professional program in medicine).

  12. #12
    drinky typo pbp, closet hugger
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    yeah, in general usage here college = university = undergraduate degree
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    Okay, thank you!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Capital_B View Post
    "They are all experienced translators. They all graduated."
    I interpret this as meaning:

    They = Experienced translators
    They = Graduates

    Being experienced translators is unrelated to graduating.
    Being graduates is unrelated to being experienced translators.

    A person can graduate from any kind of program if they enroll and complete the curriculum, including requirements for conduct and payment.

    A person can be an experienced translator if they convert meaning in one language to analogous meaning in another language.
    Last edited by bardtoob; 08-21-2010 at 02:08 AM.

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    I interpret it to mean they have at least a 4 year college degree. They may or may not have more than that.
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Capital_B View Post
    How do you understand the phrase:

    "They are all experienced translators. They all graduated."

    Does it mean that they have all a university degree or even that they own a Dr.-title?
    Here is my guess….

    If the person who wrote these lines is not an native English speaker, AND if he/she does not come from a romance-language base, then he/she is saying: They all have diplomas/They all are certified (to be qualified translators).

    In some European non-romance languages if you try to translate “certified” as in “has a professional diploma” into English, you get “graduated”. That is true in Russian, Dutch, few Scandinavian dialects…. When you want to say “diplomed/certified” you get “graduated” in the dictionary.

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    Tinami Amori is on to something. For native English speakers, "certified" or "credentialed" is used more often. That indicates that someone has specialized training and is recognized as qualified by some sort of governing body.

    For example, someone who is fluent in Spanish and English may attend medical translator courses then sit for an exam. If s/he passes, s/he can use the designation CMI, Certified Medical Interpreter. Similarly, legal interpreters must be certified by the court system in which they practice.
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  18. #18

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    I took it to mean that so few people graduate with a translation degree that when they do, they're automatically considered experienced.

    Taking each sentence separately, they all have experience, and they all have a degree.
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  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by *Jen* View Post
    Taking each sentence separately, they all have experience, and they all have a degree.
    Taking both sentences separately doesn't mean they all have a degree. If you're taking the sentences by themselves, "They all graduated." doesn't mean much at all, which is why the OP asked the question. There's nothing to say what they graduated with - it could be a high school diploma, a graduate or undergraduate degree, or a translation certification. It could be anything.

    I would take the sentences together to mean they (the experienced translators) would have graduated university with at least an undergraduate degree, but only because I think it would be difficult/rare for a high school graduate to become experienced at translating at a high/semi-professional level needed for a job in the field.

    To me, the sentences look like they could come from a website of an organisation that provide semi-professional translators. I say semi-professional because I think professional translators would have formal qualifications, affiliations or certifications that would be listed in a format the reader would understand easily. I don't think I'd want the person who wrote this to do any important translating for me.

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