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  1. #1
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    Canadians are sensitive

    U.K. tourism guide warns Canadians are sensitive

    Are Canadians easily offended? British tourism officials seem to think so.

    New tourism guidelines for the 2012 London Olympics warn that Canadians can be overly sensitive, especially about their national identity.

    Seeking to improve the sometimes frosty welcome on offer to tourists, VisitBritain has issued advice on how best to handle foreign visitors.

    The advice says Canadian tourists are likely to be upset if mistaken for U.S. citizens.
    Here's another article:

    British tourism guide warns Canadians sensitive about national identity

  2. #2

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    As a first generation American of a Canadian father, yes, it's true. Any why wouldn't they be? True, their GDP isn't on the level of the US, but they do have their sh!t together.
    AceOn6, the golf loving skating fan

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    Creating drama!

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    I am hurt. ; I am going to take my knitting needles and go and hide.

    Seriously? I think some are more annoyed than sensitive. (shrug)

  5. #5
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    Are Australians as offended when mistaken for British? Scots for Irish? (Never mind that last, that's a whopping great "yes".)

  6. #6
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    The advice says Canadian tourists are likely to be upset if mistaken for U.S. citizens.
    Very true.

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    Hey, I take offense to that stereotype.................

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norlite View Post
    Very true.
    Proof that they can't take a joke?

    NJL

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    Off topic, but from the same article:

    Chinese visitors may be unimpressed by landmarks just a few hundred years old, tourism staff are told.


    And it's so true! My mom was Chinese and she was never ever impressed by any "historical" landmarks in the US.

  10. #10
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    A typical question I've been asked on visit to the UK is "what part of America are you from?"

    My response tends to be "I'm from the Canadian part of North America".

    I don't consider it sensitivity as much as pride - I am Canadian
    Can't skate but love to watch

  11. #11
    Watch me move
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    [[sob]] My feelings are hurt. {[sniff]]

    What I really laughed at in this story, though, was this part:
    Indians are in general, an impatient lot, and like to be quickly attended to," the guidelines claim. "The more affluent they are, the more demanding and brusque they tend to be."
    Gee, I wonder which colonializing empire the Indian culture learned this from
    Who wants to watch rich people eat pizza? They must have loved that in Bangladesh. - Randy Newman on the 2014 Oscars broadcast

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    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    Are Australians as offended when mistaken for British? Scots for Irish? (Never mind that last, that's a whopping great "yes".)
    I'd say yes, because the accents are so vastly different, although I wouldn't be. Now Australians and New Zealanders, that's a little more serious. I'm not offended to be mistaken for a kiwi, but people in London tell me they've had their heads bitten off for being called Australian
    One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.

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    The advice says Canadian tourists are likely to be upset if mistaken for U.S. citizens.
    Who wouldn't be offended if someone thought they were from the U.S.???



    Seriously though, when I was travelling throughout Europe in the 90's, I heard stories of how people from the U.S. would have sewn a Canadian flag on their backpacks because they got treated better if Europeans thought they were Canadian instead of American.
    It's official. I am madly in love with Meryl Davis.

  14. #14

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    This story goes further than advice about Canada http://www.smh.com.au/travel/travel-...812-1202c.html
    One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron W View Post
    Canadians are sensitive
    Yup.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    Who wouldn't be offended if someone thought they were from the U.S.???



    Seriously though, when I was travelling throughout Europe in the 90's, I heard stories of how people from the U.S. would have sewn a Canadian flag on their backpacks because they got treated better if Europeans thought they were Canadian instead of American.
    I'm really sad that I missed my chance to get a Canadian passport when I reached majority. It didn't seem all that important at the time, but I'd really enjoy traveling under the Maple Leaf.
    AceOn6, the golf loving skating fan

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    So yeah, just for kicks:
    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    Are Australians as offended when mistaken for British? Scots for Irish? (Never mind that last, that's a whopping great "yes".)
    Danny Bhoy does Irish
    Quote Originally Posted by *Jen* View Post
    I'd say yes, because the accents are so vastly different, although I wouldn't be. Now Australians and New Zealanders, that's a little more serious. I'm not offended to be mistaken for a kiwi, but people in London tell me they've had their heads bitten off for being called Australian
    Kiwis vs. Aussies

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    Seriously though, when I was travelling throughout Europe in the 90's, I heard stories of how people from the U.S. would have sewn a Canadian flag on their backpacks because they got treated better if Europeans thought they were Canadian instead of American.
    When my son was traveling in Europe a few years ago, there were so many Americans trying to pass as Canadians that he once had to prove he was a real Canadian by answering trivia questions about hockey.

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    I don't think it's necessarily true that Canadian tourists are offended if they are mistaken for US citizens. The US is the more well-known country and people might easily jump to the conclusion that an English speaker without an Aussie or British accent was an American.

    Just as a Canadian or American might mistakenly identify a Welsh, Scottish or Irish person as British.

  20. #20
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    What's the big deal about being mistaken for being from a different country?

    When I've been overseas, I've been mistaken for a German, a Norwegian, a Dutchman, a Swede, an Englishman, a Welshman, an Argentinean, a Frenchman, and who knows what else?

    In my own country, the U.S., I've been mistaken for British or German and been asked many times what country I am from. (For the record, I was born and grew up in California.)

    Canadians must be unsure of what it means to be Canadian if they are so sensitive about being mistaken for Americans.

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