Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 65
  1. #41
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    10,234
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    You're right. Kiri Baga won 09 Nationals as a novice with 4 triples. Katarina Kulgeyko (Intermediate Champ. 09) did 2. Lauren Dinh (Intermediate Bronze 09) actually did 3. This year was a bit different though. Leah Keiser had 5 triples, including a lutz! She really could have been junior...she would have medalled.
    Well the reigning world bronze medalist did 3 types of triples (toe, loop, lutz) in her SP and FS combined at Worlds, and only completed 2 types of triples (toe, lutz) and 3 triples total in her FS. The 09 US Champion only did 3 types of triples (loop, flip, lutz) in her SP and FS combined at nationals and only completed 3 triples in that FS. This year's GPF winner won the title with a 4 triple FS....maybe you guys are on to something?

  2. #42
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    7,138
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by bardtoob View Post
    Novice, Jr, Sr?

    Furthermore, it still makes no sense to discuss a skater that intended to competed for another country in a thread that was intended to imply US Nationals. It's absurd.
    No, actually it isn't, considering that De Leeuw actually did try to reach US nationals, but never made it out of regionals. I don't appreciate the unnecessary, and frankly, pointless sarcasm.

    Chan and Suguri never attempted to reach US Nationals. Diane De Leeuw did. She didn't. Therefore, she is a great skater that didn't qualify for US Nationals. Period. End of story. Nothing to debate here.

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Some place competitive and athletic, but ultimately more like an audition than anything else.
    Posts
    7,800
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    19516
    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    No, actually it isn't, considering that De Leeuw actually did try to reach US nationals, but never made it out of regionals. I don't appreciate the unnecessary, and frankly, pointless sarcasm.

    Chan and Suguri never attempted to reach US Nationals. Diane De Leeuw did. She didn't. Therefore, she is a great skater that didn't qualify for US Nationals. Period. End of story. Nothing to debate here.
    Apparently, the sarcasm made it's point and there is plenty to debate that you did not address in your laziness
    Last edited by bardtoob; 08-12-2010 at 03:32 PM.

  4. #44
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    7,138
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    What is there to debate about? It's hard to debate facts.

    Thanks for the bad rep, by the way.

  5. #45

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Some place competitive and athletic, but ultimately more like an audition than anything else.
    Posts
    7,800
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    19516
    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    What is there to debate about? It's hard to debate facts.

    Thanks for the bad rep, by the way.
    I thought you might like that since you certainly deserve it. It is hard to debate facts

    Dianne de Leeuw was born in California to a Dutch mother and a father with dual US/Dutch nationality. When she was an up and coming figure skater, her grandfather expressed the wish that she would compete for the Netherlands, rather than the US. She first competed for the Dutch title in 1971, and won it right away, claiming the title until 1976. She developed into a world class figure skater, winning her first international medals in 1974. In 1975, she defeated semi-compatriot Dorothy Hamill for the world title, which did no sit well with the American press. In 1976, she also won the European Championships (following two silver medals), and the Dutch media expected her to become the successor to Sjoukje Dijkstra. However, she lost to Hamill and placed second. She ended her competitive figure skating career later that season and joined an ice show, touring North America. At present, she is a figure skating teacher together with her husband and former coach, Doug Chapman.
    Sport Reference- Olympic Sports: Dianne Margaret de Leeuw

    How Dianne Began Skating:
    Dianne's mother, being from Holland, always ice skated. She went with her mother to a skating "Coffee Club" class when she was a little girl and immediately took to ice skating.

    After that, she became more serious about figure skating and her family decided to take advantage of her dual citzenship by skating for the Netherlands. It was decided that international competition experience was the best route for Dianne . . .

    Dianne's Olympic Experience:
    Dianne took part in two Olympics. She writes: "1972 was all fun, seeing the sights and events in Japan (I placed 15th). 1976 was all business. My only great memories were carrying the Dutch flag at the Opening Ceremonies and an outdoor practice before the games started. That practice was at the speed skating oval filled in with ice. On the first night of practice, there were only a few skaters and the ice was not sectioned off, so there was ice as far as you could see under the stars. I didn't want to get off!"
    1975 World Champion and 1976 Olympic Silver Medalist Dianne DeLeeuw By Jo Ann Schneider Farris
    Last edited by bardtoob; 08-12-2010 at 04:29 PM.

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Age
    53
    Posts
    10,472
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    21476
    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    Chan and Suguri never attempted to reach US Nationals. Diane De Leeuw did. She didn't. Therefore, she is a great skater that didn't qualify for US Nationals. Period. End of story. Nothing to debate here.
    Maybe the question should be phrased as "great skaters who consistently failed to qualify for US Nationals," thus excluding all skaters, especially those from other countries, who didn't try.

    Of course that would also leave out someone like Katherine Healy who turned pro before she was ready to try. Or did she get to novice regionals once before going pro?


    There would also need to be a definition of what makes someone a great skater. Criteria results? Jumps? Speed and edges? Artistry?

    Even if we agree on what criteria to use, I'm sure there would still be plenty of disagreement on which skaters actually meet them.

  7. #47
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    19
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by neptune View Post
    I was just thinking--is there going to be another thread, "Terrible Skaters Who Never Qualified for Nationals"? I wonder if there were very many of those?
    I can think of one: ME!!!

    lol I was never even near that level. In fact I was so "terrible" that I could never test for my Novice Free because I could not string a double toe or double loop onto another double jump if my life depended on it.

    Actually I'm pretty pround of the fact that I could do double jumps. I had everythng up to a double flutz =)

  8. #48
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    7,138
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Sylvia View Post
    \

    I remember when Kayla Howey's name came up last season as someone who had consistently "come close" to qualifying for U.S. Nationals as a novice and junior but hadn't due to the depth/competitiveness of her regional and sectional. Well, she finally made it to Nationals as a Senior in 2010!
    Yes, finally! Unfortunately, she had with draw before the long though.

  9. #49
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    'Me so ashamed of my English'
    Age
    31
    Posts
    18,018
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    This thread title is such a paradox I had to post.

    "Great" yet FAILED to qualify for NATIONALS.

  10. #50

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Some place competitive and athletic, but ultimately more like an audition than anything else.
    Posts
    7,800
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    19516
    Janet Champion - Child Skating Star

    When she was eight years old she won the Grand Prize at the California State Exchange Club Talent Contest. The prize included a trophy and a small cash prize. Accepting the money automatically made her a professional in figure skating because at that time, a skater couldn't accept money for anything even if it wasn't skating.
    After she won the California State Exchange Club Contest, the only skating rink in San Diego closed, so she began skating in Los Angeles. Her coach arranged for her to be seen by the owners of Ice Follies and she impressed them with more than ten back handsprings on the ice.
    Janet Champion - - Child Skating Star and Skating Coach
    Last edited by bardtoob; 08-18-2010 at 03:12 AM.

  11. #51

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Some place competitive and athletic, but ultimately more like an audition than anything else.
    Posts
    7,800
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    19516

  12. #52
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,520
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Mabel Fairbanks

    When she ventured to the local ice rink, she was denied entry. She continued to hone her skills while returning to the rink repeatedly. Her persistence paid off: the manager finally relented and the rest, as we say, is black history.

    She developed into a formidable figure skater but she was barred from joining any figure skating clubs, which was the route to official competition.

    *snip*

    Despite her skills and talent, she was never allowed to take part in official competition.

  13. #53
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    7,138
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by poths View Post
    This thread title is such a paradox I had to post.

    "Great" yet FAILED to qualify for NATIONALS.
    Some people just do not seem to get it, unfortunately.

    Yes, in my opinion, and in the the opinions of several others who have posted here, there are "great" skates that have had poor competitions and have never qualified for nationals. Diane DeLeeuw is one of these people, yet she represented the Netherlands and won Olympic Gold, much to the dismay of US Figure Skating.

    It's fine to disagree with me, but don't come here and mock me and others who agree. That's just being a rude little b*tch.

  14. #54

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Staring at the ocean, anywhere anytime
    Posts
    9,866
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11372
    Did Joanna Ng ever make it to senior nationals?

    http://www.joannang.com/

    http://www.joannang.com/exp.html

    Unfortunately, there isn't a bio entry really on Joanna Ng's website.

    Joanna was very young, 12, and won a Skate Canada competition for Interpretative skating against adults, which did not allow triple jumps. Here:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlDBuOkNfvo

    She might have been US novice champion at the time? And she went on to skate in juniors the next year or two.

    I was looking forward to seeing her compete, but she went professional almost immediately, and is still a 'skating professional'.

  15. #55

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Age
    53
    Posts
    10,472
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    21476
    Quote Originally Posted by DORISPULASKI View Post
    Did Joanna Ng ever make it to senior nationals?
    Yes, in 1995.

  16. #56
    Loving on babies!
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Twin heaven!
    Posts
    11,727
    vCash
    1570
    Rep Power
    42922
    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    Some people just do not seem to get it, unfortunately.

    Yes, in my opinion, and in the the opinions of several others who have posted here, there are "great" skates that have had poor competitions and have never qualified for nationals.
    And some of it is hard to "get". I think for many people, being a "great" skater encompasses being a great competitor, or at least a competent and somewhat consistent one. Someone who is so weak of a competitor, regardless of their quality as a skater, that they are completely unable to qualify for nationals, it's hard to think of them as a "great" skater. Not much to "get" there.
    I am free of all prejudices. I hate everyone equally.~W. C. Fields

  17. #57
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    7,138
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Oh, really? So a skater who places 4th in the short program at sectionals, 5th in the free skate and 5th overall by a few tenths of a point can't be considered great? I'm sorry, but I beg to differ. Agnes Zawadzki didn't make it to nationals in 2009. The USFSA thought with your mentality and didn't put her on the JGP last fall. She went on to win Silver at the World Junior Championships, defeating Polina Shelepen and Christina Gao, silver and bronze medalists at the 2009-10 Junior Grand Prix Final. Enough said. Just because a skater doesn't make it to nationals doesn't define their entire career.

  18. #58
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Age
    23
    Posts
    13,268
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    And if Agnes Zawadzki were to never qualify for a Nationals she would not be considered a great skater. In fact by most peoples standards she is not a great skater at this point either, though she could become one in the future.

  19. #59
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    7,138
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Obviously, we have to agree to disagree. This debate could rage on for months, but that's not in the cards for me.

  20. #60

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Some place competitive and athletic, but ultimately more like an audition than anything else.
    Posts
    7,800
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    19516
    IMHO, I think that the only "great skaters to never qualify for US Nationals" are probably from the true amatuer figures era that could not do figures very well, could not get into a skating club for whatever reason (such SES discrimination), could not afford training (ice time, costumes, etc.), or accepted money for any reason (since earning money for anything, even singing, made a skater a professional).

    In the current era, skaters can earn money to free skate in competition or shows, and accept endorsement deals, so there is not excuse except ones own inconsistency.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •