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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiruwater View Post
    Winslet's win for The Reader definitely felt like one of those "well, she deserves to get it at some point" wins
    The Reader gets overlooked sometimes because it bears all the cliche hallmarks of Oscar bait - Holocaust-related, accents, fug-her-up makeup, etc. But it really is an excellent movie and Winslet's performance in it is top-rate. I haven't seen Iris, but I think her performance in The Reader tops the others she was nominated for (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Titanic (maybe), Sense & Sensibility). It's not so much about the Holocaust, rather that's just a backdrop to the examination of personal shame and pride.

    Leonardo diCaprio and Ralph Fiennes are criminally lacking Oscars. Don't even get me started on Fiennes not getting a nomination for The Constant Gardener.

    And now back to your regularly scheduled programming

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    So, am I the only one who couldn't understand anything coming out of some of these characters' mouths? Heavy accents, gun shots, and bombs make manhn feel really old. I'm pretty sure that's why the movie was more confusing than it was. You couldn't decipher the exposition.

    That said, I was riveted. Leo is so good.

    I refuse to watch Revolutionary Road. I loathed American Beauty. Let me guess---suburbia sucks and everyone dies?
    Last edited by manhn; 07-28-2010 at 07:50 AM.

  3. #63

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    I just heard about this (and listened to the YouTube video this morning) and had to share: The Secret of the "Inception" Soundtrack.
    "Liking this sport is ridiculous, so you’re a little different for liking it, she explained. But you’re allowed to like what you like." - Robert Samuels

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by manhn View Post
    So, am I the only one who couldn't understand anything coming out of some of these characters' mouths? Heavy accents, gun shots, and bombs make manhn feel really old. I'm pretty sure that's why the movie was more confusing than it was. You couldn't decipher the exposition.
    Watanabe was a little difficult to understand, but I only completely missed one line of his dialogue the first time I saw it. It helped that the characters would basically confirm his questions/lines back.

    Quote Originally Posted by CynicElle View Post
    I just heard about this (and listened to the YouTube video this morning) and had to share: The Secret of the "Inception" Soundtrack.
    Dude, that just came up on Boing Boing yesterday. Inception is EVERYWHERE!

    I have to note how this changes my perspective on the opening company credits. Before we see any images at the start of the movie, the black screen pulsates with those same beating horns.

    Nolan is telling us we're in a multiple-level dream, and to wait for a kick.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    And anyone who wants a crazy/awesome deep analysis of what Inception might actually mean, there's this article I just read:

    http://chud.com/articles/articles/24...ION/Page1.html
    Brilliant analysis!

    This actually elevated the film quite a bit for me. I think most people, myself included, were too fixated on the last scene and that stupid top.

    Is Leo in reality or dreamworld? That's the question (we think) we're left to ponder, and in that sense, it's very anti-climatic or even contrived, but in actuality the entire film is saying that question of what "is/isn't" is completely irrelevant. The top doesn't matter at all.

    Interpreted on that level, it's actually quite an interesting meta statement, especially considering it's ultimately an action thriller film--not exactly the typical vehicle through which cinema normally explores these kinds of ideas in depth.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBZ View Post
    Brilliant analysis!

    This actually elevated the film quite a bit for me. I think most people, myself included, were too fixated on the last scene and that stupid top.

    Is Leo in reality or dreamworld? That's the question (we think) we're left to ponder, and in that sense, it's very anti-climatic or even contrived, but in actuality the entire film is saying that question of what "is/isn't" is completely irrelevant. The top doesn't matter at all.

    Interpreted on that level, it's actually quite an interesting meta statement, especially considering it's ultimately an action thriller film--not exactly the typical vehicle through which cinema normally explores these kinds of ideas in depth.
    I think so too, while the dream/reality argument doesn't wholly interest me anymore. It's interesting to see which scenes are kept intentionally ambiguous in that respect though, and to study why they're that way.

    If you liked that article, this one is pretty neat as well, analyzing Cobb's emotional story:

    http://www.ravenfoundation.org/blogs...iews/inception

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    I think so too, while the dream/reality argument doesn't wholly interest me anymore. [/url]
    I feel the same way. Ultimately the film is about Cobb dealing with his wife's leaving him. Whether that happens in a (very convoluted) dream or reality, whether she's actually dead or just left him because of something he did, it really doesn't matter! (Although I have to say that I love the theory of the whole thing being a dream and each of the characters, especially Ariadne, being an aspect of Cobb's subconscious.)

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by manhn View Post
    So, am I the only one who couldn't understand anything coming out of some of these characters' mouths? Heavy accents, gun shots, and bombs make manhn feel really old. I'm pretty sure that's why the movie was more confusing than it was. You couldn't decipher the exposition.
    I often have trouble hearing dialogue but didn't find this too bad, I could even make out most of what Watanabe said.

    You could always watch it on DVD and turn the English subtitles on.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by cailuj365 View Post
    No, I know. That was my first perception at first too, that we just didn't know how much time had passed since the last time he saw his children and that they could still be very young. However, James is the younger one and he looks no older than 5 during his scenes. The voice on the phone was a boy that was clearly older than 5, much more like a 10-year-old. Then, the voice changed back to a 5-year-old...
    Yeah! I was wondering about that too. That whole part confused me with the phone thing.

    Loved this movie...still trying to process it all. I saw it last week while in Michigan. Best movie of the summer for me, and possibly the year.

    And good catch on the wedding ring detail, Anita. I'll have to look for that on the dvd.

    And this article http://chud.com/articles/articles/24...ION/Page1.html that was posted, mentions a lot of things that I noticed, but I was willing to give over to "suspension of belief" because I was watching a movie. But yeah, the whole part where he's running from the goons and gets squeezed between two buildings...his wife across an alleyway when she's about to jump, etc...all lend themselves to the idea that even the real "world" was a dream. Who knows...all I know is it was a great movie. Makes me think...which is why I loved Lost. hehe
    Last edited by Satellitegirl; 08-16-2010 at 02:13 PM.

  10. #70
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    The script has been released and it made me realize something that should have been very obvious but couldn't put words to until now. The conversation between Cobb and Saito in limbo at the end gets me caught up emotionally, and it's because it's Cobb's redemption for Mal's death. He gets another chance to convince someone to kill themselves to escape limbo. In Cobb's dream levels, he recreates his memories so maybe he can change something. In Saito's limbo, he gets to do so for real.

    But instead of performing inception on Saito and messing with his mind, he collaborates with him and they work together. Saito spins the top. Cobb tells him what he needs to know, asking him to "come back" and Saito is the one who actually pulls the trigger to get them out.

    This is also another major change in Cobb, when he finally lets go of his need for control. You notice how he's always getting to do the pitch, be the guy who turns the mark or takes the stuff. Cobb even asks Ariadne if the strongroom has any windows so he can watch what Fischer does in it, and Ariadne replies that it wouldn't be very strong if it did. But on this job, he "takes a leap of faith" since Eames is the only one who witnesses Fischer complete the inception. And obviously he offers Saito the reminder that limbo is not real, asks him to come back, and Saito makes up his own mind.


    My screenwriting friend also saw Inception last week and, not having figured it out for myself yet, I asked her what she thought the top represented. She suggested that it was analogous to the spinning of a story. The whole point of playing with a top is to see how long it spins before falling over, right? Otherwise it's not much fun. It just lays there.

    It's the same with a story. When you're in the middle of one, you like the ride, you like seeing what comes next. When it's over, it's not much fun anymore.

    By leaving the top still spinning during the last scene, Nolan offers the audience the chance to keep the top spinning in their minds, even though the story is over. That's why the top spins forever in dreams - there's nothing stopping our subconscious from creating stories upon stories if so wished. Even though the stories aren't real.

    I think that's also why the image of the top spinning in limbo when Cobb says, "This world is not real" gets me emotionally as well. Not only does it act like a totem to remind Cobb that it's a dream, but it's a reminder to the audience that "this world" (ie, the world of the movie) isn't real, it's just a story and it'll have to end.


    I extended the top metaphor by also designating the top as a physical reminder of Cobb's guilt. The top tells him when he's dreaming, right? To Cobb, this is especially important because he can't control his projection of Mal when he's dreaming. She represents the guilt that is always there, spinning in his mind. The top is always reminding him of that, and the fact that it was her totem drives this deeper. When Cobb dreams, he only dreams of the situations he wishes he could change. When he dreams, when he's in a world where that top spins forever, he dreams of guilt.

    When he finally faces Mal and acknowledges that she's not real, he's also able to face the top as it spins between him and Saito in limbo, telling him that this world, a world where guilt permeates his very being, isn't real. The guilt is not real. It's only real in his mind, and he can let it spin could-haves, would-haves, should-haves for the rest of his life. Or he can choose to walk away from it, which he finally does at the end of the film.

    See, these kinds of theories are also keeping the movie alive (and spinning) in our heads. It's really a lot of fun.

    So yeah, those were my coolest "aha!" revelations for this week.

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