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  1. #41
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    A long-winded gossip-fest on a disgusting old roommate: Cory Doctorow

    My analysis of the 2010 Olympics Men's LP, with numbers and everything: David Foster Wallace

    A very stark dystopian short story: James Joyce

    A short story about creating clones in a laboratory only to have them kill each other: James Joyce

    An X-Files imitation I wrote in high school: Stephen King (well, gotta hand it to the computer on that one I guess)

    HAH. A personals ad I wrote: H. P. Lovecraft

  2. #42
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    I used one of my figure skating reports and I write like...J. D. Salinger.

    This is my last post. Now leave me alone!

    Quote Originally Posted by LordCirque View Post
    I always considered my work more like JD Salinger.
    Wannabe.
    It's official. I am madly in love with Meryl Davis.

  3. #43

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    Well, I submitted three excerpts from a recent piece of non-fiction I wrote and got, successivley: James Joyce, Isaac Asimov, and Mario Puzo. I am about what is the commonality of their writing styles.

    I decided to "test" the tool a couple of times, so I entered text from a grievance I had written up for a union case and got Arthur C. Clarke.

    For a final test I submitted two passages from Pride & Prejudice -- they both yielded "Jane Austen" so I suppose that there is at least some minimal validity in what it purports to measure. If it had come up with "Robert James Waller" instead, that would have been proof positive that it was total crap!

  4. #44
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    I wrote "Once Upon a time there was a fairy godmother" and got told I write like Kurt Vonnegut

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I don't think it's a joke, exactly, but I would guess it works by calculating the Gunning Fog Index or (more likely) the Flesch-Kincaid Readability formula to find a range of authors, and then matches specific authors in that range by matching word use.

    I don't know that for sure, but that would be my guess.
    Guess again.

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...DTL&type=books

    The New York Times tried putting in actual novels, such as "Moby-Dick." Herman Melville, it turns out, writes less like himself than King, according to I Write Like.

    Obviously, I Write Like isn't an exact science. But simply the idea of an algorithm that can reveal traces of influence in writing has proven wildly popular.

    Though the site might seem the idle dalliance of an English professor on summer break, it was created by Dmitry Chestnykh, a 27-year-old Russian software programmer currently living in Montenegro. Though he speaks English reasonably well, it's his second language.

    Chestnykh modeled the site on software for e-mail spam filters. This means that the site's text analysis is largely keyword based. Even if you write in short, declarative, Hemingwayesque sentences, its your word choice that may determine your comparison.

    Chestnykh has uploaded works by about 50 authors - three books for each, he said. That, too, explains some of its shortcomings. Melville, for example, isn't in the system.

  6. #46
    Bountifully Enmeshed
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squibble View Post
    Guess again.
    Geez, that's even less likely to produce a good match.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

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