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  1. #21
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    When I see a dog free roaming a neighborhood, I always have half a mind to take him in and bring him to a shelter in case he's been abandoned. That's how our dog was found - a police officer found him wandering in the street without a collar.

    That's another danger of letting your dog roam without supervision! Good Samaritans!

  2. #22

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    I cannot stand people who do not leash their dogs. We don't have a leash law where I live, and my (leashed) miniature Schnauzer was attacked by an unleashed German Shepard. He had a large bit on his back and the dog leaped and bit him again when my dad scooped Toby up. It's completely irresponsible and a danger to the dog, other dogs and people.

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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOIJTO View Post
    Both owners will have fines. I would guess the boxer will be ordered to be destroyed.
    Not necessarily. The dog off leash might get a fine, but not the dog that attacked it. My dog was attacked. Which I posted about when it happened. My dog was on a leash, the other dog was on a leash. That owner was not fined. However, their homeowners paid for my dog's vet bills, which resulted from the attack.

    To refresh, I was walking my Cavalier Spaniel on a short leash, in the street. My neighbors had taken a 7 year old yellow lab from friends (who could not keep it) the day before. The family was out walking their new dog - Mom, Dad, 11 yr old girl, 8 yr old girl, & 3 yr old girl. The 8 yr old had the leash. the 8 yr old weighs about 60 lbs, the lab weighs over 100 & it's a strange dog. We were walking in opposite directions and as we passed we stopped, the kids wanted me to see their new dog. The lab shot like a rocket at my dog, the 8 yr old could not hold onto the leash. My dog had been pulling to get near the kids. I realized in a half second that this lab was attacking but it was so fast I could not pull my dog away fast enough. It got my dog by the throat and shook it trying to kill it. It is a horrible thing to see. You don't know what to do. Trying to pull my dog away could have made the injury worse. Hitting or kicking the lab could have made it more angry and it could have been worse. The father was bale to pry it's mouth open and my dog fell away. The lab tried to get back at my dog, but I had picked him up and was shielding him as they dragged the lab away. My dog had to be put under, had to have his shoulder cleaned out, and had 6 drains put in with stitches for each. He now has a lump there which bothers him. but thankfully, he survived. He is terrified of big dogs now and startles when something moves toward him quickly. We had to notify the police, who notified animal control. The neighbors gave the dog back to their friends (?), who later told them that the dog had attacked other dogs before. Why they didn't tell them up front when the family had 3 young kids is beyond me. My neighbors were also traumatized by the attack, it was awful for them. They did pay for everything for my dog's treatment. And they got a new puppy, a Cockapoo.

    As bad as it was, it could have been so much worse. Their 8 yr old could have been dragged or hit by a car. That is the one irresponsible thing they did. Giving the leash to a 60 lb child was not a good idea. But, both dogs were on leashes and it happened anyway. I now know what to do if my dog is attacked. But, hopefully I will never have to deal with that again. It still gives me nightmares.

  4. #24

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    If both dogs were unleashed, both owners are responsible. But if the owner of the poodle were not even present, I'd put more of the onus on that person.

    I've had a few situations in which my dog has gotten into a fight with another. In the first case my older dog was protecting a puppy and in the second got into a scrap with a little dog on the little dog's property. In both cases, I paid the vet bill.

    My golden retriever has had some aggression issues and one important lesson I've learned in to never approach another dog with the leash taut - a taut leash may give the dog the message that there is danger.

    And I've found that little dogs can be trouble because their owners often assume that little = non-aggressive.

    My dog got into a scrap with a little dog once and I intervened, trying to pull my dog away, while the little dog's owner went passive and did nothing, although she could have easily pulled her dog away.

    Dogs do get into , just like people, so you need to be careful if you have a dog with any aggression issues, large or small. If your dog has any such issues, large or small, it should never be allowed off-leash anywhere but your own private property or in an off-leash park.

    If your dog just get into a scrap involving teeth, you can intervene by pulling on its tail or lifting up its hind legs.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    I
    My golden retriever has had some aggression issues and one important lesson I've learned in to never approach another dog with the leash taut - a taut leash may give the dog the message that there is danger.
    I think that can be situational. In our neighborhood, all of the dogs know each other. We all walk around the block and our dogs see each other and wag their tails and run to each other. They are all fine and play. Most of my neighbors use those leashes that play out and rewind with a button. I use a traditional strap leash. I don't like my dog getting too far away from me, I worry about cars. But, my dog's leash is taught when he wants to get to a doggie friend faster than I can walk.

    And I've found that little dogs can be trouble because their owners often assume that little = non-aggressive.
    Yes, we have a neighbor who has a Cockapoo who is very nasty, and a neighbor who has a Bishon who is nasty to every dog but mine (have no clue why she likes mine, except he was so young when he met her, we think she was mothering him). But the owners know their dogs don't like other dogs and tell people. I think, though that owners of small dogs just figure that they can't do much damage - wrong!

    Dogs do get into , just like people, so you need to be careful if you have a dog with any aggression issues, large or small. If your dog has any such issues, large or small, it should never be allowed off-leash anywhere but your own private property or in an off-leash park.
    My dog is one of the most non aggressive dogs there is. But, I don't take him anywhere off leash. I just don't trust other people and their dogs.

    If your dog just get into a scrap involving teeth, you can intervene by pulling on its tail or lifting up its hind legs.
    And if that doesn't work grab a stick and shove it down the throat of the biting dog. I know that sounds awful, but if it's trying to kill your dog...

    Just an FYI, my dog did not get into a scrap. This dog tried to kill him.

  6. #26

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    What's the law concerning muzzles over in the USA? Is there one? Are they common?

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ozzisk8tr View Post
    What's the law concerning muzzles over in the USA? Is there one? Are they common?
    I'm not a dog owner but IME muzzles are rare - the only time I hear of them are when a dog has been determined to be aggressive and the owner is required to use one. Can't remember the last time I saw one on a dog.
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  8. #28
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    I don't know that I've ever seen one. I think part of the problem is enforcing a muzzle law. The only time when it becomes an issue is when the dog attacks someone or some animal, and then it's too late.

    I do know that in the area I live in it's 1 strike on a person and 3 strikes on another domestic animal. But again, it has to be reported to be enforced. when this dog attacked mine, animal control followed up in the town it was sent back to. I don't know what happened from there.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    And I've found that little dogs can be trouble because their owners often assume that little = non-aggressive.
    I know someone who has a chiuaha who has the biggest complex I have ever seen on a dog. Absolutely nasty little piece of sh*t.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bev Johnston View Post
    I hate it when unleashed dogs run up to us, because my dog takes the running toward us as a sign of aggression.
    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    My golden retriever has had some aggression issues and one important lesson I've learned in to never approach another dog with the leash taut - a taut leash may give the dog the message that there is danger.

    And I've found that little dogs can be trouble because their owners often assume that little = non-aggressive.
    This - I regularly look after and walk my son's dog while he is at work (she's a 20-month-old boisterous Rottweiler). She is always leashed with both a head collar and body harness and I have been to obedience lessons with her. But, she is a breed with a chase (and herding) instinct and I am just heartily sick to death of walking her through my local park and being endlessly approached by unleashed small dogs who run up to us yapping, dancing around, snarling, sniffing, etc., sometimes in groups if the owner is 'walking' a few dogs at once. There are also some very large dogs unleashed regardless of whether there are children around. She of course then tries to run with them or becomes agitated if they start circling us. If she tries to lunge towards them she is very, very strong. The other owners seem to think it is highly amusing to watch me keeping a leashed Rottweiler controlled while they do nothing to control their loose dogs. To her credit, the dog has never even barked back at them and I do try to keep the leash loose. However, should I decide to let her 'play' with them as she clearly wants to do, if she hurt them I'd no doubt be the one in trouble. I don't take her to the park anymore now because sometimes it seems that I am the only person in my area trying to exert control over a dog

  11. #31
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    Based on what you describe the leash breaking was an accident...so again, not a 'fault' thing.
    Doesn't matter. It was an accident, but you still are liable for a dog breaking free of it's leash. As an owner, you are responsible at all times for controlling your dog. Just because you tried to control the dog and failed doesn't excuse you of liability. I see too many people who cannot control their dogs, or do not have them properly leashed. This is an accident which should be prevented by proper training/leashing.

    Both parties are at fault, and both are irresponsible dog owners. The poodle owner doesn't have a leg to stand on as he/she allowed it to roam, and the boxer's owner had no control over an aggressive and powerful dog.

    This - I regularly look after and walk my son's dog while he is at work (she's a 20-month-old boisterous Rottweiler). She is always leashed with both a head collar and body harness and I have been to obedience lessons with her. But, she is a breed with a chase (and herding) instinct and I am just heartily sick to death of walking her through my local park and being endlessly approached by unleashed small dogs who run up to us yapping, dancing around, snarling, sniffing, etc., sometimes in groups if the owner is 'walking' a few dogs at once. There are also some very large dogs unleashed regardless of whether there are children around. She of course then tries to run with them or becomes agitated if they start circling us. If she tries to lunge towards them she is very, very strong. The other owners seem to think it is highly amusing to watch me keeping a leashed Rottweiler controlled while they do nothing to control their loose dogs. To her credit, the dog has never even barked back at them and I do try to keep the leash loose. However, should I decide to let her 'play' with them as she clearly wants to do, if she hurt them I'd no doubt be the one in trouble. I don't take her to the park anymore now because sometimes it seems that I am the only person in my area trying to exert control over a dog
    This is the unfortunate truth. If everyone took their responsibilities as dog owners as seriously as you do, it would be much easier. You wouldn't be at fault if your leashed dog attacked a loose dog approaching it, but why should you be put in that position?
    Last edited by leesaleesa; 07-24-2010 at 05:56 PM. Reason: added quotes

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by leesaleesa View Post
    Doesn't matter. It was an accident, but you still are liable for a dog breaking free of it's leash. As an owner, you are responsible at all times for controlling your dog. Just because you tried to control the dog and failed doesn't excuse you of liability. I see too many people who cannot control their dogs, or do not have them properly leashed. This is an accident which should be prevented by proper training/leashing.
    Another problem, which I found out when my dog was attacked: Never let a child walk a dog that out weighs them. Never let a child walk a dog they are unfamiliar with. Never let a child walk a dog alone. Never let a child walk a dog that is too big for them to hold onto safely. Dangerous for any other dog/animal/person around and dangerous for the child.

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