Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 108
  1. #81

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    10,724
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    31389
    Seeing the illustrations in that article actually made me feel a bit for Kinkaide. What he has done to ruin his art in the pursuit of . The two Chicago Water Tower paintings are especially sad for me. What a waste! Well, at least he got what he wanted for a while. It doesn't seem to have given him a lot of happiness, judging by his recent behavior.

  2. #82

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Two places! Atlanta suburbs and in the North Georgia Mountains
    Posts
    3,807
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    2088
    Quote Originally Posted by Wyliefan View Post
    That's a very good piece. Thanks for the link. I especially like the side-by-side comparison of the first two paintings.

    (I take issue with one commenter's comparison to Jan Karon, though. Karon may be bucolic, but she's not sugary sweet and she's not a sellout. I yield to no one in my loathing for schlocky Christian fiction, and I've got a shelf full of Karon's books, so that just shows you. )
    Wyliefan, I too am a Jan Karon fan, and she is as you said-not sugary sweet nor a sellout at all. As a southerner whose Episcopalian church is actually in North Carolina (only 15 miles from my Georgia home) the books ring particularly true. I think she's a very gifted writer. I don't read any other "Christian" fiction. My reading tends towards the violent/graphic murder mystery genre. Nothing very saccharine about my reading tastes. If Karon was too treacly, I doubt I could stand it. But faith is a part of many of our lives, and a realistic if gentle depiction of a man of faith struggling with day to day issues is wonderful.

  3. #83

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    I Want to Go to There
    Posts
    9,741
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    33370
    At my bookstore, Jan Karon is listed under "Fiction" not "Religious Fiction" so that should tell you something about her writing.
    "Corporation, n. An ingenious device for obtaining individual profit without individual responsibility." - Ambrose Bierce

  4. #84

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    13,423
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    39087
    Quote Originally Posted by Holley Calmes View Post
    Wyliefan, I too am a Jan Karon fan, and she is as you said-not sugary sweet nor a sellout at all. As a southerner whose Episcopalian church is actually in North Carolina (only 15 miles from my Georgia home) the books ring particularly true. I think she's a very gifted writer. I don't read any other "Christian" fiction. My reading tends towards the violent/graphic murder mystery genre. Nothing very saccharine about my reading tastes. If Karon was too treacly, I doubt I could stand it. But faith is a part of many of our lives, and a realistic if gentle depiction of a man of faith struggling with day to day issues is wonderful.
    My background is similiar to yours.
    I, too, read and enjoy Karon.

    A person of faith, who doesn't "pander" to her readers; unlike many "Christian" authors/artists, etc.

  5. #85
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,744
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    People of faith...check out books by Tosca Lee. No "pandering", no schlock. Just a brilliant writer.

  6. #86

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Age
    38
    Posts
    17,608
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by PDilemma View Post
    People of faith...check out books by Tosca Lee. No "pandering", no schlock. Just a brilliant writer.
    I read Demon and liked it. Am hoping to read some more of hers when I get a chance. (I also follow her on Twitter!)
    Charter member of the "We Always Believed in Ashley" Club and the "We Believe in Ricky" Club
    Old, lonely, pathos-hungry, and extremely gullible

  7. #87
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rejecting your reality and substituting my own
    Age
    30
    Posts
    10,981
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    Seeing the illustrations in that article actually made me feel a bit for Kinkaide. What he has done to ruin his art in the pursuit of . The two Chicago Water Tower paintings are especially sad for me. What a waste! Well, at least he got what he wanted for a while. It doesn't seem to have given him a lot of happiness, judging by his recent behavior.
    The San Francisco ones are particularly

  8. #88
    Corgi Wrangler
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Not Wearing Enough Sparkles
    Posts
    6,454
    vCash
    510
    Rep Power
    5546
    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    Seeing the illustrations in that article actually made me feel a bit for Kinkaide. What he has done to ruin his art in the pursuit of .
    High artistic ideals don't pay the gas bill. Unlike the overwhelming majority of people who went to art school, he's at least making more than a living off it and isn't selling at Starving Artist shows in cheap convention centers.

    And everyone arguing about who is or isn't art seems to be coming at it from a Western bias. I'll trade all your Rothkos for Hokusai and Hiroshige.

  9. #89

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    City of Blinding Light
    Posts
    15,867
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    10901
    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    ... isn't selling at Starving Artist shows in cheap convention centers.
    No artists are involved in those "Starving Artist" shows. Those shows are of manufactured "art".

    They are manufactured prints, printed on canvas. Paint may then be added either by machine or by hand. Entire thing is done overseas.

    Very similar to Kinkade's process, actually. Hmm...
    Use Yah Blinkah!

  10. #90
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,744
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Wyliefan View Post
    I read Demon and liked it. Am hoping to read some more of hers when I get a chance. (I also follow her on Twitter!)
    Tosca is a friend of mine. Read Havah. It's brilliant. Absolutely brilliant!!

  11. #91

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Gwyneth Paltrow Fan Club headquarters
    Posts
    17,195
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    27230
    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    And everyone arguing about who is or isn't art seems to be coming at it from a Western bias. I'll trade all your Rothkos for Hokusai and Hiroshige.
    Kinkade is a Western artist, so I think it makes sense to assess his art in the context of other Western artists. I wouldn't call it "bias".
    We live in an ageist society where everything is based on youth, but I hated being 18. I don't like teenagers any more now than I did then. I'm 49 now and there is no way that I'd go back to my teens and 20s - even if I knew what I know now, I don't want to go through all that again. I found it a very difficult time. - Buzz Osborne of the Melvins

  12. #92
    Saint Smugpawski
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cutting Down Privet Because Food Prices Are Going Up Next Year
    Posts
    11,697
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    32994
    My black velvet Jesus is Grade A authentic Hecho en Mexico, baby.
    The fastest thing out of New Jersey since Tricky Nicky in a Muscovian handbasket

  13. #93

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Singleville aka 7th Circle of Hell
    Age
    34
    Posts
    12,381
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    9520
    Quote Originally Posted by Southpaw View Post
    My black velvet Jesus is Grade A authentic Hecho en Mexico, baby.
    Please. Clearly, you know nothing about art. My Dogs Playing Poker on 72' canvas that I got at Big Lots is the real thing.

    Black velvet Jesus paints are so sacriligous--everyone knows that the only True Black Velvet paintings are of Elvis.
    "The practice of sport is a human right. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport, without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play." –Olympic Charter

  14. #94

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    My house
    Posts
    4,841
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    13314
    to quote Lisa Turtle~ "What is art? Are we art? Is art art?"

  15. #95
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Turzynbaeva is the new Gedevanishvili
    Posts
    8,458
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    kinkade sucks.

  16. #96

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Age
    38
    Posts
    17,608
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by PDilemma View Post
    Tosca is a friend of mine. Read Havah. It's brilliant. Absolutely brilliant!!
    I'm going to, just as soon as I can plow through a few of the books overflowing my shelves. I keep hearing how good it is.
    Charter member of the "We Always Believed in Ashley" Club and the "We Believe in Ricky" Club
    Old, lonely, pathos-hungry, and extremely gullible

  17. #97
    Saint Smugpawski
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cutting Down Privet Because Food Prices Are Going Up Next Year
    Posts
    11,697
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    32994
    Quote Originally Posted by Matryeshka View Post
    Please. Clearly, you know nothing about art. My Dogs Playing Poker on 72' canvas that I got at Big Lots is the real thing.
    , indeed. Everybody knows that Dogs Shooting Pool is the real masterpiece.
    The fastest thing out of New Jersey since Tricky Nicky in a Muscovian handbasket

  18. #98
    Prick Admin
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Having a kiki
    Posts
    42,344
    vCash
    506
    Rep Power
    22152
    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post

    And everyone arguing about who is or isn't art seems to be coming at it from a Western bias. I'll trade all your Rothkos for Hokusai and Hiroshige.
    I guess all the Japanese galleries that own Rothkos must have a Western bias as well.

    http://kawamura-museum.dic.co.jp/en/...rk_rothko.html

    In any case, comparing Hokusai and Hiroshige and Rothko is about as useful as comparing apples and oranges.

    My favourite out there art exhibition was something called "Licked Room".

    'Licked Room', first performed for the Estonian exposition at the 49th Venice Biennial 2001, will be played across three video monitors in a purpose-built room within the gallery. On the morning of the exhibition, Semper will lick the walls and floor of the space, alone in the room apart from her camera man. Once the room has been licked the space will be sealed and there will be no entry until visitors arrive that evening. The audience walks through the space potentially unaware of the voyeuristic event.
    Equal parts and
    To think that fun is simple fun, while earnest things are earnest, proves all too plain that neither one thou truthfully discernest.

  19. #99

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    10,724
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    31389
    Quote Originally Posted by allezfred View Post
    My favourite out there art exhibition was something called "Licked Room".
    Equal parts and
    Mainly for me. Do they offer prophylactic antibiotics to the visitors at the gallery entrance -- or perhaps afterwards (so as not to spoil the surprise), once they realize what they may have "absorbed" from their experience?

  20. #100

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    5,958
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    6943
    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    Kinkade - I don't fault him for what he's done with his career, although it seems too bad; he used to actually be good, and by that, I mean that his work was genuinely meaningful, not formulaic.

    One of my favorite articles about him is this one:
    http://www.firstthings.com/blogs/fir...ntasy/#respond

    One of the things I find fascinating about him is that he uses something that kind of models the old "factory" process. He touches each piece that people buy... but that's about it. Those prints won't be worth anything in future, IMO.
    Thank you -- what an interesting analysis, in a publication where I would never have expected it. I really liked that first Chicago Water Tower picture -- that really did show tremendous talent. Too bad he went to the factory mode with more and more light. (Though I wonder whether he might have some vision impairment that dims his vision -- he wouldn't be the first artist who headed in a certain direction because of eye issues.)

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •