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  1. #61
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    I love comic sans. It's fun. Especially in purple!

    However, I wouldn't use it for business stuff.

    Trebuchet MS is one that I like to use in letters.

    I have to go and look at Word to see this Papyrus that everyone hates. ETA: Oh, yeah. That one's weird.

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by sk8er1964 View Post
    I have to go and look at Word to see this Papyrus that everyone hates. ETA: Oh, yeah. That one's weird.
    Papyrus Watch! I wonder if we have reached orange threat level status yet?

  3. #63

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    I don't mind Papyrus that much when used in moderation. A headline is fine. As the main body of text, no so much.

    When I was in high school (late 90's), our journalism department got new computers, hence a new set of fonts. That's when I was first introduced to Comic Sans. And I am ashamed to admit, that as one of the editors of the yearbook, I agreed that our main fonts should be Times New Roman and Comic Sans. So it was featured very heavily in a 200+ page yearbook. My only defense was that I was young and that Comic Sans hadn't been overused by that point. But at the end of the day, I'm still a contributor!

  4. #64

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    I do have to say I've learned something from this thread. I never realized how passionate people can be about fonts. As long as I can read it and it fits with the high level business or personal use requirements I don't care what font it is.
    "Half the harm that is done in this world is due to people who want to feel important. They don't mean to do harm -- but the harm does not interest them. Or they do not see it, or they justify it because they are absorbed in the endless struggle to think well of themselves." – T.S. Eliot

  5. #65

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    I despise Arial. I know most can't tell the difference between Arial and Helvetica, but I can...I really should purchase it so I can enjoy it on my computer (or else just get a Mac )

    So for sans serif, Helvetica is the way to go. Akzidenz Grotesk and Univers are also very bad ass. Very modern.

    As for serif fonts, Garamond cannot be beat.

    I've always had a thing for Fixedsys, I don't know why...it's so in-your-face bold. It gets me hot or something. I think its a better monospaced font than Courier.

  6. #66

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    I spent a long time playing with the font on my CV to get one that looked right. It had to be professional, but modern, and go with the font I used to label each section. I spent hours on it.

    Oddly enough, after those few hours, I settled on Arial
    One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.

  7. #67
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    Oh god, I'd forgotten all about Univers - or blocked it out, more like. At my college, graphic design majors aren't allowed to do any work on computers until their third year. So the first two years are spent CUTTING UP sheets and sheets of Univers letters in all weights and sizes, then carefully arranging them and setting them with Studio Tac.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by luna_skater View Post
    http://www.veer.com/products/type/

    Not that I'm biased or anything.
    Ooh! Pretty!

    Yeah I wasn't really into fonts before, but I took a typography class and it has edumacated me.

    I still can't recognize a lot of them.

  9. #69
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    Oh Papyrus. One of my biggest issues with Avatar was the use of that freaking font for subtitles.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by luna_skater View Post
    I'm in the design/stock industry. Gems like this get passed around all the time at the office.
    I want more!

    Quote Originally Posted by sk8er1964 View Post
    I have to go and look at Word to see this Papyrus that everyone hates. ETA: Oh, yeah. That one's weird.
    There is really nothing wrong with Papayrus. It is a display type and should not be used as body type. Most display types look weird and unprofessional in body.

    Quote Originally Posted by alchemy void View Post
    I despise Arial. I know most can't tell the difference between Arial and Helvetica, but I can...I really should purchase it so I can enjoy it on my computer (or else just get a Mac )
    I say, get the Mac. I don't think Arial is so much like Helvetica, I think it looks more like Futura.

    So for sans serif, Helvetica is the way to go. Akzidenz Grotesk and Univers are also very bad ass. Very modern.
    I like Helvetica, I forgot about Universe too. Probably because it's hard to find now. Ahh, the days of Compugraphic and true type fonts. So many fonts have been slightly changed and become some sort of generic so that they can be used without license.

    Quote Originally Posted by vesperholly View Post
    Oh god, I'd forgotten all about Univers - or blocked it out, more like. At my college, graphic design majors aren't allowed to do any work on computers until their third year. So the first two years are spent CUTTING UP sheets and sheets of Univers letters in all weights and sizes, then carefully arranging them and setting them with Studio Tac.
    No spray mount? No Letraset? I love Letraset. It was great for creating really cool letter blends. You could cut them apart and only put down what you wanted to use. I still have some, but it;s probably dried out.

    Okay, a quiz, who knows what rubylith is?
    And who here has ever done actual mechanicals?
    Retouched photos with an airbrush?
    Used a photostat camera?
    Shot mezzotints?
    Checked 4 color separations with films of each color for color correctness?
    Who thinks I'm old?

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    No spray mount? No Letraset? I love Letraset. It was great for creating really cool letter blends. You could cut them apart and only put down what you wanted to use. I still have some, but it;s probably dried out.
    I did use spray mount but it doesn't give you the really precise control that Studio Tac does. We literally did stuff letter by letter. I should drag out my old projects and take photos for you - I saved everything because it was such a PITA but still totally fascinating to me (do you think I found my career?! ). My typography class even had to trace the letters HOa in five different fonts.

    I haaaate Letraset. I used it for a few projects later on, but I always seemed to choose materials that rejected having letters rubbed on. Still have a bunch of sheets somewhere. The assignments we were given were dictated that we must use the Univers printouts.

    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    Okay, a quiz, who knows what rubylith is?
    And who here has ever done actual mechanicals?
    Retouched photos with an airbrush?
    Used a photostat camera?
    Shot mezzotints?
    Checked 4 color separations with films of each color for color correctness?
    Who thinks I'm old?
    Rubylith!! When I used to fill in on prepress shifts at work, I used it daily. We had a bunch of different widths of ruby tape, plus those markers (forget the name). I also shot the mechanicals and checked film separations. We did mechanicals when I was in high school for yearbook. By the time I got to college, the paper was digital. Never retouched photos with an airbrush or shot mezzotints, though. I'm not that old but the company I work for is.

    My work got rid of our hulking camera a few years ago and finally forced some of their more random publications to go digital. It looked just like this one:

    http://toto.lib.unca.edu/findingaids...mera%2070s.jpg

    Wheeee printing geekery!!!

  12. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by vesperholly View Post
    My work got rid of our hulking camera a few years ago and finally forced some of their more random publications to go digital. It looked just like this one:

    http://toto.lib.unca.edu/findingaids...mera%2070s.jpg

    Wheeee printing geekery!!!
    The newspaper I used to work for got rid of their camera just last year. And it was also to force the smaller newspapers to modernize. Man, we got a lot of cursing and tears sent our way.

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by vesperholly View Post
    I did use spray mount but it doesn't give you the really precise control that Studio Tac does. We literally did stuff letter by letter.
    We didn't have Studio Tac, we used spray mount. When I first started working in GD, we only had rubber cement, which you had to put on both sides to mount and had to use a piece of tracing paper between the sides to position, because it was one shot, not repositionable. But you could rub the rubber cement off with your fingers and make, what we used to call, snot erases (because they looked like - snot ). We used the snot erasers to pick up errant rubber cement, they also were great for erasing light pencil marks. Before that waxers! They sucked big time. And if it was hot out and you had to bring mechanicals to a client or to the printer, they melted! Try setting single cut out letters with a waxer, you'll want to jump out a window! When I first started, there were no displays on typesetting computers. You could only see one line at a time. So, any typos had to be corrected by inserting a letter or two, three, etc.

    I haaaate Letraset. I used it for a few projects later on, but I always seemed to choose materials that rejected having letters rubbed on. Still have a bunch of sheets somewhere. The assignments we were given were dictated that we must use the Univers printouts.
    Love the stuff! but there is an art to setting it on different surfaces. Mylar is a nightmare.

    Rubylith!! When I used to fill in on prepress shifts at work, I used it daily. We had a bunch of different widths of ruby tape, plus those markers (forget the name).
    A touche pen? You may have used something different. What I used was sheets of mylar with a red or amber film on it. You would place it over a mechanical and lightly cut around areas that were to be blocked out or designated with a PMS color. You had to cur (exacto) very lightly, because you couldn't cut through the mylar, just the film, so that it could be peeled off. There might be 3,4,5,6, layers of rubies on any given mechanical, depending on how many screens/colors you were using. You cut around whatever it was you needed to block/designate and then peeled the colored film away from where you did not want to mask. You could also use the amber/ruby lith for cutting silk screens.

    I also shot the mechanicals and checked film separations. We did mechanicals when I was in high school for yearbook.
    I really liked doing mechanicals, the days of ruling pens and rapidographs . Cutting lithos for color knock outs was fun. I could cut anything with and exacto. About 15 years ago I did art for silk screening and sent them a mechanical. Sadly, they didn't know what it was. I actually had to go to the printer and show them what to do.

    Never retouched photos with an airbrush or shot mezzotints, though.
    I once had to do a brochure for an Italian furniture company. They made these very ornate and enormous armoires. They shot them in Italy, but only paid the photographer to shoot the 3 door versions. They wanted 2 door versions mortised into their brochures and ads. I had to take the photos and literally peel the emulsion off the paper backing. Cut a door out and piece together the rest of the armoire, then air brush the cuts out. I also got to silhouette 35mm chromes!

    My work got rid of our hulking camera a few years ago and finally forced some of their more random publications to go digital. It looked just like this one:

    http://toto.lib.unca.edu/findingaids...mera%2070s.jpg

    Wheeee printing geekery!!!
    We had one of those! Yay! The industry has changed so radically. In some was it's good, but in some ways not. It's fun to reminisce.

    Quote Originally Posted by nerdycool View Post
    The newspaper I used to work for got rid of their camera just last year. And it was also to force the smaller newspapers to modernize. Man, we got a lot of cursing and tears sent our way.
    Well, what in the world will we now do with our proportion wheels?
    Last edited by cruisin; 06-12-2010 at 04:48 AM.

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