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  1. #21
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    I use Times New Roman at work, but their default is Arial, although nobody uses it there, so don't know why it's our default. Personally, I prefer Comic Sans MS

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erica Lee View Post
    The general rule that's been taught to me is that sans serif fonts are easier to read on screens, while serif fonts are easier to read in print. I don't really necessarily observe this personally, though.

    However, I am opposed to Times New Roman no matter what the context - just because it's the default, and therefore overused. Also because it's the default and if people leave it as the font they use, there's the connotation that they didn't care enough to take the time to purposely select a font or think about what would be best. But that's just me.
    I disagree re: Times, and the idea of not caring enough to select something different, in most contexts. What should the reader be noticing about the document? The message you're trying to get across? Or the font?

    IMO, in most contexts (business letters, memos, papers submitted for school, etc.) the font should be unobtrusive - not noticed. And the emphasis should be on legibility. That usually means using Times New Roman or another similar font for the body of the document, if the document is to be printed; and Helvetica/Ariel or similar if it's to be read on-screen.
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  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Meredith View Post
    I'm sure there's a reason that Courier is still offered; I just don't know what it is. If ever a font should be buried . . .

    IMO
    Courier is often used for proofreading. A document will be changed to Courier for proofing, and all of a sudden, all errors (extra spaces, weird punctuation, etc.) are visible in ways that they aren't with other fonts, because Courier (there's a technical term for this, but I forget) is evenly spaced, unlike other typefaces.
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  4. #24

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    Yes, courier is useful, even if it's really ugly. At the newspaper I used to work at, courier was the default font on the imagesetter (the machine that produces images of the pages on big film). So if we used a weird funky font and the imagesetter didn't "see" that font, it would substitute courier. And courier stands out a lot when it's not supposed to be there (it bunches together oddly), so it was easy to see what needed to be changed.

    And personally, I also loathe Times New Roman and Comic Sans. So overused, and in Comic Sans' case, misused. Arial or Tahoma are my choices for a general sans serif font. Garamond and Georgia for serif.

  5. #25

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    Times New Roman for all internal and external correspondence - this has been everywhere I've worked.I've also gotten away with Garamond at times.

    PPT and Excel, however, has varied, depending on where I was working at the time.

    Currently, for our plan of the week, I use Gill Sans MT, using Broadway for all headlines. I lurve Broadway 'cause it's so Art Deco.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    I disagree re: Times, and the idea of not caring enough to select something different, in most contexts. What should the reader be noticing about the document? The message you're trying to get across? Or the font?
    Also, almost every computer program can read Times New Roman and a few others such as Arial. I don't have a lot of the fonts that have been mentioned on the board, and that could cause problems. Some places have stipulated that work be in Times New Roman because of these compatibility issues.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    I feel that Times New Roman is harder to read on the screen, but not on paper.

    I too like other fonts, but if you send documents electronically, you run into problems with people not having that font installed on their computer. I've even had it happen with PDF's, where it's not supposed to happen.
    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    I disagree re: Times, and the idea of not caring enough to select something different, in most contexts. What should the reader be noticing about the document? The message you're trying to get across? Or the font?

    IMO, in most contexts (business letters, memos, papers submitted for school, etc.) the font should be unobtrusive - not noticed. And the emphasis should be on legibility. That usually means using Times New Roman or another similar font for the body of the document, if the document is to be printed; and Helvetica/Ariel or similar if it's to be read on-screen.
    Highlighting the above two posts as I agree. This is a huge pet peeve of mine, and I come across it all the time in my work.

    Simple is better! If you want the content to speak, then the font should take a back seat.

    And absolutely beware of conversions to other systems and technologies - fine to play around with internal documents, or ones you will print and distribute yourself, but if you are transmitting things electronically, you could be in for a world of hurt.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rex View Post
    Currently, for our plan of the week, I use Gill Sans MT, using Broadway for all headlines.
    Funny that you mention Gill Sans - a former employer used this on everything, without realizing that when they sent documents to clients, the formatting would often change because not all systems have this typeface, and certainly not all printers can handle it.

    Worse, they would send things out in A4 paper size to clients who used Letter sizing, resulting in some very ugly documents with one line appearing on an extra page.


    On a related note - colour. I worked with a company when they created a new logo, using a particularly trendy shade of lime green fashionable at the time. On nearly all screens and printers, it came out looking like puke. Shame on the graphic designers for placing greater importance on designing something cool for their portfolio than something usable for their client!

  8. #28
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    I used to work in the Manuals and Pubs department for a major corporation that took user documentation very seriously. We had a committee whose sole focus was to constantly tweak the template that we used for writing docs. We used Garamond for everything in the body of the document expect bolded text, table headings, and captions. I can't remember what we used for table headings and captions, but bolded text within a sentence used Arial. Headers, footers, sectional headings, and title pages also used Arial. It looked nice in printed format.

    Online documentation, such as online Help, was written completely in Arial because it looks cleaner on-screen.

    LOL about the Comic Sans hatred. I had a boss at another company that not only used Comic Sans in all of her e-mail communication, but also a very large font size and PURPLE text color. This woman taught an e-mail etiquette class. Ha - as if!

  9. #29
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    Occasionally, we'll use Arial at our office. Most of the time, we use Garamond because it uses less ink when compared to most fonts. Impact or Cooper Black are next in line to Garamond when it comes to using less ink. So, if you want to save on ink, use Garamond!
    Angie
    “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” ~ Thomas A. Edison

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bev Johnston View Post
    LOL about the Comic Sans hatred. I had a boss at another company that not only used Comic Sans in all of her e-mail communication, but also a very large font size and PURPLE text color. This woman taught an e-mail etiquette class. Ha - as if!
    COMIC SANS MUST DIE!!!! At least that's what the communications director and graphic designers here believe. As, apparently, do a lot of other folk. And please save the poor bunny from more abuse!

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by vesperholly View Post
    Not a fan of the broken counter lowercase "a"?
    And I tend to write them that way . Probably from hand Greeking headline type for layouts.

    Funny that you feel that serif fonts are easier to read. I find sans-serif to be easier to read, less cluttered. Especially if the type is supered over a graphic.

    And ITA Fonts are totally important, they can be used as a very evocative design element.

    One of my favorites is Palatino. Susan6 beat me to that one . And I like Souvenir.

    For professional use, it depends on what you doing. For traditional industries and for business documents, simple is best. Decorative or display type should be saved for logos, headlines, and ads/package design for more fashion oriented products and indutstries.

    In school we had a project where we had to choose typefaces for a list of different emotions like - happy, sad, beautiful, ugly, angry, tired, celebration, etc. First we had to do it in black and white, then we had to do it again using color. It was fun seeing what everyone chose.

    Isn't Ariel a generic for Avante Garde? And why can I never find true Helvetica or Futura?
    Last edited by cruisin; 06-10-2010 at 06:21 PM.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    Courier is often used for proofreading. A document will be changed to Courier for proofing, and all of a sudden, all errors (extra spaces, weird punctuation, etc.) are visible in ways that they aren't with other fonts, because Courier (there's a technical term for this, but I forget) is evenly spaced, unlike other typefaces.
    It's called tracking for overall letter spacing and kerning for sets of letters that can look awkward with regular spacing. Actually spacing can also be used as a graphic element. As in:

    Y O U C A N S P R E A D W O R D S O R N U M B E R S for a more contemporary look. You can mix uPPeRs and lOWeRs. You can mix STRAIGHT AND ITALICS. You can change up things like dashes and periods for phone numbers ie.: 201.345.6789 is more modern than 201-345-6789.

    I tried to put more space between the words in the spacing example, but when I hit save it won't do it. so it's a little hard to read.
    Last edited by cruisin; 06-10-2010 at 05:36 PM.

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    Palatino is what I like to use for personal correspondence -- I also like Garamond. I once tried writing a letter using French Script, and it was almost undecipherable even to me! For an informal club newsletter I used Tahoma and Verdana. At work, we are pretty much stuck with Times New Roman as the mandated font for official business correspondence, but the communications group uses Calibri a lot for internal stuff. Courier does make for easier proof-reading -- as someone posted up-thread, the typos, spacing errors, and misspelled words just seem to jump out at you.

  14. #34

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    Funny that you mention Gill Sans - a former employer used this on everything, without realizing that when they sent documents to clients, the formatting would often change because not all systems have this typeface, and certainly not all printers can handle it.
    Apparently it is what they've always used, and plus, it's a proprietary document for the command's eyes only - no one who doesn't work here gets to see it. Plus the final version goes into PDF format. I don't mind it, but I guess I could change it if I wanted to - I changed the headline fonts. Power - I have it now .

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupid View Post
    I use Times New Roman at work, but their default is Arial, although nobody uses it there, so don't know why it's our default. Personally, I prefer Comic Sans MS
    NOOOO THE ABOMINATION!!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    COMIC SANS MUST DIE!!!! At least that's what the communications director and graphic designers here believe. As, apparently, do a lot of other folk. And please save the poor bunny from more abuse!
    AAAAAARGH!

    Seriously though, I think I hate seeing Papyrus more because people think they're actually being clever designers when they use it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Meredith View Post
    I'm sure there's a reason that Courier is still offered; I just don't know what it is. If ever a font should be buried . . .

    IMO
    I know that screenwriters still use Courier. In fact, it's standard in the industry because it's the most common monospaced font. It's easy to deduce the length of a movie or how long a scene is going to be, because when you type out a screenplay on Courier, it roughly works out to one page per minute.

    I'd say that's a pretty convenient way to calculate time with type.

    Quote Originally Posted by Simone411 View Post
    Occasionally, we'll use Arial at our office. Most of the time, we use Garamond because it uses less ink when compared to most fonts. Impact or Cooper Black are next in line to Garamond when it comes to using less ink. So, if you want to save on ink, use Garamond!
    Actually there was a study that concluded Century Gothic used the least ink. So Angelskates may be onto something here.

    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    I disagree re: Times, and the idea of not caring enough to select something different, in most contexts. What should the reader be noticing about the document? The message you're trying to get across? Or the font?

    IMO, in most contexts (business letters, memos, papers submitted for school, etc.) the font should be unobtrusive - not noticed. And the emphasis should be on legibility. That usually means using Times New Roman or another similar font for the body of the document, if the document is to be printed; and Helvetica/Ariel or similar if it's to be read on-screen.
    Right, but even though business correspondence should be unobtrusive, using only the default implies that you don't think your stuff should stand out. Design is all about presentation.

    Of course, it depends on the correspondence as well. Papers and essays should be submitted in a default font cause there, it's wholly the work that's being judged, not the look. I think for memos or announcements (or anything that involves your "public image", a little care could go a long way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    Right, but even though business correspondence should be unobtrusive, using only the default implies that you don't think your stuff should stand out. Design is all about presentation.
    In my field, most business documents are all about business so anything but a standard font would stand out in a bad way instead of improving public image. We use Verdana as our standard. It's even used for announcements of promotions, retirements, etc.
    "Half the harm that is done in this world is due to people who want to feel important. They don't mean to do harm -- but the harm does not interest them. Or they do not see it, or they justify it because they are absorbed in the endless struggle to think well of themselves." – T.S. Eliot

  17. #37
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    I love Century Gothic (I hate the broken "a" as well!), but most of my papers for school are always typed in Times New Roman or Arial.

    At my job, however, fonts play a really big role in how we present ourselves. There are SUPER strict rules about which fonts we can use and for what (we have custom fonts that don't come standard with most word processors, but their names are escaping me right now), and I think that it does help with branding and ensuring that everything released from the office as a uniform, polished appearance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by silverstars View Post
    I think that it does help with branding and ensuring that everything released from the office as a uniform, polished appearance.
    It does, not really internally, but outside of the business. And especially any font that is associated with the logo, including a slogan if used.
    Continuity is also important, it gives everything a more polished look. You can change things up a bit by bolding, italicizing, U/L, or all caps (nothing we don't do here ).

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    I know that screenwriters still use Courier. In fact, it's standard in the industry because it's the most common monospaced font. It's easy to deduce the length of a movie or how long a scene is going to be, because when you type out a screenplay on Courier, it roughly works out to one page per minute.
    "Monospaced". That's the term I was trying to come up with re: Courier in my earlier post. Thanks.

    This is true for the publishing industry as well, in my experience. Most publishers that I'm familiar with require that submissions be sent in in Courier.
    Last edited by GarrAarghHrumph; 06-10-2010 at 07:43 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post


    Right, but even though business correspondence should be unobtrusive, using only the default implies that you don't think your stuff should stand out.
    Using something different would *not* be a good idea in all of the companies I've ever worked for. It implies that you care more about the typeface than about your content. It's distracting, because it's different. It implies that your stuff should stand out for how it looks, not for what it contains.

    Doing so would detract from my public image, not add to it. I think it's important to know your company/industry on this one.
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