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  1. #41

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    I used Wipe Out, which isn't sold now, and put the tiniest drop on the centre of the plants. The grass all around the plants turned yellow, but the plants are still green and growing!

    I'm leery of using these sprays because the two cats go outside whenever they feel like it. The plants obviously don't spread by seed, because I haven't let them bloom in two years.

    On the other hand, the pond is looking good, and the water lily pads just reached the surface. Fish are still alive, even though the little cat drinks from their home. And the hosta's are looking good. So not everything is bad.
    Last edited by KatieC; 05-08-2010 at 03:55 AM. Reason: grammar mistakes!

  2. #42
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    My garden looks like Jurassic Park right now. Spring has come very early, and being away all last week and having rain all this week, we have not been able to mow like our neighbours have. *Everything* is in bloom, and there are plants flourishing that I can't even identify - must be weeds, but I tend to let some of them live if they are pretty.

    For those who may want to philosophize about the gardens, Michael Pollan (author of the Omnivore's Dilemma, In Defense of Food and Food Rules) wrote a wonderful book about 20 years ago called Second Nature. It's about developing his own garden in Connecticut some years ago, his battles with weeds, and as he does, his thoughtful reflection on our relationship with nature, especially in the garden. At times it's hysterical as he describes his family's garden growing up, his friend's efforts to grow pot, and his battle with a groundhog.

  3. #43
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    Snow on the mountain is terrible stuff - I shudder when I see that stuff for sale in nurseries. It gets tangled in all the other plants in the garden. What works in this situation is to use one of those small foam paint applicators and dip it in undiluted Roundup right out of the bottle (not the premixed). Paint a little on each leaf and the stuff should die. This method is useful when using a spray bottle might damage other plants, or if you need to be killing weeds when it is a bit too windy.

    As weed killers go, Roundup is one of the safer ones, if used according to directions (mixed at proper strength and applied to the proper target). It breaks down very quickly after application and does not stay in the soil like some of the stuff farmers use.

    I came on this thread to complain that we got a hard frost last night in Central Minnesota after having the mildest spring in years. I did make the effort to cover my blueberries, delphiniums and a few other perennials and lucked out that the minimum temperature was 29F and that was only for a few hours. My bluberries were blossoming heavily this year and I will be really bummed if they froze!!

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    Herbs don't really keep for a long time, they're like other green leafy vegetables, which is a concern if you don't use a lot at once. Thyme and rosemary last longer than others, because they're not as leafy.
    My radio-alarm just woke me up to "The Splendid Table" on NPR. The host mentioned that basil can be washed in cold water, drained completely so there's no water left on it, placed in a plastic bag with the air squeezed out, and frozen.

    Wish I had known that back when I grew basil on my windowsill. I used to make and freeze pesto, but it would have been great to have plain leaves on hand through the winter.

    Here's a link to the program website: http://splendidtable.publicradio.org/

    I don't listen to the radio often, but I always find "The Splendid Table" really interesting when I happen upon it.

  5. #45
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    On Saturday we made our annual pilgrimage to a herb farm, and then yesterday it was such a lovely day that we took the chance and planted all of it. Normally we'd hold off another few weeks, but spring has come so early this year, and all the perennials are already well on their way.

    So we now have a full herb patch, plus a good start on our veggie patch with 5 kinds of heirloom tomatoes, cayenne peppers (I grow them every year, then dry the harvest for use all winter/spring), and a horseradish. We've had no success with root plants so far, but I thought this was worth a shot. If I can get one decent horseradish, I can pickle it for the winter. It's essential for our favourite sandwich, Beef on Weck.

    I also bought serrano pepper seeds, and will fill in a couple of blanks in the garden with a few other veggies (some kind of bean, maybe some cucumbers), and flowers here and there for colour.

    Another project will be a potato bucket - from a new book I just picked up by the author of You Grow Girl called Grow Great Grub.

  6. #46
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    OMG one of my little strawberry plants has a TINY STRAWBERRY on it! Last week I only saw one flower so I figured I'd might as well let it do its thing. Hopefully the birds won't find it.

    And one of my tomato plants has gone nuts. 4 tiny new tomatoes on it from the last time I checked, along with the ones from earlier that are still growing. And the bean plant that survived the winter and has popped out one flower so far...has a bean growing from that one flower. Tenacious little guy.

    It's so much fun finding little baby fruits.

  7. #47

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    Garden is done. I planted some pink daylilies, irises, english lavender, mini hybrid roses, hostas and daisies (a variation on the norm they are purple and light purple varieties and just so pretty!!) The theme is pink, purple and white instead of the blue pink and white originally planned. I also have to transplant my crocus and some of my forget-me-nots.

    I also planted some other bell like plant which name escapes me. lol.

    I didn't plant a lot and I am still fighting a battle with that bloody snow on the mountain but I was told about another mix of 4 cups vinegar, 1/2 cup salt and 2 tbsps of dish detergent that seems to be killing just about anything lol!

    I just have blueberries, strawberries and rhubarb to plant and I am done. I planted some raspberries and I can't wait until next year. I know this year I probably won't get anything.
    ~I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it.~ (Charles R. Swindoll)

  8. #48

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    I've only planted a few perennials - still waiting for Victoria Day for anything else. I seem to spend most of my time digging up past mistakes. Today it was miserable alliums that have multiplied and infested the lupins, hostas, irises and grape hyacinths. So I dug up the entire patch of grape hyacinths, and chucked everything that didn't once have a hyacinth at the top of it. Disturbed several worms but they'll have to get over it. Everything that smelled even vaguely of onions got pitched.
    Rhubarb and raspberries seem to be doing well.

  9. #49
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    I severely neglected my flower garden (think English cottage garden) for 2 summers and it became completely choked with couch grass. No matter how much I dug out and pulled, it just kept coming back every week.

    I couldn't use roundup because it would have killed all my perennials. So I bought a couple of rolls of landscape fabric ($25) and a truckload of mulch ($120) and coverered all of the soil in my garden with the fabric and 4 inches of mulch, cutting narrow holes for my plants. I didn't have to weed at all, except for pulling the odd spear of couch grass from the middle of daylilies, for three years. If I wanted to add a new plant, I would just carefully cut a hole in the fabric under the mulch.

    Last year I felt it was safe to remove the fabric and mix the mulch into the soil. I still have very few weeds this year, but I think I'll probably remulch next spring.

    It was the best $145 I've spent on my garden. (It measures 20 feet by 12 feet, if you want to relate the cost to your own garden.)
    ‎"You emerge victorious from the maze you've been travelling in." Oct 21,2012- Best Fortune Cookie Ever!

  10. #50

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    My gardener was here yesterday and did a nice job weeding/cleaning up/getting the beds ready for spring and summer. But he didn't call me before he came, as he said he would when I talked to him a couple weeks ago about coming over, so I didn't get a chance to tell him that I wanted to have some flowers planted - grr. I guess next year, I need to buy flowers in advance when I first call, for him to plant. Last year, he planted some geraniums and some thin purple flowers (no idea what they were, lol), but I was home then b/c I was having some inside work done, so I was able to talk to him about it. Anyway, I don't want to pay extra so I'm going to plant flowers myself - it's only a couple small areas where there aren't bushes or perennials already planted, I just want to fill in some bare spots.

    Saturday, I'm going to go to a local garden store to get some annuals. Any suggestions? I just want to add some color to the beds. I think I'm also going to grow some veggies this year, but I think I'll probably grow those container-style on my deck. Last year, I had success with tomatoes, not so much with cucumbers and zucchini.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debbie S View Post
    Saturday, I'm going to go to a local garden store to get some annuals. Any suggestions? I just want to add some color to the beds.
    I don't know a lot about flowers, but last year we had great success with impatiens, and plan to put them in again this weekend. They bloom all summer and into fall, have a nice array of colours, and with their dark leaves seem to do OK in less than full sun conditions. They are also low to the ground, so nice at your borders and edges.

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenny View Post
    I don't know a lot about flowers, but last year we had great success with impatiens, and plan to put them in again this weekend. They bloom all summer and into fall, have a nice array of colours, and with their dark leaves seem to do OK in less than full sun conditions. They are also low to the ground, so nice at your borders and edges.
    Impatiens are best in full shade. They are one of few annual plants that provide excellent color in shade.

    There are lots more choices in full sun areas.

  13. #53

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    I always had good luck with impatiens at my old house, where they got some sun and some shade. But at my new house the front of the house gets almost no sun, and the impatiens did not like it there at all. I'm still pondering what to plant by my front steps, in full shade...

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by sk8pics View Post
    I always had good luck with impatiens at my old house, where they got some sun and some shade. But at my new house the front of the house gets almost no sun, and the impatiens did not like it there at all. I'm still pondering what to plant by my front steps, in full shade...
    My mom told me hydrangeas or begonias like full shade. I have a tree in my (small) backyard and right now there's nothing at all growing under it. But I haven't tried anything yet. Still on my list.

  15. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    My mom told me hydrangeas or begonias like full shade. I have a tree in my (small) backyard and right now there's nothing at all growing under it. But I haven't tried anything yet. Still on my list.
    Thanks for the tip. Maybe Saturday I'll try finding something....

  16. #56
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    We have a very shady spot under a tree, and have planted a hosta garden there. There are many different varieties, so you can get a lovely assortment of leaves in different shades and patterns, and they do also produce small flowers.

  17. #57

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    Paid a visit to the garden store today (paid being the key word, lol). That place is addictive! I wish I had a bigger garden. I ended up buying 5 bright purple/pink geraniums, 5 'supertunias' (hybrid, it said) that are light purple on the outside with a dark purple center, 3 dark purple zinnias, 2 'patio tomato' plants, 2 bell pepper plants, 2 containers to plant the veggies in, 1 herb garden (container), and 1 large bag of potting soil (and a partridge in a pear tree ).

    I'm going to plant the geraniums in the front bed and the purple flowers in the side bed that runs along the deck. The veggies will grow in containers on the deck - last year, the HOA said they'd allow the growing of veggies on a "trial basis" and there hasn't been any word on whether they are in or not this year, but I figure if they grow on my deck, they're considered plants, which I don't think are regulated, so that should keep me from running afoul of the garden police (I would actually like to move, but that's a whole other story).

    I hope I'll have better luck with the peppers than I did with the cucumbers and zucchini last year. The tomatoes I bought said they could be grown in a basket or container, so I'm hoping I'll get good results, given that they seem to be designed for my growing conditions.

  18. #58

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    I found saskatoons at the Canadian Tire so I planted those too. So excited about the fruit I will get from them as I much prefer saskatoons to blueberries.

    Just found out that the purple daisies that I got that I was so proud of are annuals. booooooo! So now I have to fill those 3 spots next year. I wanted to avoid that. Oh well. I am just happy that everything is done, planted and while this year I might not reap with the reward, next year I will.
    ~I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it.~ (Charles R. Swindoll)

  19. #59

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    I got three of four pots planted yesterday - and two window boxes. (I pretended I was a tourist - and kept planting in the rain.) Plus I finally put in the lavender and holly bushes. Still have all the coleus to put in - and searching because I lost a favourite over the winter and haven't seen it yet in any nurseries.

  20. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Twilight1 View Post
    I found saskatoons at the Canadian Tire so I planted those too. So excited about the fruit I will get from them as I much prefer saskatoons to blueberries.
    The birds are going to love you. Birds will eat them green. We have some of them as well, and they are so pretty when they bloom.

    The weather in the prairies have sucked this year. My sil and I planted a lot of things in her greenhouse: tomatoes, petunias, pansies, squash.......and if it's not too cold at night, it's been raining. Today there is a gale force wind, I had to go move plants from our deck so they wouldn't get wind whipped. Where did the normal temp spring go????
    Gone crazy. Be back soon.

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