What exactly is a "Medical Assistant"?

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by dupa, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. bardtoob

    bardtoob Well-Known Member

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    ^ Might I say that there are very incompetent people that are overemployed and very competent people that are underemployed. This does not reflect the job title or function of "medical assistant" but the labor market as a whole.

    There are some that miscalculate the height of a person. There are some that miscalculate the rewards of prolonged military commitments. The difference is that one went to vocational school, because that is what their resources allowed, so now they calculate incorrectly in inches while the other was a legacy admit at prestigious schools, because that is what their resources allowed, so miscalculated in Trillions of Dollars.

    Conversely, there are some that were doctors in their homeland, but now they are self-employed as convenience store owners. There are some that are middle aged that had no opportunity for higher education although they were very bright, so they are now construction workers.

    ETA: Sometimes it is a clinic's policy to adjust certain measurements to compensate for added height by shoes and added weight by clothes. However, an inch or pound or two or even three will not changes a person's BMI calculation much.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2011
  2. Debbie S

    Debbie S Well-Known Member

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    I don't think I said anything about "medical assistants as a whole." I was responding to Numbers' post with a similar story from my experience.

    I'm not sure what the Bush administration has to do with the training of medical assistants, but as far as this particular person goes, you (and I) don't know what her "resources" were or why she went to vocational school. If you are suggesting her education background prior to vocational school was lacking (and you may be right), even if that's true, it doesn't give her a free pass to screw up - shouldn't a vocational training program in the health care field make sure the people it certifies know basic measurement rules? That is kind of important in health care - mistakes can have scary consequences. How do I know that she correctly measured the amount of vaccine to put in the syringe? Hopefully, she's done it enough (and the amount isn't person-specific) that she knew how to do it right. And I'm still alive, so that's a good sign.

    I took my shoes off before I stepped on the scale.
     
  3. numbers123

    numbers123 Well-Known Member

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    It is a big deal as women age. if ones height begins to shrink, my physician is concerned about bone density and back/spine issues. And reputable clinics would use accurate measurements, not "compensate for added height of shoes." And unless I am carrying rocks in my sweater or sweatshirts, I don't believe that weight should be that different. Unless your clinic weighs you with your winter coat, platform shoes, etc. My doctor's office always has you remove your shoes and coats before weighing.

    Urgent Care clinics have not weighed or measured my height for the very reason you mentioned. Medication dosages are pretty standard for adults. Now when my kids were little, they always were weighed because of the mg/kg dosage recommendations.
     
  4. bardtoob

    bardtoob Well-Known Member

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    I don't approve of it either. Doing something the right way does not take that much more time.

    To those setting the policies and procedures, relevance is everything.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2011
  5. sk8pics

    sk8pics Well-Known Member

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    Not trying to excuse the MA you saw, but tetanus shots always hurt in my experience. Good thing we don't have to get them too often!
     
  6. mkats

    mkats New Member

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    I love people who do this. I can't tell you how many patients I get who say "well, I take a little white pill every morning and a littler white pill every night. No, I don't know what they're for. Why don't you know what it is? It's just a simple white pill." It's worse when it's a new patient and we have no records on them whatsoever...

    OK, now that's just wrong.

    Did you get a solo tetanus shot or a DPT? At least in my experience with the DPTs, it's a thicker mix than some others so it tends to hurt more.
     
  7. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    In general, I think competence tends to be systemic. Frankly, if I had an MA who wasn't competent, I wouldn't be worried about the MA; I'd be worried about the practice overall. If the MA is incompetent, why is the MA still there? Either the doctor doesn't know the MA is incompetent, which is one problem, or the doctor is willing to accept that kind of incompetence for whatever reason, which is another.

    Either way, the MA isn't the problem.

    I will say that I think a lot of people are quite unreasonable in the way they determine competence. But I still wouldn't go to a practice where I thought the staff was incompetent.

    :lol: My current doctor's office has all the new patient forms online, so I downloaded them and filled them out before I went in. I know how to list my meds, but I took them along anyway because I knew they wouldn't trust me. Sure enough, the MA started asking me suspicious questions about my medication and I dumped them all out of my purse. And I had a fistful of labs from my last doctor to boot. It's amazing how little things like that so obviously raise other people's opinion of your IQ.
     
  8. numbers123

    numbers123 Well-Known Member

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    I can't speak for DebbieS, but mkats is probably correct. The Tdap recommendations are as follows:
    • Adults younger than age 65yrs who have not already received Tdap.
    • Adults of any age, including adults age 65yrs and older, in contact with infants younger than age 12m (e.g., parents, grandparents, childcare providers, healthcare personnel) who have not received a dose of Tdap should be prioritized for vaccination.
    • Healthcare personnel who work in hospitals or ambulatory care settings and have direct patient contact and who have not received Tdap.
    • Adults age 65yrs and older without a risk indicator (e.g., not in contact with an infant) may also be vaccinated with Tdap
    Since this is a newer vaccine, it is probable that the injection site feel different. But please everyone as your HCP about the Tdap.
     
  9. skatemommy

    skatemommy Well-Known Member

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    You want vitamin D3 2000 IU plus vitamin K2 20mg. The magic bullet. We sell a ton of it in our office. It's nickname is K2 D3.
     
  10. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    Is this the brand name? Thanks, I know very little about vitamin supplements.
     
  11. skatemommy

    skatemommy Well-Known Member

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    Reply, no it is generic. PM me if you want my Amway/Quixtar/Nutrilite version available at my website.
     
  12. Debbie S

    Debbie S Well-Known Member

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    That was probably what I got - the D, P, and T combined. Since it's new, I guess that's why it felt different than it did 10 years ago.
     
  13. Twilight1

    Twilight1 Well-Known Member

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    I have clients come in all the time that don't even know what the medication they are taking is even for. They tell me and because I have worked with meds for so long, many of the main heart, bp, chol, diabetes, gastro, and mental health meds I know pretty well. (I have all the pain management ones down pat...lol!!)

    I can't wrap my head around just taking some medication and not knowing what it is for.
     
  14. Aceon6

    Aceon6 Get off my lawn

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    This is a big problem for the elderly. Meds are usually done at the end of an appointment and the patient may already be on information overload. Many don't pick up their own meds at the pharmacy, so don't have the opportunity to go over things with the pharmacist. To top it off, many use pill keepers to aid in compliance, so they don't see the master bottles every day and their memories aren't what they used to be.

    I've encouraged my elderly relatives to make a list and take it to all their appointments.
    x med in y dosage n times a day for condition z​
    Even my sharp as a tack m-i-l has one on her list that she never seems to recall when listing her meds from memory.
     
  15. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    What about patients who say: "Oh I am taking those little white pills. You know, the little white pills that the tall doctor prescribed?" That's my favorite.
     
  16. Twilight1

    Twilight1 Well-Known Member

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    Ya the CPS has what 5000 little white pills? :rofl: At least with the coloured pills you have a fighting chance to figure out what they are with the CPS.

    A few clients have accessed with just a dosette with no Rx bottles. I get out the CPS to figure out the one's I don't recognize on sight. But damn those little white pills give me a hard time. :lol: