What a $1.74 Million Dollar Bathtub Looks Like

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by missflick, Nov 15, 2011.

  1. genegri

    genegri Active Member

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    The photo is perfect for over the toilet. Better yet, both pieces of overpriced trash can go into the same bathroom.
  2. zippy

    zippy Active Member

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    True, maybe, or it could be a case where the emperor has no clothes. Lots of photographs look more impressive when they're blown up big. Some are stunning no matter what size they are.

    This isn't correct; making 100 prints wouldn't cause any appreciable degradation of a negative. For difficult negatives to print, it might take the photographer upwards of 100 prints to get the right result before they even begin to sell limited edition prints. Some photographs might run in editions of 500+, depending on the photographer's choice (and a few fine art photogs choose to not run editions at all, they just print off a copy when someone wants to buy it). If negatives are stored right, they could last for centuries, depending on the type. I've even heard that at the Center for Creative Photography in Arizona, they allow people to print from Ansel Adams' negatives. Not sure if that's true but it would be pretty cool!

    Of course, a limited edition of a digital photograph would be a little different than that of a silver gelatin because each print would be identical since they're being spat out of a printer, whereas with the silver gelatin each would be unique.
  3. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    Sorry but printing from negatives does cause them to age. The exposure to the chemicals, the chance of dust getting on them, them getting scratched, etc all contribute to this phenomena. Yes, you can store them in such a way that this aging is limited, but eventually they will fade no matter how well stored.
  4. zippy

    zippy Active Member

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    Exposure to chemicals? :confused: Well ok, if part of your printing technique is dunking the negatives in the fixer or something, then yes, ok I can see how the 100th print wouldn't look as good as the first. Otherwise, printing just involves passing light through the negative. I suppose eventually, after many, many years of excessive printing from the same negative, the light exposure could cause it to fade just as exposure to any light would, but in practice this is just not a problem. Especially not in so few prints as you say, which might be churned out in a single day. Good printing involves careful safeguarding against the things you cited - handling from the edges of the negative, eliminating dust with a brush specially made for negatives, etc. If printing was so hard on negatives, the great photographs of the earlier part of the 20th century would be much more rare, and watching movies in a movie theater before the digital era would have been prohibitively expensive or impossible, considering how often they'd have to replace the film. But this is off topic.
  5. PeterG

    PeterG Argle-Bargle-ist

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    Enough to feed over seven million hungry people.

    Or you can have a really, really cool bathtub.

    Choices, choices.

    :)
  6. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    I've been a professional photographer and have been shooting film since the 1960 and how to preserve negatives and the degredation of the negative as you make print after print is something we agonized over before the digital era.

    As for movies, fading over time is a big problem which is why many classic films are now being digitally remastered.
  7. zippy

    zippy Active Member

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    ^And I've only been doing darkroom work since I was seven :). I've won international awards and have attended workshops with master printers who never once mentioned this as a concern. I can't find anything online or in my darkroom books that reference this either. However, I did find this interesting article on limited edition prints by Brooks Jenson, a very well-known fine art photographer and the founder of Lenswork: