The Biggest Loser is Back and So is Jillian!!

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by AragornElessar, Jan 15, 2013.

  1. heckles

    heckles Well-Known Member

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    Some of the school districts in Colorado operate year-round so that the students choose which three months they want off, so some of them take winters off to ski. Skiing and other individual sports can be great for many introverts, including those on the Autism spectrum.
     
  2. taf2002

    taf2002 flower lady

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    I watched a season of BL & I was appalled at its methods. When you have a mountain of donuts & make someone "take one for the team" stuffing their face, what kind of message are you sending? Healthy, nutritious food can be delicious - why not promote that instead of implying that nothing will live up to donuts but you must deny yourself forever? And the intense exercise without proper warm-ups made me hurt. I got shin-splits just watching.

    As for PE, I am not built for sports. I was mediocre at most sports & the worst in foot races. I usually came in last in any race. But I don't ever remember dreading PE. It was a time to hang out with my friends & have fun & give my brain a rest for 45 mins. It never bothered me to come in last. Someone has to...maybe if I had been bullied for it, it would have bothered me, but thinking back I just accepted it as the way things were & there was nothing I could do about it. (Maybe my unconcern about it kept me from being bullied - I don't know.)

    ETA: I did do Pres Kennedy's fitness program in high school & I was the sit-up champion my senior year. My one physical claim to fame.
     
  3. AragornElessar

    AragornElessar Well-Known Member

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    You know, the other times we've had thread for BL, it's always been positive and how the show has inspired the posters to get healthy and lose weight themselves.

    If I'd known starting the thread would turn it into what I've read in the last few days, I never would have.

    I'm done. Enjoy your sniping.
     
  4. jamesy

    jamesy wind up merchant

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    I'm pretty sure we spent the last thread posting about how much we all hated Conda.
     
  5. manhn

    manhn Well-Known Member

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    Well, this thread has inspired me to reconsider square dancing. But I still hate the javelin.

    Yep. Not a very inspiring last season.

    I think Jillian's Biggest Loser persona is probably not how she truly trains folks. She comes off different in articles and radio interviews and podcasts. Generally, if you've motivated yourself and spent the money on a trainer, you tend to do what they order you to do. If you don't like the trainer, you just stop going--you don't go back and whine your way through a session. So, Jillian probably doesn't meet too many people who are reluctant (or outright refuse) to perform the tasks she asks of them. But regardless, I don't have that much sympathy for the contestants as they should know at this point what they're getting into.
     
  6. heckles

    heckles Well-Known Member

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    I suspect that Jillian benefits from the somewhat captive audience she has on the show. Although, those "urban boot camps" are pretty popular right now, so apparently some people do like that type of training. If you want a sweet-and-sensitive trainer, you buy a Richard Simmons DVD.
     
  7. Habs

    Habs Well-Known Member

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    :rolleyes:
    You do know that discussions about a topic/show won't always be positive, right?
     
  8. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    Apparently not :shuffle:
     
  9. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    :shuffle:

    I must say that I had no idea anyone would be so offended by a discussion that has largely focused on PE classes, but there you are.
     
  10. my little pony

    my little pony snarking for AZE

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    well, heckles did say upthread that PE was a source of stress for many people
     
  11. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    that's some mighty revisionist history there :lol: or perhaps just selective memory.

    I missed the first couple weeks. Did they have Jillian arrive at the ranch on a motorcycle, like the last time she returned after taking a season or two off? :rockstar:

    Re: the kinder, gentler approach in the intervening seasons - I think TPTB were just angling for a guaranteed win for poor Bob.

    I was terrible at sports but didn't have strong feelings about PE, but the highschool I went to for grades 10-12 did not ahve PE and we had to do sports after school. In 10th grade, 2 or the 3 trimesters HAD to be competitive sports :drama: The payoff was getting to take "Senior Tennis" in 12th grade, which was completely unsupervised and meant that seniors would just buddy up and head to the tennis courts across the street from the main campus and sit around and talk...and stuff :smokin:
     
  12. taf2002

    taf2002 flower lady

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    :fragile:
     
  13. leesaleesa

    leesaleesa Active Member

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    I may have been drunk at the time, but I swear the last I watched BL that Anna what's her tennis playing name was one of the trainers.

    It seems pretty insane to take morbidly obese people and put them on a treadmill, running at that. I do like watching the contestants getting healthier and transforming. The method is just too extreme for good health, maintaining the weight loss, and never mind the havoc rapid and extreme weight loss plays on the elasticity of the skin.
     
  14. jamesy

    jamesy wind up merchant

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    Good thing they've already been pushing the "you may not be my team but I'm still going to train you" angle because it doesn't look very good for Jillian now. :lol: Poor Sunny is in for a surprise the next time the kids get back to the ranch.
     
  15. Karina1974

    Karina1974 Well-Known Member

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    Part of living a "healthy lifestyle" is getting regular physical exercise. You can eat the "healthiest" food in the world, but if you don't get up off your duff on a regular basis, you will gain weight. And inches. And exercise, keeping the body fit, also generates the spirit and the mind; in fact, you have to strengthen the mind/spirit before you get to the body. It's only when you get to the point where exercise is just part of the daily routine of life, rather than the torturous hardship that too many people make it out to be, that you are rewarded with the body getting in shape. And the focus you bring to that endeavor just naturally spills over into the rest of your life.

    That's been my own experience, anyway. I've been a cyclist for the past 3 years, and have ridden 2577 miles since March 2011 (when I first started measuring my rides). Have there been times I have had to *force* myself to get out on that trail? Yup... but I am a much better person for having gotten out there instead of caving. And I have a level of focus in regards to the rest of my life now that I wish I had had when I was younger!
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013
  16. Karina1974

    Karina1974 Well-Known Member

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    ITA totally with this. I view losing weight/getting into better shape to be a marathon, not a sprint. The goal in reality should be a complete and total lifestyle change, and exercise should be incorporated into routine on a permanent basis, not something to be dropped once you reach some "goal weight." Going from nothing to pounding away on a treadmill is the wrong way to go about it. Too much risk for injury to feet and legs - "spinning" on a stationary bike would be a lot better. Even rapid walking (like race-walking) would be better.
     
  17. Karina1974

    Karina1974 Well-Known Member

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    Too bad they didn't bring in experts on folk dancing, you'd have enjoyed it a lot more. The first things a dance caller must learn is how to break down the dances, explain the calls and the moves that correspond to them, and make any newcomers feel that they CAN DO IT!

    And FYI, Massachusetts just happens to be a MECCA for "traditional" music and dance, like square dancing - New England-style, NOT Western which requires you to take classes before being allowed to participate. Square dancing actually originated in the New England region of the US. Contra dancing is also very popular in Massachusetts, Vermont and New Hampshire. You've obviously never heard of NEFFA, either, one of the country's biggest, most popular folk festivals.

    Contras and squares are EXCELLENT forms of exercise, not to mention provide a social outlet as well. I dance no less than 3-4 times a month, and LENOX, MA is one of the places I go to. There is a contra dance in Greenfield, MA just about every single weekend.

    Also, FYI, at one time, square dancing was included in PE curriculums the country over by national mandate. I found this out last year at a music/dance festival I attend each February in Saratoga Springs, NY (LOTS of people from New England come over for that festival!).

    Um... where did you say you were from, again? ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013
  18. MacMadame

    MacMadame Cat Lady-in-Training

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    Not everyone who doesn't exercise is fat, at least on the outside just like not everyone who exercises is thin. Exercise is about health, not weight.
     
  19. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    Oh yeah, I liked archery too. Only it was camp, not school. I don't think they had bows and arrows at elementary school. And I liked gymnastics because ours was after school, and there was a trampoline - we learned to do flips with a belt (no uneven bars. balance beam, or vault in elementary school). No arrows at school, but a trampoline is ok. Doh!

    I saw both the Conda season and the Vicky/Heba season. They were all bullies/game players, but Conda had such a bad attitude toward her workouts. I think she takes the prize for eye rolling, pouting, and negative attitude in the gym. For that reason, I found her less tolerable than Heba and Vicky.
     
  20. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    This is not a realistic option for most schools.

    At my school, the PE teacher had a master's in dance, which included curriculum on folk dancing. And we all still hated square dancing anyway.
     
  21. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    My music teacher did a wonderful job teaching square dancing, and coming from an extremely rural place there were plenty of opportunities to use the knowledge. Most of my peers still hated it :p

    I have several friends who eat terribly and never exercise. Two of them are the two skinniest girls I have ever met. They actively try to gain weight by eating terrible stuff and still can't.
     
  22. Karina1974

    Karina1974 Well-Known Member

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    Contras and squares are really best experienced by going to an actual dance event. The combination of live music and experienced dancers who have a love of this type of dancing "in the blood" as opposed to having a teacher who may have learned about in college but doesn't necessarily have a passion for it gives a completely different impression to the newcomer than to learn about it in a sterile school setting. My first exposure to Contra (very similar to squares except you are in long lines with as many couples as can fit the length of the room) was at a folk festival 12 years ago next month. I was in a room with roughly 300-400 other dancers, & the only reason I ended up there is because I was dared. Thus... I've been dancing ever since, & now am a volunteer for that festival.

    FYI you'd be surprised by how many young people I see at dances. Even down to teens and younger. And they are just as good as the older folks in their 40's and older who've been dancing since before these kids were born.
     
  23. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    Most schools are not going to provide funding so their kids can go to a contra/square dance.
     
  24. heckles

    heckles Well-Known Member

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    I always thought that the part in square dancing when you move down the line and hold hands with a new partner every few seconds--whatever they call that-- was either a pleasantly athletic alternative to speed-dating, or a really bad idea in cold and flu season.
     
  25. Karina1974

    Karina1974 Well-Known Member

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    :rofl:
     
  26. Karina1974

    Karina1974 Well-Known Member

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    It would actually be easier to bring in a local caller to teach the basics, plus a simple dance. You wouldn't even need to bring in an entire musical group (a solo fiddler or pianist would do). And they could distribute flyers for the upcoming local dances, if there are any. Most dances I attend are only $10/person for 3 hours of dancing, very cheap entertainment as compared to going to concerts or the movies.

    The local traditional music/dance association I belong to is actually exploring the concept of bringing this pastime to the younger generation. If you don't come from a family headed by parents who dance (I've been on the floor with dancers as young as 6-7, including girls who can dance both the man's and woman's roles), the chances of being exposed to it are small, unless you know someone else who does it and who convinces you to come along to a dance some evening. I was brought into it by my older brother, and there are a number of contra/square dancers on both sides of my family, including my own parents who, unfortunately, stopped dancing once they started having kids.
     
  27. heckles

    heckles Well-Known Member

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    First step is to get rid of those awful dresses. They only look good when they're being twirled, and even then I wonder if I should be looking when a lady's underwear is on display. Which can pretty much be said for the average figure skating dress.
     
  28. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    Or even to bring in a single musician or a caller.
     
  29. MacMadame

    MacMadame Cat Lady-in-Training

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    It's not the school's job to help kids fall in love with square dancing.
     
  30. Karina1974

    Karina1974 Well-Known Member

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    That's Western Square Dance fashion, NOT New England Squares/Contra Dance. Our fashion is long, flowy skirts that hit anywhere between the knee and the ankle, and the idea is for them to flow out , not up. Something like what the ladies are wearing in the foreground. Some of the guys even wear skirts, especially in the summer, because you sweat a LOT dancing during the summer months. You'll see the guys changing shirts a lot too, some go through 3-4 T-shirts in an evening.

    God... the idea that I would have to go to a dance with my outfit coordinated to someone else's... I have my own style, and I am always receiving compliments on what I'm wearing - people are shocked to find the "expensive" jewelry I wear mostly comes from Target or Walmart. :D There was a time when to do WSD you HAD to have a steady partner. My parents were a WSD couple even before they were married (mid to late 1960's), and they still have the matching/coordinated outfits. Also, if you are part of a performance team (like the group in red) your outfits are going to match.

    I don't care for Western squares because, in order to attend dances at certain clubs, you have to have taken up to a certain required level of classes, because their moves get very intricate, much more so than Contra or N.E. Squares (which is actually the genesis for Western). Doing hard moves just because they are "hard" just doesn't jive with me, personally. It's a dance, not a contest. OTOH, I've seen 1st time dancers doing contra with some proficiency by the half-time break - they aren't doing the flourishes or fancy improv, but they are pulling off the basics pretty well if they've paid attention during the beginner's lesson before the dance starts.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2013