Swedish Star Evaluation

Discussion in 'Moves In The Field' started by skate or die!, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. skate or die!

    skate or die! New Member

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    What is the Swedish Star Evaluation? Its what my daughters competition will be judged on.
     
  2. meierfan

    meierfan New Member

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    It's the lower level system they created which does not usually require professional judges, since the implementation of the CoP gave the Swedish federation problems with finding accredited judges for all of their competitions. It is used mainly for their C and B skaters.

    I don't remember all of it, but their programs still have to have certain stuff in them, according to the testing system requirements for each level. Only the first half of the skaters will get a "proper" placement, the rest of them will come at a shared placement. Like if there are 12 skaters, the kids will be placed the first 6, the rest of them will be placed in 7th place.

    There is also a "special price" given to one kid in each group for something they did, like nice spins, spirals, spread eagles, interpretation of the music, etc. This price is given by the "head judge" which has to be a judge with decent judging credentials. It can be given to any kid, regardless of placement. The judges (last time I was there, might have changed) are usually higher level skaters, or people with very low level judging accreditation that has not yet received their judging license.

    One thing that is good about these competitions is that each skater gets a personal written evaluation made by the head judge. The star competitions are not as serious when it comes to technical strictness as the ones with professional judges, obviously.

    I hope this helps.
     
  3. marbri

    marbri Hey, Kool-Aid!

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    It might make a difference what the competition is? If you are going there to an international competition it could be slightly different from what meierfan writes.

    For instance I went a few years ago to Stockholm Trophy with a group and for all categories (including the ones that were judged by Swedish Star System) ALL placements were called out. I think that's an important thing to keep in mind if you are coming from a place that doesn't do that in certain categories and certain age groups. If you are coming from a place where every skater after the first 4 places are in "fifth place" then be prepared that if there are 30 children they may be called out in order of finish. Some of our girls were a bit :( when it happened ;)

    At this competition the following categories were judged with the Star system: Springs B girls, Cubs B girls and Chicks Boys and Girls. The program requirements and ages for those groups for Stockholm Trophy 2011are below. Even it you aren't going to this competition but another it should be the same.

    Chicks Boys and Girls, born 2001 and younger:
    Swedish Star Evaluation
    Free program only, 2 min 30 sec +/- 10 sec
    Program should include the following elements:
    Minimum 4 different single jumps, Axel can be included
    One jump combination or sequence with single jumps
    Minimum two different spins
    Spiral sequence or Step sequence
    Double jumps are not permitted


    Cubs B Girls, born 2000 and younger:
    Swedish Star Evaluation
    Free program only, 2 min 30 sec +/- 10 sec
    Program should include the following elements:
    Single jumps
    Maximum of two different double jumps
    One jump combination or sequence
    Minimum two different spins
    Spiral sequence or Step sequence

    Springs B Girls, born 1999 and younger
    Swedish Star Evaluation
    Free program only, 2 min 30 sec +/- 10 sec
    Program should include the following elements:
    Axel and single jumps
    Maximum two different double jumps
    Jump combination or sequence free of choice
    Three different spins including one combination spin
    Step sequence or spiral sequence


    As for the judging system itself I don't have it on this computer. Copy I received is from a few years ago and in another place but from memory I would say the main emphasis in on quality over quantity. They want to see something well done instead of attempts at something more difficult poorly done. The skater with decent skills, flow and nicely executed basic spins and single jumps will benefit against a skater who throws in an ugly double they rarely land or tries to hit difficult positions in spins that fail miserably. Of course if the difficult positions are well executed as well as the jumps that skater benefits. There are values and the coach travelling with the kids there should be aware of the program requirements so that they aren't throwing away points. For instance I recall one situation where the category the child skated in in their own country had a max of 2 spins and the coach never changed that. In the Swedish competition they entered they were allowed a max of 3 spins, would have been simple to throw in another spin at the end of the program. But that was a particularly stupid coach I know who took a lot of skaters over there and only paid attention to one ;) Oh and the judges at this competition were different levels so you can get a mixture, probably because it is an invitational they try to use more experienced judges.

    At the awards they called all skaters onto the ice in the order that they placed. All received a certificate for participation and a sheet with all the skaters placed in the order they finished. They also got a small gift ( hair accessories, maybe gloves, that sort of thing). The results weren't always published on the wall before the award ceremony so it wasn't always known until the kids hit the ice where they placed and it was sort of :( seeing the faces of some kids as the numbers were being called out BUT they got used to it and were prepared for the following year.

    Long post, sorry. But between that and what meierfan wrote you can maybe get a complete picture as I'm not certain what sort of competition you are talking about and whether you are in Sweden?
     
  4. skate or die!

    skate or die! New Member

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    Thanks Marbri and Meierfan,

    It is the same competition the Stockholm Cup that we are hopefully going to. It does say on the entry form that they will be publishing the details on their website but I cant seem to find it. I will have to email them.

    Thanks for all your help
     
  5. sparkle87

    sparkle87 New Member

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    It sounds like this system is similar to the Finnish star system. In the Finnish star system, the kids get 1-8 stars in 7 different fields: basic skating skills, footwork, spins, jumps (x2), spirals, interpretation and presentation. The one who gets the most stars wins and in case of a tie, the skater that has more stars for basic skating skills wins.

    The judges also give special awards to skaters who had exceptionally good spins or spirals or for something that really caught the judges' attention in a good way.
     
  6. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    Cool. That definitely gives more feedback than just a string of ordinals, or even sets of marks like, say, "2.5/2.6."

    So for each area, the skater either gets a star or doesn't get a star?
     
  7. marbri

    marbri Hey, Kool-Aid!

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    I think it's very similar.

    The following is in Swedish so if anyone who can read swedish wants to translate:
    http://iof2.idrottonline.se/ImageVaultFiles/id_1746/cf_78/Bedömarinformation Stjärntävling.pdf

    I am not even close to fluent in Swedish, can only guess on things by comparing them with Icelandic and I would say very loosely translated there are four areas that are judged:

    1. Skating Skills
    2. Technical elements
    3. Transitions
    4. Interpretation/Choreography

    Each area is given a value between 1-10 at 0,25 intervals.
    The points are used to help place the skaters and results worked out in basically the same way as OBO from what I can gather.

    Points:
    1-2 = poorly done
    3-4 = below average
    5-6 = Average/satisfactory
    7-8 = above average/good
    9-10 = very good

    The rest is sort of what I already said. Jumps with falls or landed on two feet have no value. Slow spins with few rotations get mininum value. Repeating the same jump often will reflect negatively in the score so if you have a big trick in you back pocket don't go out and skate it 5 times. They are looking for well balanced programs, cleanly skated with attention given to the music they are skating to. Not underrotated two-footed quad attempts :D
     
  8. marbri

    marbri Hey, Kool-Aid!

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    I don't recall anytime the skaters being judged by the Star system at Stockholm Trophy getting any feedback other than the order they placed. It's possible it was available on request or maybe the coaches got it and chose not to hand it out but I know the skaters I know that went there got no specific feedback.

    Just throwing that out there to be aware of the possibility you might not get something.
     
  9. sparkle87

    sparkle87 New Member

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    Yes, because each area is judged separately, so you can see which areas the skater should develop a bit more and what skills the skater already masters. Judges are usually looking for clean, effortless programs with good basic skating skills.

    For each area, everyone gets at least one star, but you can get up to eight stars. For jumps, the number of stars is multiplied by two.

    Marbri, you translated correctly. Seems like the Swedes are a bit more strict about two-footing jumps etc. But from the pdf I gathered that the goal of the star system is the same: rewarding skaters that skate clean programs and basic skating skills and don't try to do elements that they don't quite master yet.
     
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