Sochi Olympics will test gay rights

Discussion in 'Great Skate Debate' started by Sugar, Feb 7, 2013.

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  1. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    Zhonny is going to be interviewed on NPR's "Here and Now" today. The show happens to be airing on one of my local stations right now (www.wboi.org--click the button at the top of the page that says "news and jazz") but you should be able to go to NPR.org later and find a stream for replay.

    ETA: The segment aired about 45 minutes into the program.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2013
  2. dardar1126

    dardar1126 Well-Known Member

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    http://www.usatoday.com/story/sport...is-sochi-olympics-gay-advocacy-group/2610945/

    Greg Louganis speaks out on Russia's anti-gay law
    Kelly Whiteside , USA TODAY Sports 10:53 p.m. EDT August 1, 2013

     
  3. Gil-Galad

    Gil-Galad Well-Known Member

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    I though that this ship has sailed quite some time ago (link).
     
  4. judiz

    judiz Well-Known Member

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    So now the Russian government says athletes and families will not be subjected to the anti- gay laws during the Olympic games. Since the 1980 boycott had no effect in Russia, I say let the games go on but those who do attend, no unnecessary spending and once the athletes leave Sochi, a full economic boycott should take effect. I also hope that since the athletes will be immune from the law, they will make a point to express solidarity with the gay community during press conferences.
     
  5. caseyedwards

    caseyedwards Well-Known Member

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    Lots don't care that Sochi participants won't be affected because Russians still would be and they want repeal of the law for everyone.
     
  6. BittyBug

    BittyBug Kiteless

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    From the article:

    Wow. :eek:
     
  7. BlueRidge

    BlueRidge AYS's snark-sponge

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    That article on the Pride House is dated March 2012. I was assuming that the new aspect was asking the IOC itself to sponsor a Pride House. This would be a challenge to the law obviously but one which if the Russian authorities didn't allow it would be a direct challenge to the IOC. I don't know maybe it wouldn't work, but anything that prevents the athletes from participating in the Olympics like a boycott or other disruption seems the wrong way to go to me.
     
  8. judiz

    judiz Well-Known Member

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    Again, the USA led a boycott of the 1980 Olympics and all it did was enable Russia to win a lot of medals that would had gone to the USA and other coumtries that did not send their athletes, the same would happen if the USA boycotts Sochi. The Russian government is not going to repeal this law to make other countries happy, they don't care about people's feelings but a major economic boycott of Russian tourism and products might. Avoiding Russia for 10 days in February will have no effect, boycotting Russian made products, tourism and long term economic loses may.
     
  9. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    I think the best way to 'boycott' would be to encourage spectators to boycott, but to send the athletes. Win the medals and take them away- but don't spend money in the country.

    I also think the IOC should be ashamed for not officially reprimanding Russia over this. You can't invite all the world's athletes to your country and then say "Oh, but if your X we're going to imprison you, you're not really welcome." The law basically makes being gay the crime, even if the athlete is perfectly behaved, just being known as being gay can get them into trouble...
     
  10. altai_rose

    altai_rose Well-Known Member

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    I'm still very interested to hear what the sociological or cultural basis for this law is... why homophobia is seen as a threat to the common good.

    The "red-headed" analogy mentioned earlier in this thread was a good analogy, but somewhat flawed because being red-headed is not a behavior. Here's a better analogy: walking in public topless. :) One could argue that certain people (ie, men) can walk around in public topless without any repercussions, but others (ie, women) cannot. A woman walking around topless on a public street would be arrested for indecency. However, everyone can walk around topless in their own home. Are these types of laws discriminatory towards women who want to show the same behavior as men? Similarly, in the Russian law, a certain group of people are not allowed to display certain behaviors in public, as it goes against the cultural and societal "norm," but can do whatever they want in their own home. If I see a woman walking around topless in the middle of the day here in Baltimore, I'd be pretty shocked; I imagine a Russian might be just as shocked seeing 2 guys kissing on the street. So then the question becomes: why are many Russian people wary of homosexuality and view it as a threat?
     
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  11. ks1227

    ks1227 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not so sure about this. A lot has changed in the U.S. around gay issues since 2008. I would be more surprised at this point if NBC chose NOT to cover the controversy, and from a perspective that is sympathetic to gay rights.

    Yes. Off-topic for this thread, but the school where I work just canceled a fairly large study tour to Russia over this very issue, with explicit reasons given to the organizing partners in Russia. This is not to support or oppose a boycott of the Olympics, but we'll spend our gay and gay-friendly dollars elsewhere - and make sure our gay and lesbian students don't have such a hateful law hanging over their heads while traveling.
     
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  12. caseyedwards

    caseyedwards Well-Known Member

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    It's always a part of nbc's coverage of Russians to depict them as an awful enemy with awful people -like what they did with plushenko and lenin and mustafina being a nasty brat -and I have no doubt they would use gay rights in this way. Russia is a total enemy and the people are the worst to NBC! It's a way to produce drama.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2013
  13. dardar1126

    dardar1126 Well-Known Member

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    Twitter:

     
  14. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    The fact that Russia is hosting an Olympics this year provides an opportunity to put pressure on them to change their homophobic policies that may not have occured otherwise. The whole world will be watching - they aren't going to be able to hide what they are doing. I think the best way to battle this is to hit them economically and keep the pressure on - which means keeping it in the news. Boycotts don't work. Running away won't work. We need to go to the Olympics and shine a light on what Russia is doing.

    As for why their Government is doing this? It's political. Russia is having economic problems. It's a classic case of diverting the anger that might otherwise be directed towards govt leaders to a minority group that can't defend itself - by playing to ignorance and bigotry. It's just sad to think that this is supported by such a large percentage of the population.
     
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  15. ehdtkqorl123

    ehdtkqorl123 New Member

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    If Putin wants, anything is possible in Russia.. :(
     
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  16. Gil-Galad

    Gil-Galad Well-Known Member

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    Well, I am not sure this analogy is much better. Because as a woman (in this case in Germany) I might not be able to walk around topless. But I can still talk about nudity, I can talk about breasts to anyone, I can take photos of myself en nude, I can start an online porn-business, I can pose nude for the playboy. And you can read about that part of female anatomy anywhere, in newspapers, schoolbooks about biology, you can buy tons of magazines that concentrate on that part of the female body, you can visit art exhibitions where it is displayed, theatre and ballet productions... And even if my breasts happened to be exposed e.g. by accident (tripping over a maxidress - been there, done that), it wouldn't get me arrested or fined.

    So yes, in contrast to e.g. some societies in Ancient Greece it is considered indecent to expose my breasts in public places, but that's about it.

    What irks me about this Anti-LGBT-law is the totalitarian character, you say that they can do whatever they want in their own home. What if the 12-year-old neighbour catches a glimpse through the window? What if the 14-year-old niece finds some telling magazine and tells her conservative aunt, who never liked that bloke anyway? This law isn't really clear on what constitutes propaganda, which is probably a question lots of Russian gays are asking themselves. Generally laws like these breed hatred and mistrust, I can't imagine in what precarious positions some Russian homosexuals are now.
     
  17. dardar1126

    dardar1126 Well-Known Member

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    Exactly right.
     
  18. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    Not to interrupt Phil's self-promotion as the recipient of this email :rolleyes:, but I believe the IOC already has something to this effect in its criteria. Not that it stops them from overlooking any such laws when they conflict with what the IOC wants to do (e.g. not scheduling a women's ski jump event in 2010).
     
  19. Iceman

    Iceman Well-Known Member

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    Fans, boycott, but let the athletes compete. If you don't go to the Olympics, it's not like you won't get to see the events.
     
  20. PeterG

    PeterG Hanyuflated

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    How do you know this was the only outcome of the boycott? Are you a scholar who has studied boycotts...or protest within sport? Some would argue that the awareness the boycott brought to the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan was in itself a successful outcome.

    Separate sub-topic, someone quoted Johnny Weir:

    Has anyone read anything about how these Olympics cannot be considered to be fair / just / impartial? The gay athletes will be performing under a pressure that the straight athletes will not. Can you imagine trying to compete at an event where a hug of joy could result in your being imprisoned (and maybe beaten)? So the whole premise of a fair sports competition ...will not exist.

    Thank you for this link. So as consumers, we get to think about whether we will (or will not) now support these businesses:

    VISA
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    General Electric
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    Microsoft
     
  21. quiqie

    quiqie Well-Known Member

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    Measures like the ones suggested in this article

    will inevitably lead to isolation of Russia and give rise to nationalistic tendencies, which are already quite strong in Russia. Putin, for one, should be grateful, because the more closed-off the country is, the easier it is for him to rule. However, I'm afraid that establishing the new Iron Curtain won't help the matter with the human rights. If anything, it will make the situation even worse. After all, it was in Stalin times when the persecution of homosexuals first started. Previously in Russia, since before Peter the Great, homosexuality was frowned upon by the Orthodox Church, but it wasn't punishable by law, and it never was punishable by death, unlike in some of the European countries. Homophobia in the modern Russian society stems from the Soviet times, when, due to the large labor camps system and the amount of people who had gone through it and the customs of that institution, gay sex was viewed mainly as a type of sexual intercourse practiced in prison.
     
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  22. judiz

    judiz Well-Known Member

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    When the countries involved said they would boycott the Moscow Olympics due to the invasion, the Soviets did not order their troops to withdraw. The boycott focused attention on the invasion but it did not stop it. Boycotting Sochi will bring awareness to the human rights violations happening in Russia but once the Olympics are over, so will the spotlight on Russia. That's why a protest has to extend past the Olympics and involve all of Russia, not just Sochi.
     
  23. dardar1126

    dardar1126 Well-Known Member

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  24. patinage

    patinage Member

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    35th Annual Vancouver Pride Parade takes place this Sunday:

     
  25. Sugar

    Sugar Well-Known Member

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    Russian lawmaker says gay-propaganda ban should be in place during Sochi Olympics
    3/08/2013 ITAR-TASS
    http://indrus.in/news/2013/08/03/ru...an_should_be_in_place_during_sochi_27963.html
     
  26. caseyedwards

    caseyedwards Well-Known Member

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    The problem is the media taking anyone who speaks as official government position! The law is in place. Whoever the Attorney General or Interior minister is needs to make a decision! And they work for Putin so if they say no prosecutions no police acitivity on this law that will be official!
     
  27. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    You mean, because they didn't agree with you that he should have won? :rolleyes:
     
  28. caseyedwards

    caseyedwards Well-Known Member

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    No - filling up his "fluff" piece with communist symbols was ridiculous.
     
  29. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    Link, please?
     
  30. caseyedwards

    caseyedwards Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Aug 3, 2013
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