Sochi Olympics will test gay rights

Discussion in 'Great Skate Debate' started by Sugar, Feb 7, 2013.

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  1. dardar1126

    dardar1126 Well-Known Member

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    http://en.rian.ru/world/20130731/18...d-as-Russian-Vodka-Sochi-Protests-Spread.html

    US Gay Activists Emboldened as Russian Vodka, Sochi Protests Spread
    This article contains information not suitable for readers younger than 18 years of age, according to Russian legislation.

    Excerpt:

     
  2. BittyBug

    BittyBug Kiteless

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    I did not read that into the term at all, but based on your explanation, I now understand your concern and I apologize for perpetuating the offense . To me the term only invoked Putin's vast authority, so please trust that there were no further cultural insinuations of any kind, and again, I'm sorry to have offended you.
     
  3. caseyedwards

    caseyedwards Well-Known Member

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    I thought it was a funny joke too! But sure replacing Russia with Putinistan could be offensive.
     
  4. attyfan

    attyfan Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone know if any plans are being made for some sort of protest, boycott (perhaps of sponsors) or some other action to be taken against the IOC to get them to factor a country's human rights record in determining host countries?
     
  5. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    Since the Olympics are all about the $$$, boycotting the sponsors would have a really big impact.
     
  6. Asli

    Asli Well-Known Member

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    Such a plan would exclude the biggest countries in the world such as the USA, Russia and China. So I don't think that is possible.
     
  7. dardar1126

    dardar1126 Well-Known Member

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    Instead of boycott, group calls on IOC to host Sochi Pride House
    ' We know that LGBT athletes are not alone in being revolted by these laws and the behavior of Russian authorities'
    31 JULY 2013 | BY GREG HERNANDEZ

    Excerpt:

    - See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/...-sochi-pride-house310713#sthash.LIqggIAR.dpuf
     
  8. love_skate2011

    love_skate2011 Well-Known Member

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    biggest cause of problem with the world; people just cant mind their own business
    sure its atrocious but I would never shove what I want to another country that is an even bigger offense

    imagine if the Olympics were held in Saudi Arabia, would anyone even have balls when it supplies the World crude oil,
    its all about $$$$ or it wouldn't even be a human rights issue if Olympics were in US while US drones drop bombs to children in Afghanistan, lol
     
  9. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes, so LOLsy, children affected by war.

    I've stated repeatedly that I'm against an Olympic boycott, but I don't believe it's inappropriate to criticize laws such as the one passed in Russia and similar abuses, and speaking out about such things is certainly not a bigger offense than the hateful legislation itself. If you want to host the biggest sports event in the world, the spotlight will be shining on you very brightly and bringing attention to all sorts of things.

    And really, ignorance, fear and hate are much bigger problems, with much worse effects, than "people not minding their own business".
     
  10. love_skate2011

    love_skate2011 Well-Known Member

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    all three you mentioned, which all rolls to the precedent ;)
     
  11. Eyre

    Eyre New Member

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    Obviously it is a cultural issue.

    You have answered some of your questions yourself. Compare this Russian law with Nazi Germany law is offensive. Do you want to know what is arrogance? To impose one's own value on other culture and other country's people is pure arrogance!
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  12. Gil-Galad

    Gil-Galad Well-Known Member

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    No, what is really offensive that laws similar to early Nazi laws are still being made - especially in a modern country like Russia where most people can read, have access to education, books and various forms of information.

    But thanks for explanation why so few people boycotted the 1936-games or spoke out against them or staged protests - they were probably respecting Germany's long-standing cutural tradition of Antisemitism.
     
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  13. spikydurian

    spikydurian Well-Known Member

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    No, I don't mean that one President should educate the other. I think Heads of States do talk to each other over the phone. I am suggesting that maybe if President Obama and other Heads of States ring President Putin and voice their citizens' opinions to the Russian parliament, they may reconsider the law.

    Yes, it would be interesting if anyone on FSU steeped in Russian history, law and culture, can give their viewpoints as to how and why the law was instituted in the first place. And what is the reaction of the Russian people towards this law? And if the majority disagree, how can they best communicate to their leaders to change it? Do the majority of Russians have a say in running the country?
     
  14. Sugar

    Sugar Well-Known Member

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  15. dardar1126

    dardar1126 Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  16. Sylvia

    Sylvia On to Nationals!

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  17. Proustable

    Proustable New Member

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    My argument is not that it isn't a cultural issue, but that asserting that it's a cultural issue doesn't make it any less ignorant and hateful.
     
  18. Eyre

    Eyre New Member

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    Criticizing and speaking out against it is one thing. Planning to go into their country to have a public protest during their most important international event, like many here suggested and linked to, is another. I will not sympathize these people if Russia says, get out of my country!
     
  19. Eyre

    Eyre New Member

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    Obviously the law has its cultural base, like US gun laws. Is US gun law ignorant?
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
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  20. Pikachuusb

    Pikachuusb Active Member

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    NO person(native Russian, athlete, coach or spectator) should have to fear for their safety or threat of arrest etc due to ignorance & hatred. The thought that this is even remotely happening in 2013 is mind blowing and disgusting. I feel like we've been transported back to the 1800s :mad:
     
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  21. Proustable

    Proustable New Member

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    Yes.

    But you are missing the point.
     
  22. Eyre

    Eyre New Member

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    Exactly! To me, this law has been created a little strangely. This law might be the result of counter act?
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
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  23. VIETgrlTerifa

    VIETgrlTerifa Well-Known Member

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    I'm happy the Civil Rights Movement in the United States didn't follow those rationalizations. Although I am sure it could have done more had it not been for people being too worried about going "too far."

    I'm sure the LGBTQ population in Russia had so much political power before these laws were in place. I'm sure the pushback was caused by gay and lesbian couples doing things that heterosexual couples were doing. Of course, when "gays" do it, they're shoving it in people's faces or conducting "aggressive LGBT action"...or something. As long as they're not getting killed, then we should just respect the laws, right?
     
  24. love_skate2011

    love_skate2011 Well-Known Member

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    comparing it to Nazism is too much, its terrible but they arent gassed and put into concentration camps
    what this is a mere western issue, outside europe and NA , many countries have draconian and event anti gay attitudes
    change should come from within not some foreign people who think what is right for another country

    we can find many of these in rural America too, if you read Russian history you will learn Russians are illiberal they view liberalism as a threat and foreign made. more than 80% of Russians still oppose public exposure for the third sex, pass a law to legalize gay marriage and you will see close to a hundred million marching to the streets. outside Moscow, St.Petersburg people are still very conservative, many in europe would have culture shock, lol . reminds me there is a popular reality tv now in Russia of people baiting to expose gays and pedophiles and exposing them on TV, if that happened in the US or Europe, I dont know how they would have reacted
     
  25. jeffisjeff

    jeffisjeff Well-Known Member

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    Yes, let's lump the gays and pedophiles together. :rolleyes:

    But, anyway, the Russian TV show you mention sounds like Chris Hansen's "To Catch a Predator" on NBC, which was actually rather popular in the US. But he only went after actual criminals, i.e., the pedophiles.
     
  26. love_skate2011

    love_skate2011 Well-Known Member

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    I didnt, it was the TV show that exposed it.
    btw there is an old saying in Russia, I you have only been to Moscow, St. Petersburg you haven't seen Russia at all.
     
  27. VIETgrlTerifa

    VIETgrlTerifa Well-Known Member

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    Was the show like this?

    WARNING NSFW and GRAPHIC
    http://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanhatesthis/russians-are-using-social-media-to-lure-in-and-publicly-humi

    These neo-Nazis also lump gays and pedophiles together. These attitudes are perpetuated by and inspired the anti-gay laws that Russia just passed. The law just adds more legitimacy to these violent actions (even if they are technically illegal) because like the law, these actions are specifically targeting people based solely on their sexual orientation.

    We keep talking about respecting other people's culture and it's true to an extent. However, it's not as if the IOC doesn't have a human rights charter that evolves with the way human rights narratives have evolved in Western Culture. Call it a Western bias if you will, but the modern Olympic games are a Western construct as is the idea of evolving human rights.

    Not to compare this to the Nazis at all because I won't go as far as to say Russia will do to gays what the Nazis did to the Jews, gays, Roma, and other minorities...but Germany didn't put their targeted groups into gas chambers until after the Olympics as well. They did put some of those groups in segregationist camps though, which Russia has NOT done. Before the 1936 Olympics, many Western countries said the high discrimination and relocation orders should not be a reason to relocate the games because politics should stay out of the Olympics. I'm sure if there were laws that targeted more privileged groups, there would not be any hesitation about relocation and boycotting. But then, it's such a money-making endeavor for many corporations...so maybe they would still turn a blind eye.
     
  28. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    There was discrimination going on in 1936 that directly affected athletes. Germany and several other countries also had qualification "standards" for the 1936 Olympics that made it very difficult for Jewish athletes to participate. E.g. Some sports federations in Germany banned Jews from belonging to local sport clubs, and athletes who did not belong to a local club were not eligible to compete at the national championships and thus could not qualify for the Olympics. But that sport-related reason - along with everything else - was not enough for the other countries to boycott the Games.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  29. love_skate2011

    love_skate2011 Well-Known Member

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    some graphics are affiliated to culture shock , I would bet this doesn't happen in the in the US or EU:
    note Russia has the second highest undocumented immigrants after the USA

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2381878/How-Russia-deals-illegal-immigrants.html
     
  30. VarBar

    VarBar Well-Known Member

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    I too would be interested to know why this law was necessary to begin with because the way I see it, the Russian gays belong to the same culture as the rest of the Russian population, they don't come from another galaxy. And if we were to refer to high culture, quite a few Russian writers and musicians were gay. So what cultural needs does this new piece of legislation fulfill? I'd also like to know if the Russian gays feel safe and comfortable in their own country now or if they fear persecution.
     
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