Retrospective: The 1992 World Championships

Discussion in 'The Trash Can' started by Maofan7, Apr 16, 2013.

  1. Maofan7

    Maofan7 pacem dare occasionem

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    Retrospective moves onto the 1992 World Championships.

    The key facts in relation to these championships are:-

    • Having just won the Olympic title, Viktor Petrenko wins his first and only World title. He won the title with a free skate which earned him 2 6.0's for Artistic Impression. Nevertheless, he doubled out on 3 intended triples in his LP. Accordingly, a second 3A, his artistry, and an exuberant finish to the program were key to him closing out the win. He retired after these world championships. However, he made a comeback 2 years later to take part in the 1994 Olympics where he finished 4th.

    • Kurt Browning had finished 6th at the 1992 Olympics, having been hampered throughout the 1991/92 season with a back injury. Nevertheless, he put in an improved performance at these World Championships, finishing 2nd. He would go on to regain the world title in 1993, before finishing 5th at the 1994 Olympics

    • Like Viktor Petrenko, Kristi Yamaguchi followed up her Olympic win by winning the World title (her 2nd consecutive World title). With Midori Ito having retired after the 1992 Olympics, Yamaguchi won easily, winning both the SP and the LP. Her FS was also far more self assured in these championships than at the Olympics, with 6 triples, including a 3+3 combination (3Z+3T, 3Z, 3F, 3R, 3T). Her only mistake was a fall on her nemesis jump, the 3S. She earned 8 5.9's for Artistic Impression.

    • Chen Lu makes the podium at Worlds for the first time, winning the Bronze medal. It was the first ever medal at a World championships by a Chinese skater. Moreover, many had felt that she had been under-marked at the 1991 World Championships and 1992 Olympics, and was finally getting just reward for her performances with this medal. With her combination of technical ability and great artistry, she would go on to win the world title in 1995, and take Bronze medals at the 1994 and 1998 Olympics.

    • Natalia Mishkutenok & Artur Dmitriev win their 2nd consecutive World title. They would retire after these Championships, but like Petrenko they would return to compete at the 1994 Olympics in which they would finish 2nd to Gordeeva & Grinkov. They won these World Championships in style with a brilliant performance in the FS with their Liebestraum program, which earned them 4 6.0's and 5 5.9's for Artistic Impression. The final death spiral of the program was quite simply sublime.

    • Radka Kovaříková & René Novotný make the podium at Worlds for the first time, winning the Silver medal. They would go on to win the World title in 1995 before retiring after those championships.

    • Marina Klimova & Sergei Ponomarenko, in their final competition after more than a decade in eligible skating, win their 3rd and final World title. Their main rivals during the previous few season, the Duchesnay's had retired after the 1992 Olympics. Accordingly, Klimova & Ponomarenko won these championships easily. Their FD, their final ever performance, was stunning, earning 9 5.9's for Artistic Impression.

    • Oksana Grishuk & Evgeni Platov make the podium for the first time at Worlds, winning a Bronze medal. They would go on to dominate Ice Dancing during the 1990's, winning 4 World titles and 2 Olympic titles.

    Here are the videos for the medal winning performances:-

    MEN'S

    Gold: Viktor Petrenko (CIS)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    Silver: Kurt Browning (Canada)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    Bronze: Elvis Stojko (Canada)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    4th: Christopher Bowman (USA)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    5th: Mark Mitchell (USA)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    6th: Petr Barna (Czechoslovakia)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    7th: Todd Eldredge (USA)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    8th: Alexei Urmanov (CIS)

    Short Program,

    10th: Viacheslav Zagorodniuk (CIS)

    Free Skate

    11th: Cornel Gheorghe (Romania)

    Free Skate

    13th: Michael Slipchuk (Canada)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    16th: Steven Cousins (GBR)

    Free Skate



    LADIES

    Gold: Kristi Yamaguchi (USA)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    Silver: Nancy Kerrigan (USA)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    Bronze: Chen Lu (China)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    4th: Laetitia Hubert (France)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    5th: Josée Chouinard (Canada)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    6th: Tonya Harding (USA)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    7th: Alice Sue Claeys (Belgium)

    Free Skate

    8th: Yuka Sato (Japan)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    9th: Karen Preston (Canada)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    10th: Patricia Neske (Germany)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    11th: Surya Bonaly (France)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    12th: Marina Kielmann (Germany)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    14th: Joanne Conway (GBR)

    Short Program

    15th: Charlene von Saher (GBR)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    16th: Nathalie Krieg (Switzerland)

    Short Program, Free Skate

    17th: Krisztina Czakó (Hungary)

    Free Skate

    20th: Anisette Torp-Lind (Denmark)

    Short Program, Free Skate



    PAIRS

    Gold: Natalia Mishkutenok & Artur Dmitriev (CIS)

    Short Program, Long Program

    Silver: Radka Kovaříková & René Novotný (Czechoslovakia)

    Short Program, Long Program

    Bronze: Isabelle Brasseur & Lloyd Eisler (Canada)

    Short Program, Long Program

    5th: Evgenia Shishkova & Vadim Naumov (CIS)

    Short Program, Long Program

    7th: Calla Urbanski Rocky Marval (USA)

    Short Program

    8th: Natasha Kuchiki & Todd Sand (USA)

    Short Program

    9th: Christine Hough & Doug Ladret (Canada)

    Short Program, Long Program

    10th: Sherry Ball & Kris Wirtz (Canada)

    Short Program, Long Program



    ICE DANCE

    Gold: Marina Klimova & Sergei Ponomarenko (CIS)

    CD1, CD2, OSP, Free Dance, Exhibition

    Silver: Maya Usova & Alexander Zhulin (CIS)

    CD1, CD2, OSP, Free Dance

    Bronze Oksana Grishuk & Evgeni Platov (CIS)

    CD1, CD2, OSP, Free Dance

    4th: Stefania Calegari & Pasquale Camerlengo (Italy)

    OSP, Free Dance

    5th: Susanna Rahkamo & Petri Kokko (Finland)

    OSP, Free Dance

    6th: Sophie Moniotte & Pascal Lavanchy (France)

    OSP, Free Dance

    7th: Dominique Yvon & Frédéric Palluel (France)

    OSP, Free Dance

    9th: April Sargent-Thomas & Russ Witherby (USA)

    Free Dance

    10th: Aliki Stergiadu & Juris Razgulaevs (Latvia)

    Free Dance

    12th: Jacqueline Petr & Mark Janoschak (Canada)

    CD1, CD2, Free Dance

    16th: Penny Mann & Juan Carlos Noria (Canada)

    CD1, CD2, Free Dance

    Now that the off-season is upon us, the next Retrospective in the series will come in September with the start of the new season: the 1993 World Championships

    By way of recap, this is the 27th Retrospective of the series. Here are links to the previous instalments:-

    1956 Olympics, 1960 Olympics, 1961 U.S. Figure Skating Team, 1964 Olympics, 1968 Olympics, 1968 World Championships, 1972 Olympics, 1976 Olympics, 1978 World Championships, 1979 World Championships, 1980 Olympics, 1980 World Championships, 1981 World Championships, 1982 World Championships, 1983 World Championships, 1984 Olympics, 1984 World Championships, 1985 World Championships, 1986 World Championships, 1987 World Championships, 1988 Olympics, 1988 World Championships, 1989 World Championships, 1990 World Championships, 1991 World Championships, 1992 Olympics
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  2. caseyedwards

    caseyedwards Well-Known Member

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    That second triple axel really saved Petrenko! It was looking so unlikely that he would win worlds until then.

    How about those ads for Cutting Edge and the one with Dorothy Hamill!
  3. gk_891

    gk_891 Active Member

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    I remember the free dance was strange as both Usova & Zhulin and Grishuk & Platov had very awkward falls. But medaling anyways was never in doubt as they were so far ahead of the rest of the field. Nice to see Klimova & Ponomarenko cap of their amateur career recapturing their world title that they had lost a year ago.

    I also remember the medal ceremony as well. Oksana and Evgeni were laughing and chatting with Marina and Sergei quite a bit while on the podium but not with Usova & Zhulin. I wonder if there was awkwardness between K/P and U/Z after what went down in 1991 with Dubova. I remember things were quite frigid and cold between U/Z and G/P on the podium at various 93 and 94 competitions after Alexander's relationship with Oksana in 92.
  4. judgejudy27

    judgejudy27 Well-Known Member

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    What annoyed me though is the CBC team (and possibly correctly based on the marks) implied that even had G&P skated well as expected, and not fallen themselves, that Usova & Zhulin were sitll guaranteed the silver. To me that would be unfair if it happened that way. U&Z at that point were not THAT much better than G&P to merit beating them with a fall had G&P not fallen.
  5. gk_891

    gk_891 Active Member

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    The cbc team loved loved love U&Z so much they thought they were the best team in the world. I remember Barbara mentioned at the 92 Olympics that she thought they had the best blues CD even though Usova very clearly did a back inside edge during the chocktaw rather than the required back outside edge - shows to me they don't really know all that much about ice dance. And I actually preferred both the OD and FD of G&P that year over U&Z. It had far superior content. But apparently Barbara thought if U&Z had not fallen, they probably would've/could've upset K&P for the gold (which IMO is ridiculous).
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  6. Maofan7

    Maofan7 pacem dare occasionem

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    alilou and (deleted member) like this.
  7. A.H.Black

    A.H.Black Well-Known Member

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    I attended Worlds in 1992. My biggest complaint was there should have been a way for Paul Wylie to attend. Even his family was there (we saw them), but Paul wasn't. I know about the decision after Nationals concerning Mark Mitchell and Paul. I had no problem with that decision and was happy to see Mark at Worlds. I always thought Todd Eldredge should have pulled out of Worlds - his back was still not completely right. Then Paul would have been able to attend and compete.

    I know it was not in Todd's nature to give up a spot at a competition. I just wish it could have happened. I remember watching Todd at National's practice when his coach was insisting he pull out there. Todd was visibly upset and so was Richard. Todd was obviously in trouble physically, but kept trying to keep going. It was a very tense conversation that went on for about half an hour at the boards. The result was Todd withdrawing and petitioning to make the Olympic Team. He was granted a place on the team, provided he was in good enough shape to compete. He performed his program for officials, was pronounced fit and so went to the Olympics. However, even though he was able to compete, I never thought he looked 100% for the rest of the year. This is what my memory is anyway.

    Just a couple of aside notes - The Oakland arena was in a marginal part of town. We rode the rapid transit to and from where we stayed. After one of the competitions I was ready to get on the train and discovered I had left my purse/bag behind. My friend and I walked all the way back to see if I could find it. The janitorial crew was in full force and I was very scared my bag would be gone. Security asked us what we were doing and let us pass. I remember hearing them talk about us on their walky talkies. Lo and behold, there it was - right under my seat where I left it. Yeah for the Oakland arena and staff. We never had any trouble there and enjoyed the stay.

    I also remember that a couple of the men's restrooms were converted into Women's restrooms for this event (given so much of the crowd was women). We walked into the Women's room and there were urinals there. I stopped dead in my tracks, turned around and walked out, and looked at the sign again. I saw tons of women do exactly the same thing. We got so when someone walked in and stopped (as they saw the urinals), we all said "It's OK. We did the same thing." Lots of laughs in the bathrooms.
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2013
  8. wristflick

    wristflick New Member

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    Barb was very pro U&Z and also anti K&P. She even implied the Duchensays had a better second CD and OD than K&P at the Olympics. You are right Barb & Paul really give the impression of knowing nothing about ice dancing, and their excessive whining about B&K's marks prove this. They really should have brought in a specialist just for dance while they were the CBC team. They did a decent job in the other 3 disciplines, and obviously nobody could question their pairs knowledge.
  9. Maofan7

    Maofan7 pacem dare occasionem

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  10. Jun Y

    Jun Y Well-Known Member

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    Looking at the ladies' free skates, I am struck by all the difficult content in Yamaguchi's program. It was transitions galore! Most of her triples had difficult connecting steps with great variety too. Technically she can certainly compete with the best skaters today (except the obvious flutz), and I don't think today's top ladies' programs (and most men's programs) have so many and such diverse transitions.

    Unfortunately the commentators back then never ever talked about the difficult transitions and only counted how many triples each skater landed, giving the casual viewer (which I was then) the impression that technical degree is all in counting triples.
  11. Susan M

    Susan M Well-Known Member

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    92 Worlds is the last of the post-Olympic Worlds where pretty much all the medalists showed up. I think the Duchesneys and Midori Ito pulled out (plus of course Wylie was not there because USFS had not put him on the World team). So it became a kind of coronation for the 4 OGMs.

    Things I remember from watching it on TV -

    Oakland Arena has undersized ice (not even NHL standard, let alone Olympic size) and I seem to recall that affected a number of the skaters.

    Mishkutenok & Dmitriev skated a technically stronger program than at the Olympics, but it felt less magical. I think the 6.0s were kind of a farewell gift. Perhaps the judges were finally giving them the 6.0 marks that they should have been given at 91 Worlds. Also there was some controversy in Albertville that Kovarakovny & Novotny should have gotten the bronze medal there over the Canadians, so I think the judges were afraid to engage in their usual shenanigans and dump the off the podium again at Worlds.

    92 Olympics and Worlds came right after the Soviet Union broke up, but they still competed as one team, but under a different flag with a different anthem. After they swept the podium in dance, when they skated their victory lap, the US broadcaster dubbed in the old Soviet anthem for old times sake. (They said the other one just felt wrong.) I thought it was kind of a nice touch.
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2013
  12. Maofan7

    Maofan7 pacem dare occasionem

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  13. Maofan7

    Maofan7 pacem dare occasionem

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    Completely agree. Kristi, like Midori, was well ahead of her time.
  14. VIETgrlTerifa

    VIETgrlTerifa Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I remember being taken aback about how full Yamaguchi's routines were of transitions. I'm not the biggest Yamaguchi fan, but man did she have difficult routines.
  15. Maofan7

    Maofan7 pacem dare occasionem

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    Her only real weakness was with her nemesis jump, the 3S. She personally found it harder than a triple lutz.
  16. caseyedwards

    caseyedwards Well-Known Member

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    They talked about moves named transitions now more as part of artistry. Basically you are right but when people did the Russian splits and or three turns or spread eagles or whatever you could totally tell they were talking about artistry. Like with goe now in cop IJS they are all transitions for goe in the tech mark as well as a pretty strong implication that they also invoke artistry and now are in the pcs mark as tr!
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2013
  17. floskate

    floskate Vacant

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    I was devastated when I tuned in to the BBC's coverage when they announced right of the bat that Midori Ito had withdrawn. I was such an Ito uber and back in 1992, with no internet and limited to no skating on my TV, I honestly thought I would never see her again. I think I cried actually. :lol: Anyway it's all turned out ok in the end. In hindsight it's better she withdrew. If the ice really wasn't even NHL size then she could have caused herself and the audience some serious injury!!

    I wasn't much of a fan of Yamaguchi's 92 freeskate. I thought her S&D '91 program had much more choreographic depth to it. I was surprised it was Bezic's work actually because I'm normally a HUGE fan of her choreography - maybe it was the overdone music? I just found it to be a little trite and predictable, although ITA about transitions. Her salchow was just a trainwreck though and that LFO three-turn was always so snatched and swingy, you just knew she was doomed most of the time. She never stepped up into the jump and just whipped into it hoping for the best with the exact opposite usually happening. I always thought she should have done the sal out of steps leading into a back three to mohawk set up. That would perhaps have helped to take the snatch out of the take off.
  18. VIETgrlTerifa

    VIETgrlTerifa Well-Known Member

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    I never found any of Yamaguchi's amateur programs to have real depth to them. She has great transitions and moves on the beat, but I always felt her skating was superficial. Of course, others think it's versatility and applaud her for that.
    Dr.Siouxs and (deleted member) like this.
  19. briancoogaert

    briancoogaert Well-Known Member

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    Her Blue Danube is so light, so clean, so full of transitions, and her Malaguena is more powerfull, still full of little details and transitions. Really, none of her choreo was superficial, IMO. ;)
  20. Gabybackhand

    Gabybackhand Member

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    I was glad she WD since no way she was beating newly crowned Olympic Champ Kristi on basically her local rink ice no matter how well she skated. I wish she had made a comeback for the 93-94 seasons though. I dont know why she waited until 96 when she was too old for amateur competition, but 93-94 she could have been back on top.
  21. Gabybackhand

    Gabybackhand Member

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    Her Blue Danube was gorgeous and wonderful. I liked her LP, but I liked her 91 LP more.
  22. Maofan7

    Maofan7 pacem dare occasionem

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  23. Jessica

    Jessica Active Member

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    I remember reading years ago that Kristi starting having trouble with the 3S in singles when she started doing the throw 3S in pairs.
  24. pollyanna

    pollyanna Don't blink

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    I liked her 1992 programs, but I loved her 1991 programs even more, especially her 1991 original program, in part because it was music I had not heard before.
  25. Maofan7

    Maofan7 pacem dare occasionem

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    Did she say why that caused a problem?
  26. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    I would imagine that the timing is different for singles jumps, as opposed to pairs - especially for throws.
  27. Jessica

    Jessica Active Member

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    It's been so long ('91 or '92) that I really don't remember if she said why but I bet it's like skateindreams says--it's the timing.
  28. gordanlevitt

    gordanlevitt New Member

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    I remember this was the Worlds Usova & Zhulin challenged Marina Klimova again (I only say her since Sergei was her toy she dragged around the ice) but a fall in the FD cost them a chance of winning. It was funny how U&Z could challenge K&P at the 91 and 92 Worlds but not the 92 Olympics. I guess the judges already decided the 92 Olympics was just a Marina Klimova and Duchensay siblings showdown.
  29. lulu

    lulu New Member

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    Marina was a very striking woman and certainly had a great deal of presence on the ice, but I personally never got the impression of Sergei fading into the background or being overshadowed by Marina. For me at least, Klimova & Ponomarenko were one of the more evenly talented ice dance teams in history (at least, that's my impression).
  30. fenway2

    fenway2 Well-Known Member

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    Superficial question. Any Yamaguchi fans know why she returned to her original Malaguena costume? I think she only wore the gold and black costume once - at the Olympics.
  31. gk_891

    gk_891 Active Member

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    Not only that but Sergei Ponomarenko is one of the greatest technicians of all time. At first, he was significantly better than she was but as she developed, she began to match his level. i think he should go down as one of the greatest ice dancers of all time. I can't believe there are people out there that think she was 'dragging' him around.

    Even if U/Z hadn't fallen, they didn't deserve to come anywhere close to K/P. Not only were they not as technically proficient but their content didn't come anywhere close. Even a young and developing G/P had far superior content in their programs.
  32. lulu

    lulu New Member

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    To add to that, I'm re-watching K&P's 1987 Worlds FD and Scott Hamilton mentions that Sergei Ponomarenko is probably considered the best male ice dancer in the world.

    I'm not as proficient as I'd like to be WRT the technical side of ice dance, and I love G&P and their voidy FD that year, but for me, U&Z's Four Seasons free dance was simply sublime.
  33. VIETgrlTerifa

    VIETgrlTerifa Well-Known Member

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    Um...Sergei Ponomarenko is probably one of the best male ice dancers of all time, and K/P's choreography utilized both dancers (which was a welcome change after Bestemianova/Bukin).

    Maybe you're confusing Marina Klimova with Paul Duschenay who really used Isabelle as a prop in almost all of their choreography...or maybe even Sasha Zhulin who would literally drag Maya Usova in their their choreography. See 1991 Worlds FD.
  34. gk_891

    gk_891 Active Member

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    Yeah, Ponomarenko was the first male ice dancer to break out of the mould of just presenting the lady. Look at Alexei Gorshkov, Gennady Karponosov, Andrei Minenkov, Andre Bukin, etc and they basically were just props for their partners. Sergei was an extraordinarily strong skater and technician. Almost all the male skaters in Dubova's group were like Zhulin and Platov.
  35. duane

    duane New Member

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    And then, there would be a 5-year drought before a female champion would land a 3/3 in the FS.
  36. Susan M

    Susan M Well-Known Member

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    Yo, Christopher Dean, maybe?? I'm not saying Jayne was just a prop, but Chris was the one who riveted my attention.

    I loved U/Z because of their lines and elegance, but I agree. Nobody at the 92 Olympics or Worlds was in the same league as Klimova/Ponomarenko (not even the Duchesnays). There was such completeness to their free dance especially. I also agree about the technical difficulty of Usova-Zhulin vs Grishuk/Platov. I didn't notice it so much in 92 because of the presentation gap, but at 93 Worlds I remember being glad U/Z won because I loved that dance, but thinking that G/P's dance looked a lot more complex and difficult.
  37. gk_891

    gk_891 Active Member

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    Sorry, meant to say that Ponomarenko was the first Soviet male ice dancer. Forgot to mention the word Soviet.

    As steamy as U/Z's Blues FD was that year, that program was far too simple for my tastes in terms of the choreography. I definitely liked G/P's blues better (choreographed by the great Shanti Rushpaul who also did K/P's 92 FD). But they didn't help themselves with a lift that looked illegal to me (his arm was lifting Oksana above his shoulders) and at least one illegal separation. I still would've given them first though.
  38. judgejudy27

    judgejudy27 Well-Known Member

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    Apparently 6 judges were suspended for placing G&P as high as 2nd in the FD of the 93 Worlds. So for those who say the judges werent fussy about their programs that year, the ISU was even less so.
  39. gk_891

    gk_891 Active Member

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    Even with the illegalities, I still would've had G/P in first or second at the 93 worlds. I definitely would've had the Finns in 3rd. One team who I thought should've been higher was Navka & Gezalian. They were 9th but should've been top 5 IMHO.
  40. Nours

    Nours Active Member

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    That's true... for three months. I always hear this story as a fact even though it was only a political plot which didn't last long. I have the officials publications made by ISU from the IOC archives. It says six judges were indeed suspended : Liliana Strechova, Marie Lundmark, Eric Couste, Irina Nechkina, Ljudmila Mikhailovskaya, Eleanor Curtis. Demmy suspended them on the 12th of June after a meeting on the 10th with the technical commitee. The reason was at first their judging at 1993 World dance event. But their judging at Euros was in question too (it was almost the same panel). The IDTC lead by Kunz (and the referee at the 93 worlds dance event) also made a recommendation to the nationals associations the judges were from in order theses judges not to be sent at 1994 OG (and IMO, this was as big as a matter for them as the suspension was). All the judges suspended made an appeal and were outraged by the decision. Their meeting and hearings were held in Zurich from the 10th of september to the 12th. Except :

    "DECISION
    1. The Appeals made by Mrs Strechova, Mrs Lundmark, Mr Couste, Mrs Nechkina, Mrs Mikhailovskaya and Mrs Curtis are accepted.
    2. The decision of the I.S.U. Council from June 12th, 1993 regarding their suspension from November 1, 1993 till March 31, 1994, is cancelled.
    3. This decision is final immediatelly.
    4. All sanctions taken in consequence of theses suspensions should be recinded.

    From the abund nt record in these appeals, the AC has identified the following importants events and facts : [...]
    2. An event review meeting was conducted by the Referee, Mr Kutschera and the Assistant Referee, Mr Kunz, (Rules 335 and 340, para 5). The individual judges marks were not questioned at this meeting. Because there were no questions, the individual judges were not required to explain any supposed deviations on their cards as foreseen in the rules. General remarks were made to the whole panel regarding some overmarked and some undermarked couples, especially from overseas. Further comments were made for the future improvement of the Ice Dancing. No explanation sheets were given to the judges regarding the top five skating couples. No criticism was expressed concerning the final result.
    3. The Referee did not ask any of the appellants for a written explanation within one month after the event. (Rule 345, para.3).
    4. In the Referees Report (Rule 345) all the appellants were rated only "fair" in all parts of the event (except Strechova, for Original Dance only, was rated "good") on the Judging Report form."Fair" is the category above "poor" and below "good" on this form.
    No copies of the Judging Report were sent to any of the appellants (Rule 345, para.5b) even though they were all assessed by the Referee to be in the category closest to "poor", that is "fair", which appears to be comparable to "mediocre" according to the Regulations.
    5. The Judging Report refers to some "striking differences" in the placing of each judge (except Strechova for OD). Other paper in the same report, i.e. classification lists, do not show any "striking differences". No witness, including Mr Kunz, could identify any "striking differences".
    [...]
    7. The Minutes of the IDTC meeting at Wurtzburg (prepared by C. Jones and confirmed to the AC as correct by W.Kunz) contain the following important text :
    "Mr. Felli, of the International Olympic Committee, has expressed the concern of the I.O.C. that the Free Dance programmes are very much show-oriented and that the protocol rarely changes throughout the event. The Committee discussed this at length and noted the concern raised.
    In view of the above the Committee recommended that drastic action be taken and it was decided, unanimously, to recommend to the Council that the following actions be taken :
    THAT the following six judges should not officiate at the forthcoming Olympic Games because of their placings for Gritschuk-Platov and Rahkamo-Kokko throughout the event. If agreed by the Council the a Press Release should be issued regarding the matter as well as appearing in a Circular Letter from the ISU office" (Underlining added)"

    Follows a lot of considerations about the violations made in order to suspend the judges by the IDTC and how it was impossible for them to suspend the judges only for one event (1994 OG). Only one major fact stands out : "This is shown by the suspension of L. Strechova who, to Mr Kunz surprise, recorded placings of 2,2,4 and 2 for the couple G-P. Mr Kunz thinks the inclusion of L. Strechova must be a mistake."
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013