Retrospective: The 1990 World Championships

Discussion in 'The Trash Can' started by Maofan7, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. Maofan7

    Maofan7 Away

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    She retired after finishing 6th at 1991 U.S. Nationals. Qualifying for major championships was always going to be tough at this juncture. Although Jill Trenary was injured at that stage, she had not yet retired (that would come in December 1991). And then there was the emergence of Tonya Harding, Nancy Kerrigan, Tonia Kwiatkowski, and Nicole Bobek, as well as the continued progress of Kristi Yamaguchi.

    This was the result from 1991 U.S. Nationals:-

    1. Tonya Harding
    2. Kristi Yamaguchi
    3. Nancy Kerrigan
    4. Tonia Kwiatkowski
    5. Tisha Walker
    6. Holly Cook
    7. Kyoko Ina
    8. Nicole Bobek
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
  2. Seerek

    Seerek Well-Known Member

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    That was one of the rare instances where a skater in her first worlds actually got rewarded with a high placement in figures (same with Lisa Sargeant, who placed 7th in figures). Everyone else who placed high in the figures segment were already in their 4th or 5th Worlds appearance.
     
  3. TheIronLady

    TheIronLady New Member

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    Holly Cook is one of the most down home, what you see is what you get people I have ever encountered. I regret that skating has not as much room for people with her sort of personality today. Well it does, but they seem to be encouraged to not showcase their ordinariness or folksy eccentricity-- either off or on the ice.
     
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  4. TheIronLady

    TheIronLady New Member

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    Who is this Tisha Walker, and what became of her?
     
  5. Maofan7

    Maofan7 Away

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    Accordingly to this article, she now coaches in California (Simi Valley). Same article states that Holly Cook "is married with one child. She lives in Utah where she also works as a coach" (at the South Davis Recreation Center in Bountiful, Utah). She is now known as Holly Cook-Tanner

    Here also is a 1989 article on Tisha Walker and here is Tisha Walker's Free Skate from 1991 U.S. Nationals. She finished 6th at U.S. Nationals in 1992 and 8th in 1993, before retiring
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2013
  6. ioana

    ioana Well-Known Member

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    Whoa, she looks and skates a lot like Anita Madsen. Maybe they had the same coach early on in their careers? Interesting...
     
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  7. stanhope

    stanhope Active Member

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    Shishkova and Naumov beg to differ.

    I would have loved it if G&G had competed at '94 Worlds. I think they just should have gone and enjoyed it. The pressure was off, they already got Olympic gold for the second time! But I imagine they wanted to stop training and be with their daughter.
     
  8. Maofan7

    Maofan7 Away

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    Ha! Wonder what I was thinking. Oh, the fogs of time

    Thanks for correcting
     
  9. Maofan7

    Maofan7 Away

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    I was delighted to see the back of compulsory figures. I thought they should have been phased out a very long time beforehand. Thanks to compulsories, many of the most talented skaters in history ended up winning far less than they deserved - Janet Lynn, Toller Cranston, Denise Biellmann, etc

    Here is a video featuring the very last school figures ever skated!

    Additional Videos

    Ladies Medal Cermony

    Men's Medal Ceremony

    Profile - Lisa Sargeant

    Free Dance - Final Group
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2013
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  10. Maximillian

    Maximillian Well-Known Member

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    This complaint never ceases to frustrate me. Being skilled in compulsory figures was just as valid a skill as being skilled at freeskating, that's why it was included in the competition (not as some people seem to suggest to frustrate and prohibit talented freeskaters from winning world titles), and why it used to count for 60% of the score. The skill-set required for success at school figures was a different one than that which was required in being a successful freeskater; however, just because those skills aren't as appealing to a mass audience should not diminish the achievements and the aptitude of those who managed to skate figures well. Figures skating as a competitive sport predates television by a half a century and what was valued in terms of the sport through that half century was different than what it became. The sport is now very much a product of television and all the financial concerns and interests which accompany that relationship , but that doesn't mean the sport is a better sport now just because it appeals to a mass audience. Just because figures were not appealing to a television audience is not a reason to dismiss their validity or the merit of those who skated them well.
     
  11. TheIronLady

    TheIronLady New Member

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    Perhaps the figures could have operated better under a scoring system like IJS. The figures had a distorting effect on results scored under factored placements and ordinals. One bad ordinal factored in and you were dead in the water. The figures had another undesirable way of influencing results. With the more subjective 6.0 majority panel system, the order in which you skated in the SP & FS was somewhat more important than it is under under IJS. Figures placements determined what group you skated in for the SP (and thus indirectly the FS). This gave distorted influence to figures ordinals (even when they were reduced to only 30% or 20%). A skater under 6.0 might win the SP and not be high enough overall to skate in the final flight. This typically appeared to influence how high the judges were willing to rank someone in the FS (the old cliche about leaving room under 6.0 for later skaters seemed to apply in those days). So the case could be made that under a different judging system like IJS figures as 20% could have been been less problematic.

    As Maximillian points out, the reason figures could never have survived is that they were incompatible with television and ticket sales, and the sport was constantly evolving into an entertainment business. This is perhaps supported by the eventual dumping of the compulsory dances. Like figures, they made for weak television and sales, and thus were not self-funding.

    Another, perhaps deadly factor, was the money required to pay for ice time to practice figures. In countries with limited facilities, training figures was more cost prohibitive.

    I think one reason why few shed tears for the end of compulsory figures (besides that they weren't fun to watch and skaters hated practicing them) was that audiences felt they could scrutinize every ordinal in the SP and FS. They could engage with the free skate judging. Audiences could not do this with compulsory figures. Now under IJS, things have changed so much that viewers might object less to being told by experts whose figures are better without themselves, as knowledgeable observers, knowing why. A good amount of scoring by the technical panel is either a bore or a slight mystery to even informed audiences today. It has to be revealed in slow motion. So I believe figures might be tolerated better under IJS than they were in the heyday of skating's Western popularity under 6.0.

    Alas, this is not a realistic what if. Figures could not have survived without some unique will on the part of the skating community. There were no incentives to hold them in an increasingly globalized and business-oriented sport.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2013
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