Recreational dance for adults (esp. ballet) -- where to start? What to look for?

Discussion in 'Other Sports' started by Bunny_Hop, Mar 10, 2013.

  1. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    As much as I love skating, I don't think it's going to be accessible to me for at least a couple of years. In short, my rink (already a long journey) is going through some issues. I'm facing a 4-5hr return journey to the next closest rink, at least temporarily, right when my personal schedule has made the regular 3hr return difficult to do even once a week.

    On that note, I decided to look into options for "similar" sports, in terms of the stuff I like: rhythm and music and the acquisition of different elements. I considered roller-figure skating, but travel is still an issue and I don't really like rollerskating/inline. I think the way to go is ballet, though I'm open to other suggestions. I haven't done dance since I was a tot (3-5 years old).

    Basically, the features of my situation:
    - I got to about Freestyle 1 level in skating. Solid waltz jump, working on salchow and toe loop, a bit further behind on spins.
    - I am not very flexible and have a muscle condition that makes me prone to injury from overzealous stretching. It's not impossible to increase my flexibility but it has to be done slowly. I did once get to the point where I could almost go from touching-toes to hands-flat-on-ground.
    - There seem to be various options nearby for kids/teen ballet but, although I'm in my late teens, I think with the flexibility issue I'd be more suited to an adult beginner class.
    - I don't really want to do a "concert at the end of the year"-type class, though this isn't necessarily a deciding factor.

    Does anyone know what kind of things I should look for in a class description/class type? Any other advice? I thought this was the kind of thing that might be offered on a drop-in or eight-week-class sort of basis at the gym, but it doesn't seem to be. All the classes are more focussed on attaining a body shape rather than acquiring aesthetic/athletic skills. Are adult beginner ballerinas really so rare? :(
     
  2. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    I've found most adult ballet classes do have drop in class cards (generally at a higher rate than if you pay for the semester). I've danced at 7 studios in 3 different states.

    If you are looking at classes at the gym, they will be fitness based. You need to look at dance studios, or possibly community centers (but that is more likely to be exercise based).
    This forum: http://dancers.invisionzone.com/ may be able to help you locate a class, if you tell them where you live. It is a very helpful ballet forum. Many dance studios also have adult jazz or tap classes.

    A good ballet class will NOT use class time for an end of the year recital. Separate rehearsal time should be used. Most adult classes don't have a recital component though.

    If you want serious dance instruction, even at a low level- consider dancing with kids, even if it means you are with kids much younger than you (I started ballet at 22 and danced with 7-8 year olds). The adult classes often are more social in nature, and some time is lost to that.
    (Oh sorry, just re-read, I see you are a late teen. Many studios "adult beginner" is anything over 14, because at 14 the kids will be advanced.) Most places will allow a trial class- just call and ask.
     
  3. danceronice

    danceronice Corgi Wrangler

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    You could also look into ballroom/latin/lindy 'partner' dancing (most run on private lessons and group classes, neither of which require partners.) The plus there is you don't HAVE to be super-flexible (I'm not, at all), and some styles, ESPECIALLY Lindy, are basically an aerobic workout. Much like you don't need to do a recital in an adult ballet class, you don't have to compete if you don't want to.

    Our studio also offers some other classes (adult ballet, and they MEAN adults, Zumba, hip-hop.) You might also look at community centers for classes--ballet classes given there tend to be aimed at genuine beginners/non-traditional students, so they might feel more comfortable.
     
  4. my little pony

    my little pony snarking for AZE

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    sometimes i take a barre class at a ballet studio near me. it's for adults. it's great exercise. no recital.
     
  5. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    agree about looking at dance studios, not gyms. but I would disagree about taking class with little kids if you are an adult or close to one. Adult beginning is very, very different from child beginning, because beginning classes for children are also structured to deal with developing minds, not just bodies. Adult minds learn movement differently.

    If flexibility is really an issue for you, you may want to start (or complement) with modern or, as danceronice says, some sort of ballroom/partner dance. Some parts of ballet can be frustrating for the very inflexible.

    My suggestions:
    - look for a studio that focuses on adults, not children. The quality of adult classes will be higher if that's their main thing.
    - you do not need to buy ballet shoes. I don't recommend any adult invest that kind of $$ unless they've tried a few classes and decided ballet is something they like. avoid studios that require ballet slippers for beginners.
    - if you find a studio that offers different styles, see if there are any intro packages where you can try a few types of classes. Some studios will have a "dance day" before the beginning of a session where people can try short versions of all the classes for a low cost. Even if this is the case, try out different styles/teachers.
    - don't be afraid to ask questions! call or email studios to explain what you're looking for - if they don't have it, they should be able to point you in the right direction
    - have fun! :)
     
  6. DustPuppyOI

    DustPuppyOI Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely focus on adult classes at dance studios if they are available - the easier/lower the level the better if you're just starting. I'm spoiled in New York since several school have absolute beginner classes (pretty much never owned ballet slippers before and never touched barre before) and I've seen it similarly things in Toronto as well (especially after SYTYCD started). After getting your feet wet, you can start taking more advanced classes. These kinds of introductory classes are most helpful just because they tell you all the basic terminology, body positions, and actually allow you to slowly try the steps. If you can, ask the school whether you can watch the classes to see whether the level is suitable for you. If there aren't that many adult ballet class options and if you're brave enough, you might want to join a kids class but stop when they start preparations of recitals/concerts.

    If ballet isn't that prevalent though, you may want to consider other dance styles like jazz or modern/contemporary. They should at least have some ballet in their warm ups and such. There's no music but you may want try things like pilates, gyrotonics, or yoga. Are there gyms with acrobatics or circus arts? Those might fun too.

    Would you mind letting us know your general geography?
     
  7. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    I think it depends how 'beginning' she is. If she has skated, it is possible she will go through the 'intro to ballet' stage very quickly. There are some adults who need to have the intro class of "this is first position, this is a tendu, etc" as a semester and that, I agree, is better to take with adults- because kids at this level will lack attention span and need to be taught in a very different manner from adults who are very analytical at this stage. But I know I pretty much did all that in a single class, due to similar but non ballet experience, and then the adult class became tedious because we repeated the same basic information so many times, and frustrating because many adults used the class as a social time. Once kids are 7 or 8 (often "Ballet III", but not always) they should have a very disciplined class that is very structured, and I find it to be a much better way to actually learn ballet. Adult classes often lack structure and logical progression, because they aren't designed to be -training- for a dancer.
     
  8. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    Thanks Skittl1321, danceronice, mylittlepony, genevieve and DustPuppyOI for your detailed replies!

    I don't think I made it quite clear about the gym: I'd be happy doing ballet at a gym, at least to start, and was considering joining a large gym, thinking surely there'd be some sort of class. However, they don't have any dance except for one reference to Zumba which was outside the regular schedule.

    I'll continue looking around for a dance studio; there seem to be several around here, and will look for the things you outlined.

    I really appreciated that you took the time to make such detailed replies. Obviously I was upset about the rink's (kinda) closure but I'm starting to get pretty excited about ballet! :)
     
  9. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    If your gym offers Les Mills classes- look for Sh'Bam and BodyJam on the schedule. Those give me my dance fix. Very fun. (I don't care for zumba...)
     
  10. PDilemma

    PDilemma Well-Known Member

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    I have done adult ballet classes at a couple of studios. My advice is to ask a lot of questions about how they teach. After a year of beginning classes at one studio, I switched to another and used a drop in/class card to take the second half of an adult ballet I class. No problems with that. For the studio's summer session, adult ballet II was recommended to me as ballet I would start with "this is first position" and so on. That was a disaster. Basically, everyone else in the class had danced for their entire childhoods and the teacher ran it like an advanced course--standing in the corner barking out combinations half of the steps being stuff I didn't recognize or had not learned. She chewed me out for not being able to do a double pirouette one night and that is the last time I went. I was told that "in a show, only making it one and half turns will get you kicked out". My answer: "I am almost 40 years old and signed up for fun and fitness. Anyone dumb enough to cast me in a show deserves me not being able to do their choreography".
     
  11. ballettmaus

    ballettmaus Well-Known Member

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    I have no idea about the states, but in Germany, I know that, if they even offer ballet classes at a gym, the instructor usually doesn't have a dance background but a fitness background. So basically, they have no idea what they're talking about when they teach ballet. But like I said, that might be different in the states, since I assume you are in the states.
    If you're in an urbanite area, then you should have dance schools around which offer kid/teen classes and adult classes. In a less urbanite area that might be more difficult to find.

    I agree with genevieve, I definitely would not start in a kid beginner class because kids who starts at age 4-6 should not be starting out at the barre. They should be starting out at the center, with games and stretching instead of a rigid class. If they don't, I'd give the school a second thought.

    Since you mentioned music and rhythm you might want to look into something others have suggested though, jazz, modern, Zumba etc. Because, a ballet class that is just a class usually doesn't consist much of "dancing". A beginner class might even be 45 minutes barre, 15 minutes in the center with just a couple of excercises in the center. So no step combinations through the room. Jazz, modern etc classes usually have a combination at the end of class, so you get to dance/move a lot more than in a ballet class. If you're in your late teens that might be more fun!

    In regards to ballet, some schools might offer a 10 class beginner workshop or whatever. They have a fixed starting date and a room full of beginners. Then, once the 10 classes are completed, you have a basic knowledge of ballet and can take beginner classes that go year around without feeling lost as to what the terminology means or what the teacher wants from you.
     
  12. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    This has been my experience too. I would recommend checking out a dance school, or a community centre that has a strong dance program (not just ballet) - usually community centres IME are very careful about hiring good instructors if dance is a big part of their programming.
     
  13. Angelskates

    Angelskates Well-Known Member

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    Bunny Hop, do you have anything like this is your area? I take classes here whenever I am home and love them.

    ETA: Sorry Bunny_Hop, I thought you were Bunny Hop :lol:
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2013
  14. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    Progress update!

    Firstly, thanks for the replies Skittl1321, PDilemma, Balletmaus, overedge and AngelSkates. :) I will definitely look into it. So, Ballet I is where you learn the terminology/basic stuff? I'm glad about that; I thought it was like grade one and you were supposed to do "kindergarten" first! :p

    I've started looking into ballet schools in the area and looks like I'm spoilt for choice! Currently I've emailed two in the area. One I like because it offers classes on a drop-in basis, the other because it has a specific recreational "stream" which I think might have attracted some other adults/late starters like me (it doesn't specify payment structure; if it also has casual payment option I will most likely go there). I just asked if they take adult/late teen students.
     
  15. DustPuppyOI

    DustPuppyOI Well-Known Member

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    Ballet I varies from school to school. I've seen places where there's Beginner/Intermediate/Advanced and other places with Absolute Beginner/Beginner/Advanced Beginner/Intermediate/Intermediate Advanced/Advanced. Some places do have descriptions to clarify by indicating ___ number of years of dance experience. I've also had experience where the teacher practically ignores the level and caters to whoever shows up.

    If you can, do try and see if you can watch a class. If your area has live pianists (instead of recordings), those can make or break a class too.

    Glad to see you're making progress!
     
  16. ballettmaus

    ballettmaus Well-Known Member

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    I'd prefer a pianist over recording any day! However, I don't think that it makes much of a difference in a beginner class since it should be pretty basic. Once you've taken class with a pianist though, you'll have a hard time going back to a class with recordings. I certainly did!
     
  17. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    Update: still having some difficulty finding a place that takes adult beginners. But there are so many places around. There's also a dance school just for adults with other dance styles which says it's going to expand to ballet, but the website hasn't been updated since 2011 so I don't know what's going on there... Could give them a call I suppose!
     
  18. smileyskate

    smileyskate New Member

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    If you interested in ballroom, just check the (good old fashioned) phone book (or even the 'net but not all are listed sometimes) for the dance studios. They may even have discounts if you buy a small package and the pro will dance with you. Some even have small adult groups with no partner required. I would also call, rather than just email those ballet dance studios if they haven't gotten right back with you as many are not that interested in beginner adults unless maybe you want private lessons. Perhaps a friend would go and you could split the cost of the teacher if there is no class available for you at the times you can make it.
     
  19. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    Hey everyone! I'm so excited! The dance school I mentioned in my previous post has updated their website, and they weren't joking about starting ballet classes there! I'm so excited! Did I already say that? The term starts next week.

    Thanks for the idea smileyskate!

    Now, onto practical matters: what do I wear?! :O
     
  20. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    You can't go wrong with leotard and pink tights, but most adults don't wear this. My current adult ballet class 90% of the class wears a leotard, cropped yoga pants, and ballet shoes. We get a few people in t-shirts and sweat pants, and a few people in ankle socks. A few people will wear black leotard + pink tights, but also generally wear a skirt. I like to wear a skirt, personally. Oddly, it is the dancers on the extremes of the spectrum who wear socks- the absolute beginners without shoes, and the awesome just out of high school dancers- it's apparently a thing.

    I've never been in a ballet school that has a uniform for adults, but some do require ballet slippers.
     
  21. Lainerb

    Lainerb New Member

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    Hello,

    I am interested in starting ballet as an adult as well. I am 29(!) and male and am wondering about how much I can really gain yet as far as flexibility and technique is concerned. I am a little insecure about starting, but while I am visiting family in Portland I have read on a few websites that there are ballet/dance schools which offer beginner adult ballet classes. I've done yoga for a bit less than a year and have both of my front splits, but am no where near having a desirable middle split. Are middle splits required for ballet positions at all? Also, I am concerned about developing good turn out. Is it possible to gain good turn out technique at my age or do you have to start when young when your ligaments and tendons are still more pliable? I suppose I have nothing to lose by trying but it's a bit intimidating.
     
  22. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    Middle splits are definetly not required for ballet. In fact, most ballet teachers will say the splits are a stretch in themselves, not a position to be gained. (Though in professional ballet uber-flexibility is becoming way more prized so this is a difficult position to really agree with.)

    I recommend the board dancers.invisionzone.com (Ballet Talk for Dancers)- they have men's specific communities, as well as adult boards. Lots of fabulous information there.

    You can definetly still gain turnout, and if you've been doing yoga and have splits you're probably likely to do well in ballet. You of course will have limitations as your hip structure is set, but to do adult ballet, even performance level adult ballet, you don't need to have turn out like a professional. Dance with what you have!

    My dream is to be able to afford time and money to go to Sun King Adult Dance Camps- a summer intensive just for adults!
     
  23. J-Ro

    J-Ro Active Member

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    Check with the studio to see if they have a dress code. Some studios require the classic black leotard with pink tights. Some have no dress code. But ask them and they can guide you. Just make sure to get properly fitted for decent ballet slippers. The studio I attend has no dress code but for me, I prefer a leotard, pink or tan tights (yes, I often wear my skating tights to ballet class), and a short chiffon wrap skirt. (Although I've been studying ballet since the age of 5, because I've also been skating for most of that time, too, I have developed a thicker bottom end--the notorious "skater's butt" and heavier thighs than a traditional ballet dancer--so I'm a little self-concious in ballet class with all those mirrors so I love my chiffon wrap skirts!)
     
  24. J-Ro

    J-Ro Active Member

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    Just find a dance school that has adult beginner lessons. You will find people of all ages, and many beginners much older than 29. And men, too. You can always benefit from ballet. And do NOT worry about splits. That's not the point. While advanced and professional dancers attain this position in many moves, it's just part of extension. A good ballet class focuses on proper technique, not how high or how wide your legs can go. For example, in one class, someone with super flexibility will be able to perform a grand jete in a split in the air while others' legs are at a 90 degree angle. It doesn't matter as long as your technique is correct. Extension, turnout, and proper body positions are things you develop over time, not something that you have to start ready-made for. That's why it's a beginner class. They will start you off very slowly. There's no need to be intimidated because in a beginner class, everyone's at the same level!
     
  25. PDilemma

    PDilemma Well-Known Member

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    I always wore athletic leggings or yoga pants and a stretch tank top of some sort. IME, the women who showed up in full out tights, leotard, skirt, etc...were the first to quit. :lol:

    Both studios I took classes at required shoes but otherwise you could wear whatever you wanted. I recommend something easy to move in. One woman came in jeans all the time and ended up standing there watching. You can't do leg stretches on the barre in jeans or even get into a basic arabesque position. The teacher would gently suggest workout clothes every single week to no avail. There was also an extremely uncoordinated 19 year old with no prior dance experience in one of my classes who took to showing up in pointe shoes. I was shocked that the teachers (a couple rotated) did not put a stop to that. One did remind her that she signed a release that if she was injured they were not responsible. And one woman showed up to the same class to try it out in the street shoes called "ballet flats" because she thought they were really ballet shoes. She couldn't move her foot properly.
     
  26. ballettmaus

    ballettmaus Well-Known Member

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    While most studios won't say anything if you wear socks, especially when it's your first lesson, be careful about wearing socks. Even on a dance floor they can be slippery. I have socks that I can't wear to jazz class because they're way too slippery. If they have a wooden floor I'd not recommend socks at all because even ballet slippers can be slippery on wood.
    I'd find out what the Studio recommends in regards to footwear - if you're sure that you will continue with ballet then get shoes beforehand, if not, the cheapest slippers are still around 17 US Dollars, as far as I know.
    Also, if you go and get slippers, you're faced with several choices - divided sole, sole over the whole foot, satin, leather, some other fabric... Check what's comfortable but pointing your feet in a slipper that has a divided sole is easier than in one that has a sole going along the length of the foot. Fabric, I find, is easier for that, too. Also, check if the shoe comes with elastics or not. If not, I would recommend getting an elastic and sewing it on. It keeps the slipper from slipping off your feet.

    If there's no dress code, wear what you're comfortable in. The only recommendation I have is that it's somehow form-fitting since the instructor will want to see your lines. And even though it might not matter so much in a beginner class, if you have long hair you might want to tie it away from your face and not necessarily in a low pony-tail. A braid would probably work well though, or a bun, even, depending.

    Otherwise, have fun because that's the most important part!
     
  27. mkats

    mkats New Member

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    About a year and a half ago I decided to quit skating for a number of reasons and on a whim, signed up for adult intro ballet lessons at a local studio. I ordered my very first pair of ballet slippers off of the internet and to my horror, they were too small... and me being cheap and not wanting to shell out for another pair, came up with the idea to cut open the front of the shoe and use the extra strap elastic to fashion a sort of flexible toe patch that I sewed in to give me an extra half inch or so. :shuffle: It worked pretty well and the shoes were still in good shape by the time I moved away!

    Happy dancing, everybody. Reading this thread brought back lots of good memories, I wish I still had the time :)
     
  28. J-Ro

    J-Ro Active Member

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    Often that is indeed the case with the fully-outfitted newbies in any activity, isn't it? I am also amazed that they even let the girl in pointe shoes in the class at all despite the liability release! And the jeans and the ballet flats! You can't make this s**t up.
     
  29. J-Ro

    J-Ro Active Member

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    This. ^^ Just to reinforce: I wouldn't recommend dancing in socks. Yes, they are slippery and not the best if you are just getting your ballet legs under you. You're going to need stability. Also, ballet slippers have better protection for the ball of your foot--which you will be on A LOT. Some manufacturers--Capezio is one--have many models that come with attached elastics. You may want to investigate shoes like this. Keep in mind that ballet shoe sizing is NOT the same as street shoe sizing. Not even close. Even among the same maker, different models can have a different sizing. I do recommend going to a dance supply store to get fitted because you want them to fit properly, like gloves, really. (Please don't buy your first pair on the web.) They shouldn't be too tight, but they shouldn't be loose anywhere, either. Again, check with the studio for advice and suggestions. You can probably get a decent pair in the $25 range.