Quality of Living worldwide city rankings

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by WildRose, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    You seem to be confusing Contra Costa and SF Counties. Why are you mentioning the commute from Orinda to Berkeley? What's in Berkeley? :confused:

    Orinda has cheaper housing costs? :lol: http://www.trulia.com/CA/Orinda/

    Also, have you looked at the Hilsborough school rankings? http://school-ratings.com/schoolRat...e=&lastOB=rank&qty=8&orderBy=rank&dir=reverse
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  2. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    Some include portions of Contra Costa County with the East Bay. Others don't. I tried to specify particular cities (Orinda and Berkeley) just to be clear though.
     
  3. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    Cheaper being a relative term ;). But compared to places like Palo Alto, Atherton, and whatnot, yeah--it's quite a bit cheaper.
    The latest rankings I saw have Orinda top. Schools in the Peninsula vary, but tend to be very good. The top I recall in the Peninsula was Monta Loma I think? Not sure I spelled that right. But that's a subsection of Mountain View IIRC. So it really comes down to specific schools.
     
  4. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    I bet I could find you examples of cheaper housing in Palo Alto and whatnot. Also, you may not know this but there are other places in the Peninsula, a lot cheaper than Orinda. Orinda is one of the most expensive places to live in the Bay Area. It's very very exclusive. You are just not familiar with the Bay Area.
    Yes, look at the link I provided for Hilsborough (very expensive). There is also Burlingame. Contra Costa (East Bay) is a bigger county and schools vary within. Some are good, some are less good.

    To be honest, I cannot make heads or tails of your previous post. Why are you talking about the commute from Orinda to Berkeley, again? Yes, it's easy but how is this relevant to me?

    Also, traveling to the Peninsula which is bigger than you realize can be easier than the commute to some locations in the East Bay (880 tends to be a nightmare most of the time), which is why we considered the Peninsula and not the East Bay in the first place. Again, you are just not very familiar.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  5. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    On average, housing is cheaper in Orinda believe it or not. Palo Alto average home price is $1,297,000 while in Orinda, the average home price is $857,000. That's a substantial difference IMO.
    Oh sure. But those places aren't typically noted for good school districts either. East Palo Alto is much cheaper, but it's not good for education.
    It's the most expensive area in Contra Costa County I think. But compared to places like Atherton (avg home $4,295,000), Hillsborough (avg home $2,990,000), or Los Gatos (avg home $1,195,999), it's quite a bit cheaper.
    That's why I specified public transportation (ie, the BART system). Because it's a rail system, it's unaffected by traffic.

    Anyhow, it's all neither here nor there. If you feel you have a great school in close proximity to work and relatives, then I guess you're set. I thought the issue was you didn't have access to a good school, so I was just suggesting places where that would be available in close public transport to SF.
     
  6. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    I see average listing price for Orinda as $1,446,029. Where did you get that number?

    There are good schools in other places on the Peninsula, i.e., Burlingame. Not sure why you only brought up the most expensive ones.

    I am not sure why you mentioned BART. It only goes from the East Bay to SF and SF airport. It's a long commute.

    Can I ask you without seeming to snark--do you honestly believe that you know the school/housing/commute situation in the Bay Area better than someone who lives here? I am curious.

    The issue was, why am I not moving from SF--I am not moving because I am temporarily willing to put up with the aspects of living here that I dislike for the privilege of being close to my family/friends and jobs. Mini Ice goes to a good school, we were lucky in that respect. But as I mentioned several times already, we are planning to eventually move elsewhere and are actively working on it.
     
  7. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    From Zillow. They have the average home prices for every city in the US. For example:
    Average home price in Burlingame is $999,900. Again, significantly more expensive than Orinda.
    Because a lot of people use it for transportation, and will choose housing locations based on proximity to BART (since it can cut down significantly on commute time--especially during rush hour).
    :confused:

    BART goes to downtown SF, Oakland, Fremont, all the way up to Richmond, and to Pittsburg in Contra Costa County. It's a very extensive transport system, and as I said, can get you to places faster than driving during rush hour. Going from Orinda to downtown SF takes less than 30 minutes.

    http://www.bart.gov/schedules/byline.aspx

    I'm just stating published stats--Orinda is cheaper than comparable places in the Peninsula, and BART commute from Contra Costa County to downtown SF is less than 30 minutes. One reason I know all this is because we were looking at moving to that area, and I research things rather meticulously when it comes to education and commuting times ;).

    Again, if you're all set with schools and stuff, then it's all neither here nor there.
     
  8. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    Right, because they said so on the Interwebz. Would you like me to provide other numbers from other websites, ad nauseum?
    I am not sure why you keep pushing the East Bay. Perhaps it's because you've read some average number somewhere about the Contra Costa county school district. Again, not everything you read on the Interwebz is practical and applicable to specific situations, like mine, for instance. There are much better individual schools in the Bay Area.
    And?
    Again, why Orinda? :confused:

    You've heard this before: reading stuff on random websites and living it are different things, vastly different. Orinda is not cheaper than many places with good schools on the Peninsula, with the average listing price of $1,446,029 in Orinda.

    You are not answering my question--do you really believe that you know this better?
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  9. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    No, because Zillow is the major real estate website that provides home estimates and city median home prices. It's quite well-known. But anyhow, you seemed to miss this comment I made:
    Not sure why you are getting fussy or combative. I mentioned Orinda because it has the top ranked schools in all of California, so if quality schooling were an issue for you, then I suggested that as an option cheaper and closer than the Peninsula (with great public transport to boot). If schooling isn't an issue, then it's not an issue.

    ;)
     
  10. kwanfan1818

    kwanfan1818 I <3 Kozuka

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    Great solution. For someone who has no issue breaking up his or her family.

    I can't remember where I read this joke recently -- could have been here -- but it goes something like:

     
  11. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    I know about zillow. No doubt you know the definition of average. Do you think that zillow's average quotes provide better and more comprehensive information about real estate than actually going around and looking at homes, talking to realtors, i.e., doing field research? Also, actually living in the area?
    That's the thing--Orinda is neither cheaper nor closer to me than the places on the Peninsula that I've considered--as in both looked on the internet and have physically gone there, to look both at schools and homes. You seem to be missing this point. Again, you cannot expect as you seem to do, to know the real situation from reading averages.


    I am also made it clear that I am not trying to be snarky, or if you prefer, fussy or combative. I am wondering why the insult.
     
  12. aliceanne

    aliceanne Well-Known Member

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    Canada would not look kindly on the U.S. casually allowing Canadians to emigrate after Canada provided them with an education and healthcare.

    I work at a medical research facility in the U.S. And this is a particularly sensitive issue when foreign scientists and physicians come to study or collaborate. The country that nurtured them wants them back.

    It is not just about protecting U.S. workers, although there is that too.

    Plus what country would want citizens who are going to leave as soon as the going
    gets rough? It makes sense to make the process difficult as a test of commitment.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  13. Really

    Really No longer just a "well-known member" Yay!

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    Seems to me that Canadians who wanted to work in the US badly enough were usually able to find a way to do so; that is, until the financial crisis hit. I'm sure it's probably not quite as easy as it used to be.
     
  14. purple skates

    purple skates Shadow dancing

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    To me it's Savannah Georgia - way more than San Francisco. Seriously. Except for the weather, it really reminded me of Europe.
     
  15. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    To me it's Boston, the architecture and the cobblestone streets. I would love to visit Savannah and Charleston.
     
  16. allezfred

    allezfred Old and Immature Admin Staff Member

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    Obviously, the divorce was a long time coming. It was more to illustrate that making a decision to move can be made if the will is truly there. :)
     
  17. kwanfan1818

    kwanfan1818 I <3 Kozuka

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    Yes and no. Until the financial crisis hit, H1 visas were usually gone by April nationally. Some friends in high tech told me that this is no longer true. However, it's become more difficult to claim that it is not possible to find the right skill set in the US, which is one of the requirements for the visa. When high tech was booming, employers could claim this for developers with little experience, because there were theoretically more jobs than schools graduating developers. Now, not so much.

    Makes sense, if the circumstances were at all similar.

    I suspect that if IceAlisa's complaints about the Bay Area are that strong, that the upsides of staying there -- family, friends, job -- are even stronger. In your example, obviously not.
     
  18. allezfred

    allezfred Old and Immature Admin Staff Member

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    Didn't realise that there were only one set of circumstances required for a person to move to another city. People move for all sorts of reasons.

    I suspect that IceAlisa just really likes living in San Francisco despite what she says. :lol:
     
  19. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    You got it, kwanfan1818.

    I suspect fred just really wants to move to Venezuela, despite what he says. ;)

    Seriously, there are great advantages to living here, no doubt. The different cultures, the food are great, not to mention the obvious draw of the family, friends and jobs. But the politics are infuriating, schools are abysmal (although we've managed to solve the problem) and the fog is depressing. Oh and aside from the magnificent Yuan Yuan Tan, SF Ballet sucks. :p

    Also, I really miss swimming in warm water. I grew up spending summers on the beach, so my dream is to live next to a body of water that's relatively warm and where I could have balmy summer nights. Working on this.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  20. *Jen*

    *Jen* Well-Known Member

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    I've lived in 4 cities - one until I was 21, and then 3 others in the past 6 years. I didn't just move city, I moved right out of my comfort zone, choosing another continent on the other side of the world.

    I will always have ties to some of those places, but where there's a will, there's a way. If you want to leave badly enough, you will. If, however, you decide there are some things where you are that are more important than moving, you'll stay, and if those things are so important than staying really isn't so bad, is it? :)
     
  21. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    I am not planning to stay though.

    Also, you may not be aware, but I have moved quite a bit around the world as well. I know all about getting out of the comfort zone. :lol:
     
  22. *Jen*

    *Jen* Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I am aware. What makes you think I was speaking directly to you? Quite a few people here mentioned a desire to move ;)
     
  23. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    Only the fact that you posted directly under my post and used the pronoun "you". :shuffle:
     
  24. *Jen*

    *Jen* Well-Known Member

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    But I didn't quote, and the pronoun "you" can be singular or plural ;) It was a general statement.
     
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  25. Ziggy

    Ziggy Well-Known Member

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    Yes. This sentence pretty much defines your existence on this board.
     
  26. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    While yours can be defined with just simply: sh!t-stirrer.

    It was what is known as ambiguous reference.