New Book Thread because somebody' has got to do it

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by rfisher, May 14, 2013.

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  1. nursebetty

    nursebetty New Member

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    Just finished "The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith. Pseudonym for J.K.Rowling and I liked it a lot. Am reading "Me Before You" by Jojo Moyes and am liking it also.
     
  2. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    I got two copies of Joy for wedding gifts and ended up giving both of them away because I never used them. I don't think of Joy as a chatty cookbook; it just always seemed like a pretty straightforward collection of pretty typical recipes to me.

    I put Dick Button's book on my Christmas list :D.
     
  3. PDilemma

    PDilemma Well-Known Member

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    Do not touch Attachments. It is just bad. The entire plot is weirdly stalkerish. You will want to gouge your eyes out then hunt Rainbow down and slap her silly. And if the plot doesn't do it, this will: all characters have Nebraska places for names including one with the hyphenated last name "Scribner-Snyder". You know, like the school district west of Fremont. And, oh yeah, her bestie's last name? Fremont.

    And while Fangirl is a better read, the main character "Cather" attends the university in the exceedingly tiny town of Lincoln (Rainbow apparently never actually left the campus during her own time in Lincoln) where she lives in Pound Hall. You know, the one attached to Cather Hall.

    These are things that I assume in no way jump out as cheesy and stupid to non-Nebraskans. Perhaps we in Nebraska were supposed to find it clever, but I did not.
     
  4. Impromptu

    Impromptu Well-Known Member

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    I did actually find The Joy of Cooking Useful .... Back in 1995, I used the Introduction to bread making to do a dramatic reading as part of an audition for a sketch comedy troupe. I got into the troupe. :)

    (Seriously, if you happen to have JoC on your shelf, go read some of the intro sections - especially for canning and for bread - they're unintentionally hysterical).

    I wouldn't use it as a cookbook, but as a piece of history, it's an interesting read (try reading back to back with The Feminine Mystique.
     
  5. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    [Lina Lamont voice]I liked it.[/Lina Lamont voice] :shuffle:

    But to each her own!

    In other news, after nearly three months (which came after something like 10 years of seeing it just sit there on the bookshelf), I've finished Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell! Woohoo!! :cheer2:
     
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  6. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    Joy of Cooking is probably the least-used cookbook on my shelf. It's too cumbersome and I haven't liked the one or two recipes I have tried.
     
  7. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    I've never used JoC for its recipes. However I have used it as how-to reference for technique when cooking something obscure or new-to-me. I can't actually think of what specifically, though ...
     
  8. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Port de bras!!!

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    I have ordered The Annotated Mansfield Park, due out in September 2014. :cheer2:

    Right now I am reading The Annotated Northanger Abbey and am loving the notes and illustrations. Since I haven't read the actual book in a long time, I am struck anew what the worldly, intelligent, sarcastic Henry Tilney would find in the dull and sheltered Catherine. I love how he insists on precision in word use--he is a geek! In fact, he would make an excellent FSUer, what with the ready snark and a tendency to nitpick. Elizabeth Bennet would have been a much better match for him. I just don't get the attraction. Perhaps being "fresh" and "artless" was the IT thing at the time. Le shrug.


    Ooooh, I simply must own Dick Button's book, even if I don't celebrate Christmas.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2013
  9. PDilemma

    PDilemma Well-Known Member

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    I do think it may be helpful to have never been to Scribner-Snyder High School or have lived in Fremont. That would cut down on the eye rolling every time you read the email headers.
     
  10. my little pony

    my little pony snarking for AZE

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    i ordered uncle dick's book the day it was available, i consider it a staple not for xmas

    i think i would enjoy those annotated austen's
     
  11. A.H.Black

    A.H.Black Well-Known Member

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    I need some suggestions. I have a 74-year-old sister who is pretty much bed-ridden. She is now interested in reading again. She likes historical/political fiction. West Wing was her all time favorite TV series. She also liked the Dick Francis mysteries. I thought of Irving Stone or Taylor Caldwell, but they are a bit old-fashioned. I thought of Diana Gabaldon but I don't think she would like the time-travel aspect of them. I'm looking for some good main stream ideas. Big long books are great, but I'm also thinking of trying to find some lighter weight, thinner books, as her hands don't work very well and I don't think she has much strength. She also wants books, rather than reading on her tablet.
     
  12. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    First thing I thought of was Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, set in the Tudor era. But both of those are big and long.
     
  13. Spinner

    Spinner Where's my book?

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    Anne Perry might be just right for what you want. She has many books, all around 200-ish pages, historical/period mysteries. A couple of my booksellers really like her writing. Good luck!
     
  14. PDilemma

    PDilemma Well-Known Member

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    Richard North Patterson. Particularly the books featuring the character Kerry Kilcannon. Also Exile and The Race.
     
  15. A.H.Black

    A.H.Black Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the ideas. I am sending links to her of all these authors to see if anyone strikes her fancy. The only one I have read is Anne Perry. My sister might enjoy some of her books. Both Patterson and Perry are easy to find at my local thrift store for almost nothing. I don't recall seeing Hilary Mantel - probably too new and too popular to show up at the thrift store yet.
     
  16. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I'm back into medieval mysteries: tore through Jeri Westerson's "Troubled Bones" during the snowstorm on Saturday and am now deepinto her next one in the series, "Blood Lance." They're Nos. 4 and 5 in her Crispin Guest series, about a young nobleman who lost his knighthood, property and title after being caught up in a treasonous plot to oust King Richard from the throne. Only the interferance of the Duke of Lancaster saved his life, but, now penniless and outcast from court, Crispin has turned to solving crimes and finding stolen goods for a meagre living, with his former pickpocket - turned apprentice Jack as his Watson. "Troubled Bones" concerns a plot to steal the relics of St. Thomas a Becket from Canterbury Cathedral and introduces Geoffrey Chaucer as Crispin's old friend spying for Lancaster while collecting material for what will become his famous "Canterbury Tales." "Blood Lance" involves the death of an armorer who had found and repaired a miraculous lance that is reputed to make the bearer unfeatable in combat.

    I have Dick Button's book next in the pile.
     
  17. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    ^^^
    Those sound like something I would enjoy!
    DB's book just arrived!
     
  18. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    Deborah Crombie might be good. She's like Dick Francis in that they're fast-paced mysteries and not too heavy, but also not fluffy or silly. They're a series and should be read in order if possible (the first one is A Share in Death).
     
  19. A.H.Black

    A.H.Black Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the idea. My sister and her husband used to keep a flat in London so she might enjoy these.
     
  20. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    Ooh, just spotted that there's another Flavia de Luce book coming out in February, The Dead in their Vaulted Arches. Unfortunately I wasn't quite quick enough though -- I'm #15 in the queue for 3 copies.
     
  21. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    If she likes Dick Francis, she might like Richard Pitman, John Francome or Lyndon Stacy--all horse-related mysteries.

    She might like The Tudor Conspiracy or for something more recent, Game Change, which is a remarkably entertaining read.

    zaphyre reads a lot of historical mysteries and usually has really good suggestions there.
     
  22. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Port de bras!!!

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  23. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I've just started Ashley Gardner's fourth Capt. Lacey Regency mystery, "The Sudbury School Murders." That's a pretty good series that is still ongoing. And I've also just found the first volume in Charles Finch's Victorian mystery series "A Beuatiful Blue Death" that looks interesting.

    Most of what I read nowadays is historical mystery so if there's an era you're interested in, let me know and I can come up with suggestions.
     
  24. dinakt

    dinakt Well-Known Member

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    I somehow could not get into 'Wolf Hall" and keep thinking I need to give it another try as it is so acclaimed and I love history, both non- fiction and fiction; and I do not need it to be fluffy. Just did not click for me. Did you like it?
    For historical mystery, I loved Iain Pears' "An Instance of the Fingerpost" ( a bit in the vein of Umberto Eco's "In the Name of the Rose" , except happening in England; and "The Dream of Scipio" ( a novel that switches times between Roman Empire, medieval and Second World War France, and basically is about personal choices within historical circumstances). I did not care for "Stone's Fall", his latest novel. He also writes "art mysteries" that my in- laws enjoy, I have not read them.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2013
  25. PDilemma

    PDilemma Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't get into Wolf Hall either. And I generally like historical fiction and all things British and find that period fascinating. I think I made it about halfway through and gave up.
     
  26. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    Oh, man. Reading Gone Girl for book club. Read probably the first 50 pages and skipped around the rest, but I'll get back to reading the rest.

    Is there ANYTHING redeemable about the two main characters? Or are they both just awful, manipulative people who I'll be happy to have done with when the book ends?
     
  27. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    I hated both of them but found Amy to be pretty fascinating by the end of it. But I still really like the book. My favorite Gillian Flynn book was Dark Places, though.
     
  28. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    For me the best part was thinking that at least they're perfectly matched to each other -- and it's a good book for making you feel fantastic about your own relationships!

    I did enjoy it in a twisted kind of way, kinda like watching a horror movie (again, the "at least it's not me" feeling). And now I need to read it again because my book club just picked it too. It will be interesting to see how it reads when I already know exactly what happens.
     
  29. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I'm reading Jeri Westerson's newest Crispin Guest mystery, which she calls "medieval noir" - "The Shasow of the Alchemist." The plot seems more convoluted than in past volumes, with Crispin drinking too much as he stumbles between cases: the alchemist's apprentise is murdered and his wife kidnapped; 25 people have died suddenly around the parish and a mysterious priest is stirring up the people with preditions of doom and hellfire. My main problem with this volume is that one of the main characters is Nicolas Flamel - and every time I read his name, I think of Harry Potter. :)
     
  30. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    The curse of the library hold list strikes again. Within the past week 7 books have come in! :eek:

    I'm midway through The Good Lord Bird. Fascinating fictional look at a slave boy posing as a woman hanging out with John Brown's gang of slave reformers. After that Allegiant came in. 500+ pages. I may be skipping the parts where Tris gazes at Four's lips/arms/eyes. That'll cut at least 100 pages. :p

    Then The Husband's Secret arrived. And I told them to keep Hild (the story of some saint - it looked good).

    Working my way through the YA dystopian series Life As We Knew It and the other 3 books. This time, it's an asteroid hitting the moon and causing tsunamis, volcano eruptions, and other fun stuff. I'm hoping to read all weekend. Now watch the family have other plans. :D

    PS - I'm a Tudorphile and I couldn't get into Wolf Hall or Bring Up the Bodies.
     
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