New Book Thread because somebody' has got to do it

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by rfisher, May 14, 2013.

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  1. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    It's awesome. Especially if you have ever had a dog. I also really, really thought she hit the nail on the head wrt (1) depression and (2) how we see ourselves.

    I feel bad for spilling a bit of dinner on my library book, but is it kind of OK because it was a chicken curry salad and the book is by an Indian guy and set in India? ;)
     
  2. Finnice

    Finnice Well-Known Member

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    Great, Michiruwater! My older son is two years younger than you, but basically, he had a similar experince, because the Finnish translations came later than the original versions. He did read two last books in English first. I think Harry Potter books in a wasy "saved" yuour generation, especially the boys, for reading.
     
  3. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    I read plenty both before and after Harry Potter :p But I get your meaning.
     
  4. Finnice

    Finnice Well-Known Member

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    Yes, sure, and my boys did/are doing the same. But there is not so many generation experiences in literature any more. For me, born in 1964, Lord of the Rins maybe waa that, but not so strongly than Harry Potters were at least here in Finland. I adore that series too, and it was wonderful to share it with my sosn.
     
  5. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    I could be wrong, but I don't think there were many literary crazes as big as Harry Potter. You are right, though, most of my classmates did not read very much if at all, and it seemed like all the girls around me mostly read Nicholas Sparks and Danielle Steele and the like. Or Twilight. Blergh.
     
  6. RockTheTassel

    RockTheTassel Well-Known Member

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    It is special, isn't it? I was a bit younger than you (eight when I started reading, fifteen when the last one came out), but growing up with it and having it be a part of childhood was a cool experience.
     
  7. RockTheTassel

    RockTheTassel Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, the only recent things that are a little similar to the HP craze are Twilight and The Hunger Games, but even those haven't come close. Not only because they aren't as good (to many people), but also because there wasn't the same built up anticipation for years. The only books that were long awaited by the majority of fans were the final ones in those series. Several of the Harry Potter book releases were a big deal.
     
  8. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    I think some of it has to do with the Harry Potter books coinciding with the increasing adoption of the internet, which allowed for more hype and more of a cultural phenomenon feel that might not have occurred to the same extent otherwise.

    I was at university when I started reading the series, which by then had three published books. I really enjoyed it at first, but Order of the Phoenix came close to ruining it for me and I was never as interested after that. I was also working with elementary school kids at the time, and my impression was that HP didn't get kids reading in general, it got them to read Harry Potter. The few who read other things are the ones who probably would have become readers even without it.

    I read Danielle Steele when I was in 7th and 8th grade :shuffle: as did a lot of people I knew. Also Clan of the Cave Bear & sequels and a lot of V.C. Andrews. Middle school is not a time where many kids exhibit great taste in fiction, I suppose.
     
  9. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    When Harry Potter came out, I was obviously not the target audience, so I didn't read it. :lol: But, a coworker who used to own her own bookstore (and then became an office drone), raved about it and told me I'd enjoy it. She was right. I was hooked. My son was in Kindergarten and was Harry Potter for Halloween that year :) (one of many Hogwarts students in his school parade). I remember being happy that his friends were all reading the books. It got to the point where the middle school teachers would ban Harry from the book reports - teacher said you could tell who just watched the movies. We went to all the movies, the last, we actually saw twice in a row - once in an almost empty theater, the second in a packed one. I remember ordering a pizza for my son and his friends so I could get through book 6 in peace. 7 was rough - I had tissues ready. Midnight book sales, and waiting for the book to arrive on the doorstep - it actually was magical.

    When I was younger, I read my grandmother's harlequins cover to cover (which probably ruined me for dating) :p
     
  10. Evilynn

    Evilynn ((Swedish skating dudes))

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    I'm a bad Swede and still haven't read the first one. :shuffle: However, the reviews have been mostly good as far as I can tell. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2013
  11. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    I went to the midnight release of Breaking Dawn, because I was writing an article about it. That was a trip. :lol:

    I'm excited about the Hyperbole and a Half book myself, but I can't get to it right away -- too much other stuff to read first. Among other things, I've just got a gig reviewing the new Fosse biography.
     
  12. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I jumped from medieval mystery to paranormal detective: Kat Richardson's "Poltergist" the second in her Greywalker series. I'm only a few chapters in and finding all the woo-woo walking-in-two-dimensions-stuff kind of confusing and a little tedious. I get that Harper, the main character, is new to her abilities and doesn't really understand what she sees or know what to do about any of it, but, honestly, how many times can she wail about her ignorance? It's getting old, girl. Her electronics-genius sidekick guy is witty and likable, with just enough mystery about him to make him interesting, though. I'll keep reading this one, but Number 3 is iffy at this point.
     
  13. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    Continuing on the Elizabeth George read-a-thon. And I am angry with her for A Traitor to Memory!!
    A violin was killed!! A really, really rare, old, probably priceless violin!!!
    :drama: At least she was pretty good with the details and didn't just take the easy route of having the main character play a Stradivarius; nice to see Guarneri gettin' some respect.
     
  14. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    Finally read The Round House. Wasn't sure what to expect going in, but I really enjoyed it until the last chapter. Then it was ruined for me.

    And for anyone looking for a Kindle deal, there's a lot of books on sale for $2.40 today. Most of the Game of Thrones series, Ender's Game, The Book Thief, and The Shining. There was a $1.40 sale last week, wonder if there's a $3.40 coming up soon? :lol:
     
  15. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    I'm reading Dish: How Gossip Became the News and the News Became Just Another Show. I picked it up because it was written by Jeanette Walls and I really enjoyed The Glass Castle, and now I cannot put it down because....it's chockful of juicy gossip. :shuffle:

    Well, it's book filled with ironies. What's one more?

    One of the interesting things about this particular gossip is that nearly everything in the book happened in my lifetime, so I remember most of it as I experienced it at the time. I'm not sure someone younger would find it as interesting. I'm up to the O.J. Simpson case, which is just :yikes:. So many things in this books are just :yikes:. I have never understood why someone would want to be famous, and after reading all this, I find it even harder to understand. Your friends and family will sell you out at the drop of a hat.

    It's given me what I consider an interesting discussion point for a class--at one point (Elvis' death) a New York Times newspaper editor says that they don't publish things because they are interesting; they publish things because they are significant. He had to apologize for saying so a couple of days later. And later in the book, Rupert Murdoch asks a convention of media movers and shakers why the mainstream media is so intent on selling people things they don't want (significant news) instead of what they do want (interesting news) when such a business model is so obviously doomed to fail.

    Interesting stuff to think about. But I gotta admit, if the book were just about such significant stuff, I would read it but slowly. It's the interesting stuff that keeps me flipping pages for hours at a time. :shuffle:
     
  16. PrincessLeppard

    PrincessLeppard Pink Bitch

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    I need to check that out. :shuffle:

    I finished Dr. Sleep last night around 1 am. Really well done, with a good ending. Good endings are not really Stephen King's thing. (the end of the The Dome was particularly :rolleyes: ) But I really liked this one.

    I hope they don't feck up the movie too badly.
     
  17. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    It kind of fizzled a bit toward the end; Princess Diana seems like the obvious closer subject, but the author barely seems interested in her by that point. Even the OJ chapter seems rather rushed.

    On another note, I read Child-Proofing ‘Harry Potter’ earlier today and have been thinking about it ever since. What say ye, Potter fans and parents?

    The idea of "pinkwashing" a book about eating vegetables so boggles my mind that I can't believe she ever even considered reading Harry Potter to her child.
     
  18. attyfan

    attyfan Well-Known Member

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    I have difficulty imagining someone crazy enough to read Harry Potter to a 5 year old. Read them something else.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2013
  19. oleada

    oleada Well-Known Member

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    Please tell me that's satire.

    If she feels that her son is too young for Harry Potter, then don't read it to him. Or if she has some issues with some of the behaviors, discuss it with the kid. I doubt Harry Potter is going to warp her special snowflake's fragile, delicate mind. :rolleyes:

    My parents never censored books. I somehow survived. :p
     
  20. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    That article is so ridiculously stupid that I am actually seething after reading it. If you feel you must censor something for your child, then wait until the child is old enough to read it. I was reading adult fantasy books at the age of 10, and all the sex and murder and intrigue didn't in any way ruin my life, or even impede it. I am so glad I did not have this woman for a mother.
     
  21. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    :huh: Is this real?
     
  22. PrincessLeppard

    PrincessLeppard Pink Bitch

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    I just found out Game Change 2 is out. Excuse me while I go hit the bookstore...
     
  23. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    My father intentionally gave me "mature"/adult books to read.
     
  24. rfisher

    rfisher Satisfied skating fan

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    I'm presuming she didn't read any nursery rhymes or sing songs either. Surely, she didn't want to traumatize with that cradle falling from the treetops. Or little bunny fou-fou, we all know what happens to him. Ring-around-the-rosy refers to the dying from the plague--surely she didn't want to go there. One of my then five-year-olds favorite stories was the Elephant Child by Kipling (mostly because he liked trying to say grey-green greasy Limpopo River) with scary crocodiles trying to eat the curious Elephant Child or Rikki-Tikki-Tavi (scary cobras!). He also like Cookie Monster and Cookie Tree and thought it hilarious when Cookie monster threatened to turn the tree into pencils. But pink washing vegetables? Seriously?

    I agree 5 is too young to appreciate Harry Potter. It was written for 12 year old and up, but this lady has issues.
     
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  25. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    That's not what I expected pinkwashing to mean. :shuffle:

    And yes, she's an idiot. If you don't want to wait until your child is mature enough to deal with the darker themes in Harry Potter, at least stop after the first three. And don't try to turn every sentence into some morality play.
     
  26. my little pony

    my little pony snarking for AZE

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    when my godchildren started school, i found out they changed the words to ring around the rosy. instead of ashes ashes they said something else. i will have to ask their mom what it was, i was so annoyed. i hate change especially if it because people are being wussies.
     
  27. BigB08822

    BigB08822 Well-Known Member

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    Her child is in for a very rude awakening when he gets old enough to start exploring the world for himself and hearing some of the things coming out of his friends mouths and the stories they tell. He will be horribly confused and probably not well adjusted, at all. She is crazy and who can edit a book as they are reading it? I bet she sits down and re-writes the book ahead of time, she seems THAT nuts.
     
  28. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    I just picture him talking about Harry Potter with his friends later. "How much bullshit was it that McGonagall made Harry write that essay after he stole the broom?" *blank stares*
     
  29. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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  30. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    So I suppose books like Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales are entirely off the menu. Grimms' too. Goodness forbid her precious darling actually learns anything at all about the world they will be entering in about a decade.

    My son's class is reading 'Sarah, Plain and Tall,' a lovely book I might add. The kids loved it and got it, at least my kid did. But I guess I should have pinkwashed the fact that Sarah was a mail-order bride and that the mother died. But I didn't. I think they are at the age when they should start learning about death and loss.
     
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