New Book Thread because somebody' has got to do it

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by rfisher, May 14, 2013.

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  1. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I have Elizabeth George's short story collection, "I, Richard" going in the car. I don't know if it's abridged or not but I've had to rewind the first sory a couple times, thinking I missed something.

    And I'm reading James Patterson's "The 11th Hour" this weekend. Totally different style. It feels almost too spare but that could just be the contrast between it and the lusher prose I've been reading before it.
     
  2. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    I agree that The Book Thief will have a hard time translating to film. But I'm keeping an open mind. Gone Girl, OTH, is tailor-made for film I think. I'm not sure about Ben Affleck (I know he's not actually that much older but he seems older -- and that's 2 questionable casting choices for him now!) but I think Rosamund Pike is a great choice. Tho I seem to recall it was Reese Witherspoon who optioned the book, I had already been picturing her in the role.

    I don't know if it's abridged or not either, but I do remember being hugely disappointed with the collection. Some novelists just can't do short stories, and George is obviously one of them.
     
  3. Erin

    Erin Well-Known Member

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    I'm only at 2 on that list (Gone Girl and Book Thief) but I generally prefer to see the movie before I read the book anyway. I realize this is somewhat backward, but it seems to be the best way for me to enjoy both. If the movie is halfway decent, I can enjoy it on its own merits without comparing to the book, then I am usually wanting more, so I check out the book and since it is typically better than the movie, I enjoy that even more. I seem to have quite a few examples where I see the movie first and like both the book and the movie but only a handful where I've read the book first and still liked the movie.
     
  4. Allskate

    Allskate Well-Known Member

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    I tend to feel the same way. Or, since I have a terrible memory, I don't want to see the movie until quite some time has passed since I've read the book. However, it's been a number of years since I read The Book Thief and I'm still having a hard time imagining that as a movie.
     
  5. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    I have a hard time imagining it as a movie as well.

    I love the idea of Rosamund Pike as Amy almost as much as I liked the idea of Witherspoon herself in the role. Ben Affleck, not so sure. Wasn't Nick a little younger? But David Fincher is a good choice and I really want them to cast Lucy Hale as Andie so bad. She's tailor-made for the role.
     
  6. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member

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    Just spent a couple of quiet hours today changing out the books in the hallway case, something I do periodically since most of my books are in boxes in my bedroom. Instead of doing my usual alpha-by-author, I went with sets of books: Library of America, Vintage Crime, Central European Classics, Northwestern University Press, Femmes Fatales: Women Write Pulp, etc. I separated the sets with trilogies and omnibi - The Cairo Trilogy by Mahfouz; the Claudine novels; the Vintage edition of Isaak Dinesen's Tales; and so on. I like the look of it. I also like the idea of browsing the case thematically.
     
  7. A.H.Black

    A.H.Black Well-Known Member

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    I finished The Goose Girl, by Shannon Hale today. I liked this re-telling of the fairy tale although I liked Princess Academy better. I have Austenland as well. I hesitate reading it as the movie is coming out soon and I usually don't like getting caught up in movie hype. I may save it for later.

    And, yes, I'm still plowing through Vanity Fair.
     
  8. oleada

    oleada Well-Known Member

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    I've read Divergent, Reconstructing Amelia, If I Stay and Gone Girl. I can't imagine If I Stay as a great movie...I know it was a popular book, but out of the dead/almost dead/dying teenage books, Before I Fall is much stronger. I liked Divergent, but haven't read the sequels. I think Shailene Woodley will do the character justice. Reconstructing Amelia is a meh book, but I can see Nicole Kidman doing the character much better than the author herself did.
     
  9. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    Some of my favourite movies of all time were made from meh books -- when there's a good story in there somewhere, it just wasn't realized very well by the author.
     
  10. quartz

    quartz Far beyond these castle walls

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    Since I work at a bookstore, where I am fanatical about proper merchandising and alphabetization, at home I am the exact opposite. My books are shelved more or less thematically, but generally I like to display my books by their prettiness factor.
    I group according to size and style, some upright, others stacked.....I like my home library to be all about the aesthetics.
     
  11. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    I liked Before I Fall much more than If I Stay, too. I thought Reconstructing Amelia sounded interesting; why was it meh? Writing? Story?
     
  12. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member

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    Bookstore veteran of eight years here. Which is why I always have more books than any given abode can hold. I like all my foreign language books in one case in my bedroom, alpha by author within language. I also like all books by an author to be in one place. This becomes a problem with Obskuropean writers like Bolesław Prus, whose works I've collected piece-meal, in whatever translation I could get my hands on. Right now he's scattered all over. Although I have to admit that if I put all his books together on one shelf, it wouldn't look very pretty.
     
  13. quartz

    quartz Far beyond these castle walls

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    I have too many books for my just under 1000 sq ft home. I have weeded out countless times and still buy more. Between my employee discount, and thrift store and yard sale finds, books just seem to want to come home with me. I also collect old books, from the late 1800's-early 1900's just for pretty factor. I am pretty much at the point now, where I cannot weed out anything more. If my son ever moves out, I may be able to turn his bedroom into my library.
     
  14. oleada

    oleada Well-Known Member

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    More the writing. I thought the story sounded interesting too, which is why I read it. The writing isn't anything special, and the characters are really annoying and unlikable (Gone Girl's characters are unlikable too, but I was invested in the story; it was not the case with this book). And then there's this whole "reveal" that is super cliche.

    Also I lived in the area the book takes place in and it just felt like she was namedropping places :p
     
  15. Buzz

    Buzz Well-Known Member

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    Assassin's Creed Renaissance - yeah I know... it is cotton candy for the brain but I guess I was just in one of those moods and I am actually enjoying the book.
     
  16. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    "The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog," "Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus," and "Don't Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late," by Mo Willems, are works of genius.

    Just had to share that.
     
  17. jeffisjeff

    jeffisjeff Well-Known Member

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    My son loved the pigeon books!
     
  18. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    Oh yes, the pigeon books. Very cute. We loved them too.
     
  19. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    whee! thanks. That gif of Leo dancing :rofl: he must have used this for inspiration :p

    I'm starting to question my book-choosing skills. I just got another disappointment, although this one I'll finish. It's a YA novel called 13 Reasons Why, and the concept is very interesting - several months after the suicide of a teenaged girl, one of her classmates receives a mysterious package full of cassette tapes she recorded detailing why she chose to kill herself. Each person who receives the tapes played some sort of role (many unknowingly) in her decision. Unfortunately, the writing is mediocre, and the book is as subtle and nuanced as an ABC Afterschool Special. I'm only halfway through, and I get it, I get it! We all need to be kinder to each other! Rumors are bad! Not saying goodbye to the girl who sits behind you could ruin her day! I should have known it was nothing more than a Story With A Message....the first couple of pages are accolades by (apparently) teenagers, saying things like "this book literally changed my life". Plus, it needs a continuity editor, stat. The majority of the plot unfolds in the past, and the timeline is a bit questionable :shuffle:

    Going back to "classics", I recently watched the film Infamous, about Truman Capote during the time he was writing In Cold Blood. I've never read In Cold Blood, but now I'm interested. Thoughts from those who've read it?
     
  20. Erin

    Erin Well-Known Member

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    Aw crap...that's the next book that my book club is reading. I may have to question my choice of book club because so far my reaction to every book I've read for it has been "meh". I might stay being a member but maybe make the decision on a month-by-month basis as to whether I'll actually read the book. If September gets busy, I'll give this one a pass.

    I read it for the same reason (well, after seeing both Capote and Infamous) and I would recommend it. Gruesome (obviously given the subject matter), but extremely well-written.
     
  21. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    It's a very quick read, it definitely won't be taxing. I would actually be interested to hear what someone else thinks about that book.
     
  22. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    I think YA tends to have obvious messages; it's one of the things, IMO, that obviously sets it apart.

    I see there is a new genre called New Adult now that is supposed to bridge the gap between YA and Adult. I haven't read any of it yet, but have been wondering if there is more moral ambiguity or just more sex :p. From what I've seen, I'm thinking there's just more sex.

    ETA: Since you want to know what other people think, I read 13 Reasons Why and was rather meh about it--but thought that it was a very good book for the YA market. I could see my daughter and her friends reading it and finding it powerful and meaningful. I don't remember noticing any continuity errors and I thought the book was well-written for the genre. *shrug*

    In Cold Blood is an excellent book and one that is important in both the True Crime and New Journalism genres (if you like either of those, ICB is one of the greats); just be aware that Capote's insistence that it is all absolutely true is a weeeeeeee bit false.
     
  23. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    I think I have been a bit spoiled by many of the YA books/series that skew a bit to the "adult" part of Young Adult. This is far more of a Tween book, I think.

    I thought the film did a pretty good job of preparing me for the elasticity of Capote's truths :lol:
     
  24. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    I don't. :shuffle:

    But you're only halfway through it, right? I'm not sure you've gone far enough into it to know why Hannah killed herself yet. There's more to it than just rumors and small unkindnesses. It's also about the responsibility you bear for doing nothing when you could do something. The rumors and small unkindnesses play a role, but there is a context for them that I don't think you've gotten to yet.
     
  25. A.H.Black

    A.H.Black Well-Known Member

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    I'm different than others. In Cold Blood is one of the two or three books I stopped reading after about 50-100 pages. i thought it was revolting. I will refuse to ever consider it again. My 2 cents.
     
  26. millyskate

    millyskate Well-Known Member

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    Wandering into the book thread:)

    What a fascinating read in itself!

    A couple of weeks ago I read "The God of Small Things" http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9777.The_God_of_Small_Things
    It truly is worth its Booker prize. So much depth, and it held my attention until the very end.


    On a "lighter" note, I'm currently reading "Sidney Chambers and The Shadow of Death" by James Runcie. It's a nice read (short murder mysteries) but I think I'd enjoy it much more if it weren't about an Anglican priest - the author clearly has absolutely no understand of either the Christian faith or Anglicanism. The priest's habits and beliefs appear to be more in line with Catholicism, and his spiritual musings don't ring true.
    It's a shame because there's a lot of potential - the atmosphere is great and the stories hang together.
     
  27. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    yes, a little over halfway so far - and the message of doing nothing has been introduced.

    I do hope that it will turn around by the end (as much as a book where you go into it knowing someone kills themself can turn around, anyway).

    well, alrighty then! :lol:

    there are some other books that are considered classics that I somehow didn't read in school, and sometimes I go back and can't slog through them - because they just remind me of school even though they were never assigned to me. Huckleberry Finn is one - I bought it a few years ago and only got a third of the way through because I was a bit bored :shuffle:

    Re: Steinbeck - I had to read The Grapes of Wrath between 10th & 11th grade and turn in a journal at the end of the summer. The previous year i'd switched to this new school, they expected me to read the drop dead boring Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, I balked and tried to BS my way through it and got a D in English for the first time in my life (just the 1st quarter). So I took this summer reading VERY seriously and documented my thoughts on TGOW in a very detailed manner. I actually enjoyed the book, but I was enraged by the ending. My teacher handed my journal back to me asking why - saying it had been a very controversial ending. I can guess why that was, but I just really hated the character of
    Rosasharn and was not interested in any redemption for her
    . :p

    I wonder if I still have that journal :lol:
     
  28. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    Is this your first time in the book threads? Well, if so, welcome, book lover!

    The God of Small Things is one of my favourite books of all time. There have been many Booker winners that I've tried to read, or managed to read but couldn't get on board with all the hype. The God of Small Things is the exception to prove the rule. Once I stopped fighting the unusual narrative style, I just let the book carry me along. It was an incredible journey.

    BTW, her non-fiction is also well worth reading, esp. Walking with the Comrades.
     
  29. millyskate

    millyskate Well-Known Member

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    Yes it is! At least in a few years :lol: can't remember having ventured into here before. Thanks for the recommendation...
     
  30. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    Five Things You Need to Know About Dating a Book Nerd

    Number four cracked me up:

    4. Want to get a book nerd’s attention? Try sexting: Snapchat a picture of the book you’re reading, with a steaming cup of coffee near it but not too near it on a flat, stable surface. Oh, baby… It’s so hot how you respect the printed page and always take care with liquids.
     
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