New Book Thread because somebody' has got to do it

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by rfisher, May 14, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Lacey

    Lacey Well-Known Member

    8,999
    869
    113
    Read Colum McCann's newest TransAtlantic, does anyone know of any of his older books:

    This Side of Brightness
    Let the Great World Spin
    Dancer
     
  2. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

    39,014
    6,748
    113
    If anyone is in the market for books (and really, who isn't?), Better World Books is having a flash sale for the next 12 hours or so: http://www.betterworldbooks.com/go/booklovers

    Every time you buy a book, the store makes a donation to a world literacy group. Good cause and a good store!
     
  3. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

    31,144
    4,379
    113
    Fitzgerald is no more hypocritical than Aerosmith singing Eat The Rich.
     
  4. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

    39,014
    6,748
    113
    I don't know that I would equate the two, but let's say that I do. And?
     
  5. Matryeshka

    Matryeshka Well-Known Member

    12,478
    3,528
    113
    I loathe and despise the Great Gatsby with every fiber of my being. I hated it at 15, I hated it at 20, I hated it at 25. There are not words in any language to describe my hatred of the basic storyline. BUT. I also cannot deny:

    I've decided that paragraph is not part of the book. It was tacked on by some uncredited intern.
     
  6. oleada

    oleada Well-Known Member

    29,018
    3,874
    113
    I haven't read Gatsby. I tried but I got bored :shuffle:

    I finished "Victoria's Daughters" which I think was suggested by IceAlissa in one of these threads. I liked it a lot. Victoria was so meddlesome and annoying (felt so bad for poor Beatrice), but the whole story is so fascinating and I kind of want to read more about that era.
     
  7. my little pony

    my little pony snarking for AZE

    31,310
    8,444
    113
    matry, isnt your dog named gatsby?
     
  8. Matryeshka

    Matryeshka Well-Known Member

    12,478
    3,528
    113
    He is named Gatsby. I only ever promised snarks in the book thread--I never promised consistency. I like the name. I also considered Darcy, and I hate Jane Austen even more. I can at least respect Fitzgerald. Pride and Prejudice makes me want to join a local book burning. But I like the Austen movies sometimes--the less like the book, the better. :lol:

    I do get why it's a classic--I did teach the damn thing in AP American Lit and did an almost-credible job. Like others have said, I know why it's considered a great work of literature. The language is beautiful and it's great from an historical perspective--it gives such a perfect window into the excesses of the 1920s. People enjoy reading for different reasons--I read for character. If you're reading for character, The Great Gatsby is not going to do it for you. If you're reading for beauty of language, I can see how it's a total turn-on.
     
  9. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member

    7,898
    1,391
    113
    Last night I finished Welcome Strangers, the final volume in Mary Hocking's "Good Daughters" trilogy and liked it very much. Although there were a couple of characters I just could not warm to, it was, by and large, a satisfying conclusion to the story. As an antidote to Depression-era to Cold War Britain, I started Elizabeth von Arnim's charming novel The Solitary Summer. Von Arnim also wrote Mr. Skeffington, which the Bette Davis movie was based on, and The Enchanted April, which has been staged and filmed numerous times since 1922. The 1991 movie version is delightful, and true to the spirit of the novel.
     
  10. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

    9,905
    1,662
    113
    Sounds like Fitzgerald read too much Thomas Mann (obsessed with the happy blue-eyed people, at least in one book I was forced to read).

    I'd read it again only so that I could have an intelligent conversation about it and understand other people's points of view and maybe find something to appreciate or see something differently. I may or may not do that prior to our meeting on that book (not until February).
     
  11. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

    10,388
    3,481
    113
    Busy reading weekend here. I'm totally caught up on Louise Penny's Gamache series and have preordered the book coming out next week.

    Read Orphan Train. I knew nothing about the 200,000 children sent from NYC to the midwest (from the 1850's to the 1930's). It was interesting, but it lost me near the end with some really implausible plot twists. Tried reading All That Is - couldn't get into it, so back to the library it goes...

    Finally started And The Mountains Echoed. I can tell it's going to become an obsession. The first chapters just grabbed me.

    Kindle wise, The Book Thief and Anansi Boys just came in on library loan.
     
  12. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

    5,203
    1,025
    113
    I won a copy of The Mountains Echoed a couple of months ago but haven't managed to squeeze it in yet between all my library loans and book club books.

    I'm nearly finished The Book Thief, and loving it. Anansi Boys is next on my list.
     
  13. A.H.Black

    A.H.Black Well-Known Member

    2,053
    115
    63
    I liked The Book Thief as well. I currently enjoying The Goose Girl.
     
  14. Erin

    Erin Well-Known Member

    5,230
    939
    113
    I've spent the last few weeks alternating between Nick Hornby and re-reads of annotated Austens. Strange combination, I know. The Austen re-reads were a result of seeing a disappointing stage version of Pride and Prejudice that had me needing the books to cleanse my palate. Hopefully the combination of that and Persuasion will tide me over until the annotated Northanger Abbey comes out on October 1. The only thing really notable thing about the read was that I was struck with a horrific thought that since one of the first words I would use to describe myself is "practical", would that mean I would be Charlotte Lucas? However, I can't see myself ever marrying a Mr. Collins, no matter how practical a choice that would be. I mentioned it to a friend and she agreed that I was definitely not Charlotte and that if I was any Austen character, it was Emma. I'm not sure what to make of that exactly...Emma is probably my least favorite of Austen's novels, but it might be worth another read to see if my friend is right.

    As for the Nick Hornby that was mixed in, I really enjoyed About a Boy and was less enamoured with High Fidelity. Maybe it's because, even though they both feature male characters with arrested development, there was more growth in the About a Boy protagonist. Or perhaps it was because I could hear Hugh Grant's voice in About a Boy and found it charming whereas even though I haven't seen the movie High Fidelity, I still pictured the main character as a smarmy John Cusack.

    Now I'm reading Left Neglected by Lisa Genova (who also wrote Still Alice) for my book club. It is a good read, although I can guess where it is going. Overworked power mom gets into car accident, with some lasting effects and at the halfway point, my guess is that she will not return to her high-powered job and will decide she is happier without it. The specific type of brain injury (called Left Neglect) is pretty interesting though, the main character is likeable, and it's a pretty quick read.
     
  15. oleada

    oleada Well-Known Member

    29,018
    3,874
    113
    And the Mountains Echoed is also on my to-read list!

    I'm halfway through Kate Atkinson's Behind the Scenes at the Museum, which I'm loving. I can see similarities between that and Life After Life, but I'm liking this more. It's so funny but the writing is also gorgeous. I love the narrator; she is so likable. I like how the story is woven through the generations.
     
  16. Impromptu

    Impromptu Well-Known Member

    1,499
    415
    83
    Ah, I think I know which production you're talking about. I'd been debating whether or not to go to that. I love P&P but that company can be really hit/miss with their shows (I think they spend too much of their budget on wardrobe). I still have flashbacks from a horrific production they did of The Seagull they did years ago.

    I just finished Mira Grant's Newsflesh trilogy, which I loved, but now puts me in a bit of a deficit, because nothing I've been reading holds up in comparison. Going to read Life After Life when I go on vacation this week, so I do have that to look forward to.
     
  17. aftershocks

    aftershocks Well-Known Member

    4,938
    817
    113
    Hilarious Reject-A-Hit letter from Writer's Digest sponsored program calling for submissions of spoof rejection letters for well known best-sellers.

    Excerpt from spoof-rejected letter by Edward Murphy:

    :rofl:

    See July/Aug 2013 Writer's Digest for the full letter.
     
  18. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

    31,144
    4,379
    113
    I inhaled Life After Life but didn't finish Behind the Scenes at the Museum, don't remember why. Perhaps a Harry Potter book came out that needed reading. :shuffle:
     
  19. rfisher

    rfisher Satisfied skating fan

    41,760
    8,170
    113
    To quote Mark Twain: A classic is a book people praise and don't read. :D
     
  20. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member

    7,898
    1,391
    113
    I have two books going at the moment, The Solitary Summer by Elizabeth von Arnim. It's the sequel to her charming Elizabeth and Her German Garden and, in a way, a fore-runner of The Enchanted April.

    And IceAlisa inspired me to dip into Dans le noir (In the Dark) by Svetlana Velmar-Jankovic, a Serbian writer who landed on my shelf recently. This one will require much more attention than von Arnim's witty observations and delightful descriptions of her country garden, so I expect to take it slowly.
     
  21. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

    4,792
    1,168
    113
    I have one of Jack Higgins' Sean Dillon espionage thrillers going in the car. I like Clive Cussler better even if I know the "Hero saves the World" formula by heart. In paper, I have Karen Harper's "The Poyson Garden" going while I wait for another Matthew Bartholomew mystery to arrive.
     
  22. oleada

    oleada Well-Known Member

    29,018
    3,874
    113
    Eys, I've had that problem, too :shuffle:

    Anyway, I finished it last night and LOVED it. I actually liked it more than Life After Life. Highly recommend it. There's a reveal that didn't quite work so well for me, but the way the stories are woven through time are fantastic. And the writing is beautiful.

    I picked up Marisha Peshel's Night Film, which just came out and looks fascinating. Yay for murder mysteries and cinema :cheer:
     
  23. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

    10,388
    3,481
    113
    Finished And the Mountains Echoed. Cried. I love a book that doesn't give us 'tidy endings'. The story kept me engaged, and thinking. Fabulous.

    Now reading Blood & Beauty about the Borgias, one of my favorite twisted families. I was thrilled to see this come out (and get good reviews). But rumor has it that it stops way short of Alexander's death, so maybe there's a sequel being written?
     
  24. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

    31,144
    4,379
    113
    Very cool! I have my copy of Proust's In Search of Time Lost and am going to need someone to hold my hand through it. Has anyone read it? May be I will give Behind The Scenes another try some day.

    BTW, that JKR murder mystery was just alright after all. It had very well-written pieces of dialog but overall it wasn't as absorbing as I would like a murder mystery to be. I wasn't dying to find out whodunnit. I actually didn't really care.

    Picked up a used copy of Joyce Carol Oates' Middle Age in a book store while on vacation. I guess I might forgive her My sister, my love and other crimes against literature.
     
  25. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

    14,554
    2,436
    113
    Perhaps not.
    I read a non-fiction account of the same subject.
    What actually happened to some of these orphans was startling - not in a good way.
     
  26. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

    5,203
    1,025
    113
    I have such a book hangover today, after finishing The Book Thief last night.

    But like many a hangover brought on by liquid substances ... so worth it!
     
  27. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

    39,014
    6,748
    113
  28. BigB08822

    BigB08822 Well-Known Member

    20,818
    2,371
    113
    So good. I have been thinking about reading it again and I never re-read books. Problem is that I loaned it out to someone and don't know who. lol
     
  29. BigB08822

    BigB08822 Well-Known Member

    20,818
    2,371
    113
    Has anyone read Gone Girl? That sounds interesting. The plot twist intrigues me but I'd like if the rest of the book is good, too.

    I am unsure about The Book Thief being a movie. I have a hard time imagining how that translates to film and how they can capture all of the emotions in the book. I will watch and find out, though!
     
  30. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

    39,014
    6,748
    113
    There have been quite a few posts about that book in this and the other reading threads, but I can't swear that the twist wasn't revealed somewhere along the way.

    Agree about The Book Thief--but Geoffrey Rush as Death sounds promising.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.