New Book Thread because somebody' has got to do it

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by rfisher, May 14, 2013.

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  1. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    The Man Booker Prize long list is out. I was happy to see that my favourite book of the year so far (A Tale for the Time Being, by Ruth Ozeki) made the list -- my reads so rarely coincide with the Booker list.
     
  2. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    I really tried to get into that book - awesome premise, great descriptions. But, it got too quantum leap for me near the end.

    Oleada - I took the ending of "Life After Life" to be that everyone gets a 'do over' until you get it absolutely perfect. And the last chapter blew me away, it was like a box within a box within ..... :lol:
     
  3. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I am such a pleb. None of those books sound remotely interesting to me. Right now I'm reading Kathleen Gilles Seidel's "Summer's End" which I picked up because one of the characters is an ice skater.
     
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  4. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    I just finished reading a mystery by Clyde Linsley called Death Spiral because the mystery centers around a pair skater who is being threatened. Not a whole lot of skating content though. I get the impression that the author's research included spending a few hours at a rink and interviewing a coach or two. And some real-life champions were mentioned, the most recent being Tara Lipinski (the book was copyrighted in 2000).
     
  5. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    I loved this article (complete with pretty pictures):

    An Illustrated Guide to Buying the Classics

    I'm really getting into beautiful books lately. Of course I can't afford to buy as many as I'd like, but sometimes I just drool over pictures of them on the Internet!!
     
  6. TartanSk8ter

    TartanSk8ter New Member

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    Wyliefan, thanks for posting the article "An Illustrated Guide to Buying the Classics".
    I have some Folio editions, but now I'll look into the Penguin and Barnes editions. They are beautiful too!
     
  7. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    :cheer2: I joined the library that's about a mile from work - easy drop off and pickup. And I've already put a hold request in for everything that's on my 'regular' library hold list (they're still closed).

    E-reading 'The Oracle Glass', "a novel set in 17th-century Paris and Versailles, tinged with the occult and a feminist sensibility." Seems to be a YA novel, but it's not bad. (and I've already figured out which guy will save her at the end). :lol:
     
  8. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    Is it any good? I've seen it recommended in romance forums, but not by anyone who's an actual skating fan.
     
  9. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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  10. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    Wyliefan, I have a hold on this at the library. Looked amazing.

    Tonight I get to pick up "The Son" and "A Treacherous Paradise".

    Finished "The Oracle Glass" last night. Not a fan by the end. Lots of hand wringing by the 'heroine' about her one twu luv. :rolleyes:
     
  11. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    Oh good, I'll be interested to hear what you think of it!
     
  12. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    It's actually pretty good, more of a generational saga than a strict romance. The skating parts are dated - there's not that much of a professional circuit anymore - and the bits there are aren't technical so I haven't had negative reactions to them. The family dynamics are interesting - and the major focus of the book. But I like it more than I expected to. :)
     
  13. Nan

    Nan Just me

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    I've been reading some of G. A. Aiken's Dragon novels. I really enjoy the family dynamics and have laughed (out loud!) at many of the conversations between characters.
     
  14. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I've now started Susanna Gregory's Matthew Bartholomew medival mystery series with "A Plague on Both Your Houses." I don't know how I managed to miss these when they came out but it's nice to have a whole long line of books ahead of me.
     
  15. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    :cheer2: 3 books came in at the 'new library'. "The Obituary Writer", "Frozen in Time: An Epic Story of Survival" and "The Cruelest Month" (Louise Penny). And finally, "The Golem and the Jinni" is in after a 3 month wait at the 'other' library. I think I'll be busy this weekend!
     
  16. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    I burned through that one pretty quickly!

    :cheer: for libraries!
     
  17. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member

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    I'm winding up Indifferent Heroes and wishing that PBS should dramatize this series. Mary Hocking does a really good job of showing ordinary British families caught up in WWII. There are no gimmicks here - nobody is super-heroic/talented/beautiful/rich/whatever. To cop a phrase from Dorothy Parker, the characters "have souls and elbows." If you don't know people like them, you can easily imagine them. Well done, Mary Hocking.
     
  18. MikiAndoFan#1

    MikiAndoFan#1 Well-Known Member

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    Just finished reading Yrsa Sigurdardóttir's I Remember You; loved it! Definitely the scariest book I have ever read. I highly recommend it for those who like horror stories. :)
     
  19. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    And 2 e-book holds are in. :yikes: I'll be a giant eye reading books all weekend! :lol;

    Has anyone read "The Boy in the Suitcase?" That's one of the ebooks. Other is "Unnatural Creatures" a bunch of stories selected by Neil Gaiman. He wrote one of them too.

    Done already with "The Obituary Writer". Short satisfying read. 2 women, one who writes obituaries in 1919 (she'd survived the earthquake in San Francisco, but her married lover disappeared that day), the other an early '60's housewife who is dissatisfied with her husband and her life. I was hooked from page 1.
     
  20. TygerLily

    TygerLily Well-Known Member

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    I have and liked it quite a bit. I've been into mysteries, especially ones from Scandinavia, over the past year and a half if that gives any sense of my taste. I didn't like the sequel as much, but it kept my interest.
     
  21. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    I bought the series - at your suggestion - and am looking forward to reading them.
     
  22. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    I like that mental image. :D
     
  23. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member

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    :cheer: I hope you enjoy them as much as I do. But I'm a fan of the Virago Modern Classics in general. They've introduced me to a lot of great writers I might never have read otherwise - Emily Holmes Coleman, Barbara Comyns, Rosamond Lehman, Kate O'Brien, Sylvia Townsend Warner, Gamel Woolsey....and too many others to list here.
     
  24. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    Whoever upthread mentioned "Wool" by Hugh Howey, it's on Amazon's Daily Deal today for $1.99 (along with 39 other recent DDs). Just picked it up. Trying not to buy any other ebooks these days until I finish my stack, but I couldn't pass that one up.

    Started "Frozen in Time" last night, really good.

    Love the new library, there's another book in already. :cheer2: My 'regular' library takes months to get me a book, but the other is part of the county library system, if they don't have a book, they have 7 other libraries to check. I'm in heaven! :lol:
     
  25. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    Finished Ordinary Grace by William Kent Kreuger, and I'm going to say one thing: All Phantom fangirls (and yes, I'm one) should read it.

    I'm not going to say why. Go read it and figure it out. :D

    Seriously, though, it's excellent and I recommend it highly. Beautifully written, and full of well-drawn characters who aren't always exactly who or what you expect. And a central mystery that I didn't figure out until the very last minute.
     
  26. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    Wyliefan - I loved that one too! So well written. Loved the way the two brothers interacted, loved the town and all of the secrets in it, and loved the reveal of the title. And I was thrilled with the red herring suspects and the elegant ending.
     
  27. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    Those red herrings had me fooled! I didn't even come remotely close to guessing who really did it.
     
  28. Grannyfan

    Grannyfan Active Member

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    It was a surprise to me, too. After reading your post about The Light in the Ruins, I looked it up. It sounds good, but I ended up buying Skeletons at the Feast instead. Haven't started it yet, but it will be next.
     
  29. Sofia Alexandra

    Sofia Alexandra Well-Known Member

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    I finished The Long War last night. There are some pretty cool ideas and concepts going on, but as I put the book down I realised that I still don't care for any one of the characters. I'm not sure if I'll buy the next book in the series, I might just see if I can get it (in English) from a library instead.

    Next stop, The Ocean at the End of the Lane.
     
  30. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    Sofia - I loved "The Ocean at the End of the Lane". One of my favorite reads this year. Slim and magical.

    I finished "Frozen in Time" last night. It's about 3 military planes that crashed on Greenland during WWII. 2 of the planes were rescue attempts. Very annoyed at it. 75% of the book deals with the crashes and rescue attempts, the other 25% is a 2012 funding drive/expedition to bring back 3 bodies and a plane. My annoyance comes with the author inserting himself into the 2012 story. We see everything from his POV, instead of the Coast Guard personnel, or the families of the men, or the expedition leaders. And then they find the plane after tons of false starts, but are chased off by a storm - so it's still freaking buried. It's a book that could have waited until the story was over. I predict a revised ending. In the beginning of the book someone asks if he's Jon Krakauer. I think Krakauer could have done this story justice.

    Now reading Louise Penny #3 (The Cruelest Month). Finally getting the Arnot backstory. And I can't wait for #4. :)
     
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