New Australian Pattern Tests

Discussion in 'Moves In The Field' started by Aussie Willy, Mar 10, 2012.

  1. AusTechSpec

    AusTechSpec New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    189
    Great observations...

    The three turn patterns are that way as in general it is younger kids that would be taking that particular tests, who often do not have a developed enough body and leg power to keep the pattern and speed the whole length of the ice...

    This way they can still be tested on the skill of their turns alone...

    And your point on the novice patterns is spot on... doing turns that don't require held and controlled edges is much harder than in step sequences where often skaters fall from one turn to the next...
     
  2. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2003
    Messages:
    10,568
    Me too.

    I'm surprised that the primary focus for the Australian move is Power. On the comparable US moves it's edge quality and usually covers more ice with each lobe.

    Actually I think it's easier to achieve the edge quality with smaller lobes, and maybe better flow if it's acceptable for the lobes to retrogress a bit at the transitions. But I still don't see how it's a power move with such small lobes.
     
  3. purple skates

    purple skates Shadow dancing

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    16,536
    You want edge quality, you bring back figures. :p

    (I'm only partially kidding. :shuffle:)
     
  4. AusTechSpec

    AusTechSpec New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    189
    Only the first two patterns in Primary have a focus on power...

    The third and fourth ones that skittle were talking about are focused on edge quality....

    The idea behind these was to teach figure level quality without having to reintroduce figures.... Not quite possible I think, but these patterns should still increase overall edge quality...
     
  5. Bunny Hop

    Bunny Hop Accept no substitutes

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Messages:
    1,529
    There is also a Preliminary test which you must pass before you can test anything else at all (including dance). It's only plain forward and backward edges. It would probably count as the 'easing in' test in the sense of being the first formal test and being quite straightforward.
     
  6. AusTechSpec

    AusTechSpec New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    189
    Ahh yes I guess we all forgot about that one...

    The preliminary test has remained the same as it has been for the last couple of years...
     
  7. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2003
    Messages:
    10,568
    I was talking about the first pattern under Elementary, the alternating threes.
     
  8. AusTechSpec

    AusTechSpec New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    189
    my bad :p
     
  9. jenlyon60

    jenlyon60 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2003
    Messages:
    132
    Good observation. One of the things I've noticed since we rolled out the new MIF tests the other year is that quite a few of the skaters who weren't exposed to forward loops and forward twizzles in the old test structure (because they had passed through Intermediate or Novice before the tests changed) often seem to have more difficulty mastering (at least for test purposes) the back twizzle pattern (on our Novice test) or the back loop pattern (on our Junior MIF test).

    It's not universal and some of it depends on the coach and the skater, also.
     
  10. purple skates

    purple skates Shadow dancing

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    16,536
    I saw a coach, who is a decent coach but had never done figures himself, teaching someone how to do a figure eight and I was :yikes: . That is a big problem with the whole "we did away with figures but are now bringing elements of them back" idea (which, btw, I am all for). You have coaches out there - and lots of them - without the institutional knowledge on how they are supposed to be done, especially the loops. I hope the powers that be bring/have brought in some heavy duty training for the coaches.
     
  11. FigureSpins

    FigureSpins New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    2,062
    The US coach training was done in 2010, before the revised Moves were introduced. Every PSA and USFSA educational seminar/workshop I attended for over a year included a review of the moves with teaching techniques.

    The Eights were addressed, but the main concerns were learning all the steps and teaching the loops and twizzles for the other patterns. At all of them, the leaders specified that the skaters were not expected to demonstrate the precision that was Compulsory Figures. (Things like clean centers, overlaid tracings and even lobes weren't going to be as picayune as Figures.)

    The biggest bit of confusion is on the circle sizes. Each circle (not the entire pattern width) is supposed to be three times the skater's height in diameter. It's not in writing for the Waltz Eight, so only coaches who did Figures are "in the know."
     
  12. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    4,666
    USFS and PSA can offer all the training sessions in the world, but they can't force the coaches to go. The trouble is, the coaches who need the education the most are generally the ones least likely to attend.
     
  13. AusTechSpec

    AusTechSpec New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    189
    Which is the same thing that happens in Australia, I see the same coaches and judges making the effort to educate themselves at seminars everytime, while the ones who need it the most see themselves above such education....