Need MITF info for USFS

Discussion in 'Moves In The Field' started by Firefly123, Apr 30, 2010.

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  1. backspin

    backspin Active Member

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    Exactly!! Moves patterns are very precise & even down to which way your toes are pointing when the foot sets down (toward the boards/down ice/away from the boards etc). That's a lot of the stuff that the diagrams don't really tell you. Also the free leg position (while technically optional) usually has a "preferred" placement which you won't know about from reading the rulebook. Things like that.

    I didn't know you'd tried one of the moves tests before. It must have been pre-pre then? Do you still have the judges' comments? We may be able to help interpret them for you!
  2. danceronice

    danceronice Corgi Wrangler

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    Lol, you won't flunk! I *fell* on Preliminary (MAN, was I po'd--there were three of us testing the same time, I was on the three-turns, the other two girls were doing crossovers and came pretty close and I scared myself) but I just got up, the judge had me reskate that pattern immediately, I finished the test and passed.

    And pointy shoes are evil. That's how I got bunions. :(
  3. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    On my pre-bronze test I only did 1.5 circles of the forward figure 8, not 2. I had no idea until my coach told me before I started the next move (why he told me is a different matter.)

    They just had me reskate, and I think the reskate is why I passed- watching the video my reskate looks like how I skated at that time. My test looks like someone without knees skating- I was so stiff.

    I also touched down on the back inside edges once- I had never done that before, but I'm not sure the judge saw, she didn't comment.


    (I've also heard stories of upper level tests passing when the skater ran into the wall during the end patterns. The judge who told the story joked that the test was clearly passing anyway and running into the wall shows power- because their pattern took up more than the whole rink.)
  4. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    backspin,
    Yes, when I first switched over a few years ago I took Pre-pliminary MITF and FS and passed. Then, I took the Preliminary MITF. I thought I did ok, only one step out on a 3 turn, but I think it was the pattern thing that flunked me. (Back then, I did have a coach who signed me in but, I only took a few lessons from her and, admittedly didn't pay much attention to what she said about pattern placement.....But she did warn me. My bad. :( )

    No, unfortunately I didn't keep the sheets, but thanks for offering to help figure out what they're saying. :) ....It was something like "unacceptable placement of move" or "unacceptable pattern" or something like that....The coach said it was because I didn't do the turns on the right part of the waltz 8 and on one of the other items (power 3s?) I think I let the whole thing "drift" too far into the middle. (It has to go back out to the edge. The 3 turns were OK though. :) ...But not in the right place. :duh: Like you said, it is very percise. That was several (3?) years ago. I really must pay more attention this time. (Also they might not have liked that I took both tests together. I'm not saying this for sure, but the judges may have thought it was a little "cocky." Maybe. I'm not sure. :confused: ...But I am going to separate the tests by at least 2 months and take them at separate rinks this time.....Just in case. ;) )

    danceronice,
    Yes, it was those cute little pointy shoes. I used to love those low cut little pointy boots with the spiked heels and the pointed toes. Remember them from the 1980s (if you're old like me). Back in "the day" (high school) we would all wear them with cute lacy socks and mini skirts (a la zz Top). :lol: Back then I thought I looked really cool. :lol: I can't imagine dressing like that now (even if I could stuff myself back into one of those little lacy minis.) :yikes:
    Anyways, I am paying for it now. :(

    You are right about the bunions. Got those too. :( Also have a very nice pediatry surgeon whose children I will be putting through college. :rolleyes:
    Last edited: May 4, 2010
  5. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Skittl,
    For some reason, I did not get to reskate. (Maybe the flubby 3 turn where I put my free foot down was worse than I thought?) :confused:

    Thanks for giving me hope....:) With a wing and a prayer and the new lower average for Intermediate I just might get there. :D
  6. backspin

    backspin Active Member

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    I can pretty much guarantee that wasn't the case. It's not uncommon for people to take a couple of low level tests the same day. Higher level not so common, mainly because it's just much more difficult to have that much test-ready at the same time.

    Re. the no re-skate--since moves only gets one reskate, if the foot down on the turns would have been one, plus you had additional non-passing errors (like the 3 turn placement issues) you wouldn't have been asked to reskate because it wouldn't have put you up over the passing mark overall. They'll only ask for a reskate if that's the only thing that is keeping you from passing the test.
  7. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    backspin,
    Thanks. That is good to know. I doubt I will do this on MITF again. As everyone has said, I really need to get some instruction on each test, practice the patterns (not just the turns) etc..... But for freestyle, it would be easier for me to just take it pretty much all together (or in 2 sessions) once I get all the MITF passed.

    O.K., That makes sense then. :)
  8. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    Oh, well if you've already passed the prepreliminary MITF, you might want to consider sticking with the standard track. That way you'd only have to pass preliminary, prejuvenile, juvenile, and intermediate (4 tests) moves to get where you want to be.

    If you do the adult track, you'd have to do prebronze, bronze, silver, gold, and intermediate (5 tests).

    Would you want to avoid one more required test and having to test the same moves from pre-pre and intermediate on two different tests?

    Are are there specific moves from the standard tests that might give you trouble? By testing as an adult you would avoid some altogether (alternating threes and forward edge spirals on preliminary, back power threes on juvenile) or take them on a test with a lower passing average (eight-step mohawks and cross strokes from juvenile).

    The waltz eight is on the prepreliminary test, which you said you did pass.

    That move is not just about being able to do forward three turns OK. It's also about generating power with the turns, the crossover lobes, and the wide step between the lobes, and controlling the back inside edges and the pattern as a whole. So yeah, it takes more than just looking at the pattern in the book and vaguely approximating it on the ice. Then it depends how picky your judges are about the finer points of the pattern.

    But you're only allowed to reskate one move. So if one of them had an incorrect pattern and another had a touchdown, the only way the test could pass would be if the remaining moves were far above the passing standard and then they gave you a reskate on one of the ones that wasn't.
  9. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Oh, maybe it wasn't the waltz 8.:confused: I thought it was something in a circle pattern????

    I had planned to try to stick with adult tract and then cross over to Intermediate with the new passing average. It does add another test, but I just feel better about it being the adult tract. (Probably just a psychological thing.) :)
  10. Debbie S

    Debbie S Well-Known Member

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    LOL! When I tested Pre-Juv, I almost ran into the wall on the second end pattern of the forward perimeter stroking. I didn't actually touch the wall, but I did have to disrupt the crossover I was doing to make sure my free leg didn't hit the wall when I pushed outward (I basically just picked my foot up and stepped straight over my skating foot). 2 judges passed the move (both noted the near-miss) and 1 judge didn't - basically, their comments were all the same, but I guess some judges have a higher tolerance than others for near-misses, if the rest of the move is good.

    Yes, you basically have to be within 0.1 of passing. There are serious/fatal errors, like putting your foot down on a turn, falling, or not doing the correct pattern, that are automatic failure unless corrected in a reskate. Quality errors, such as skidding your turns, maybe doing 1 or 2 turns 'early' or 'late', or insufficient power or extension on a move, will cause the move to be marked below passing but don't automatically result in failure if you have another move (or 2) that were very good and can be marked above the passing level to put you at the passing total. You could be asked for a reskate to correct a quality error, if that would make the difference between passing and failing.

    When I tested Prelim, I put my foot down on 1 of the FO alt 3's (which I never do in practice, I was like WTF) and got asked for a reskate at the end. I had no other mistakes and had done the other moves at a passing level. I reskated clean, and passed the test. I've had a couple other tests where I thought I might get a reskate - these are the ones where the judges have a conversation at the end. But I didn't, b/c it was obvious after looking at my papers that only 1 judge wanted to see the reskate - I think at least 2 judges have to agree. Generally, if the judges don't need to see anything again, they just look at the judge-in-charge and quickly nod their heads, and dismiss you off the ice as soon as you get back to your coach, lol.

    Firefly, I highly recommend that if you want to pass the moves, you take lessons and listen to your coach. Pay attention to what they tell you about pattern placement and the lines/axes on the ice and understand what it all means - some of the terms you are using are incorrect. As backspin said, I doubt the judges thought you were "cocky" by taking 2 tests in the same session, but they probably didn't like how you disregarded the way the moves should be done. Skating is a tradition-minded sport with tradition-minded judges. If you want to advance in USFSA testing, you need to start following directions.
  11. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Yes, I guess that is the only way to pass the tests. I was kind of hoping to just skate ISI which has a um..."not so ridgid"...test structure. But, living in NY, there aren't too may ISI competitions around here. :( (It looks like it is much more active in the Midwest and South.) I did like the social aspects of the competitions (meeting new friends) when I was a teen (actually, a lot better than I liked the actual skating part.) It's kind of hard to see the other adult skaters at the rinks I practice at go off to competitons/nats etc. and I get left behind because I didn't take the tests. :(

    I guess it has really started bothing me lately because I put together a really nice routine for the ISI Platinum. (Granted, I'm not thrilled about "dancing" the part of the crazy clown...but that's another issue. :rolleyes:) The routine, iteself is....good. :) I think it would have done really well at Adult Nats but, of course, I'll never know because I can't skate because I don't test. :( Yup, it bothers me. :shuffle:

    Also, as a few posters pointed out. It's great to have an opinion, but if I'm not "part of you" (not even a USFS member, much less a "known" skater), then I've got no "street cred" so to speak. Even if I was, I doubt anyone would agree with me on certiain um...opinions...but at least I would have a bit more credibility......Maybe......;)

    So, I did test ISI and earned the right to skate in their competitions. Now I have to do the same with USFS. On a personal level I don't like the idea that skaters have to "earn" this right (they don't on roller)....But that is how it is on ice, (at least for now). ;) So I can choose to test or not. Like I said....it's been bugging me lately....:( Right now, I have a really great routine that few (if any) people are going to ever see. :( Of course, I guess I could video it and put it up on youtube, but it's not the same and getting cute stuffed animals thrown and applause.
    Last edited: May 4, 2010
  12. timing

    timing fragrance free

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    You definitely want to work with a coach as others have said to be sure the moves you are doing match what the judges are expecting. At her coach's recommendation we got my daughter a copy of the PSA Moves in the Field Book when she started testing. It not only shows the patterns it also discusses the expectations and the common errors for each pattern. She found it quite helpful. The 5th edition of this contains the new patterns which become effective on Sept 2, 2010.
    PeterG and (deleted member) like this.
  13. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    I am planning to sign up for an Individual USFS Membership in July. It says that I will recieve a U.S. Figure Skating Rulebook. Is that the same thing?
  14. danceronice

    danceronice Corgi Wrangler

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    If it's the same as when I joined it should include the patterns and a description of the standards...a PSA book is probably more detailed as that would be meant for coaches.
  15. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Oh...I see. So that's like the coaches' reference which would have more info in it. Cool. :cool:

    Yes, that sounds like a really good investment!!! (Especially since I only want to take the fewest number of actual lessons possible in order to pass each test.) I will definitely get one! Thanks!! :D
  16. timing

    timing fragrance free

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    They are not the same thing. The rulebook has the diagrams and a description but not the descriptions of common errors and expectations.
  17. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Did you get this book off the official USFS website? I'll definitely get a copy. :)
  18. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Update. I did manage to find this book on the PSA website. Do you know if I need to be a coach to order it?
  19. timing

    timing fragrance free

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    Someone else got them. I just paid.

    I did a google search and found that they are available from PSA online store and some other sites. The fourth edition is $10 and the fifth edition is $15 in the PSA online store. It looks like there is small extra charge for non PSA members.
  20. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    :DExcellent!! Will definitely get one. Thanks for letting me know about it!! :)
  21. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    Thanks -- I'll need to get the new one too.

    Someone else got me the previous copy.
  22. Purple Sparkles

    Purple Sparkles New Member

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    Here you can find standards and common errors for the new moves.

    Here you can find standards and common errors for the current moves.

    Diagrams and patterns and information for the new moves can be found here.

    Diagrams and patterns and information for current moves can be found in the test rulebook linked here.

    Hope that helps!
    gkelly, Stormy, purple skates and 3 others like this.
  23. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Purple Sparkles,

    Thank you for the links. :)

    I am going to try to get through as many of these things (MITF) as possible by Adult Nats. I think I have until Feb 1st. Will give it a try and see what happens (another foot surgery is scheduled for Fall, so this in going to be hard.)

    Queston: Do you think the judges are "harder" on adults who test the standard track MITF than adults who skate the adult track MITF? If I stay on the standard track I can take one less test (since I already passed prepliminary).
  24. Clarice

    Clarice Active Member

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    Yes, because of the difference in the passing averages between the tests. For instance, the Five Step Mohawk Sequence appears on the Adult Bronze and Pre-Juvenile MIF tests. The Bronze test has a passing average of 2.5, while the Pre-Juv test has a passing average of 2.7. The skater taking the Pre-Juv test has to do the move better in order to pass. Another example - there are several moves currently on both the Intermediate and Adult Gold MIF tests - the forward and backward power circles, the back double threes, the inside slide chasse pattern, and brackets in the field. To pass Gold, you only need a 3.0 passing average, but when you do them again on the Intermediate tests (the one adults take after they pass Gold), you have to get a 3.2 to pass.

    Of course, if you take advantage of the new "adult standard" that will go into effect in September, you get a .2 break on the passing average. In that case, there should be no difference between the tests. How that plays out in practice with different judging panels, though, is anybody's guess.
  25. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    I think that only applies to standard track tests intermediate and above though.
    For tests below intermediate the adult standard is the adult track.

    /could be wrong...
    Last edited: May 24, 2010
  26. Clarice

    Clarice Active Member

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    That is correct - I wasn't clear. The standard for the adult Bronze/Silver/Gold tests is already .2 below the corresponding standard track test, so if you want the "adult advantage" you take the adult tests. Starting at Intermediate, you'll be able to choose which track you're testing on.

    Of course, for those of us over 50, there will be the Masters option - .2 lower on the adult MIF tests, and .4 lower on the standard tests Intermediate and above.
  27. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    That's not strictly true.

    E.g., the bronze test contains moves from both the preliminary and prejuvenile standard tests, and the passing average is the same as preliminary.

    The silver test contains moves from prejuvenile and juvenile, and the passing average is the same as prejuvenile.

    The gold test contains moves from juvenile and intermediate, and the passing average is the same as juvenile.

    So for each of those tests, some of the individual moves have the same passing average on both the standard and adult tracks, and some of the individual moves have a passing average that's 0.2 or 0.3* below on the adult track than it would be on the standard track.

    *The difference between prejuvenile/silver and juvenile passing standards is 0.3, 2.7 vs. 3.0.

    Starting at intermediate, the exact same collection of moves will be on the test, with the exact same name of the test, and you'll be able to choose which standard you want to take the test at.

    Before intermediate they're completely separate test tracks with different arrangements of which move is on which test. You can choose which of those tracks to test.

    Or if you're a slow learner like me, you could choose to do both, testing most of the moves twice.
  28. leafygreens

    leafygreens Well-Known Member

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    Just wanted to throw in my 2 cents about passing averages. I took adult gold MIF and barely passed, then one month later took intermediate MIF and passed with lots of extra points. The judging panel was almost completely the same judges. I don't know how accurate it is that they give you lower scores just for being an adult, because that definitely didn't happen to me. But I also had a "bad" day on my gold test, and had a really "good" day when I took intermediate. The best thing you can do is be able to skate everything really strongly, rather than worry if you are .2 away from passing standard. The judges will look at you and be able to tell what level you are and give you appropriate scores in order to pass or not pass the whole test. They normally don't give too much above the average unless you are really amazing, so I wouldn't worry about it. I'd say unless you are really old, go ahead and give the standard moves a try if you make it past gold. If you can make it to the higher level MIF tests, then you probably don't skate timidly enough to need the .2 lower average anyway. That's just what I think - maybe others think differently.
  29. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Finally got back onto the ice. :) Tried some MITF. Wanted to put my head through boards to end the misery. :( :yikes: Ended up skating off and doing jumps before my head exploded. There HAS to be a better way......I'm working on a way to "ethically" participate in USFS, but avoid MITF. I want to go and have fun, too.....But I understand that there are rules.....If I can find a way to follow the rules, but still avoid (most) of the MITF, and not act unethically by skating an event under my level, but still participate (at least in a small way), then it would be a win-win. :D

    Working on this idea.....Thinking.....Thinking.....:shuffle:
  30. aster

    aster Member

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    You know, I don't really know any kid skaters at least who liked MITF. But there wasn't (and isn't) a choice -- if you want to compete, you get through the moves. My coach made me go through whatever test I was on, to her standards, at least once per session before I was allowed to jump or spin. I hated it, but once I passed my senior moves I never had to do moves again. If you're capable of doing the jumps you say you are, you should be capable of doing the lower level field moves. If you're not, then working on the moves will dramatically improve your jumps -- solid 3-turns (or mohawks), for instance, will make your flips much more secure. And now with IJS, you actually get points for things like rockers and counters and brackets, and you learn those through the moves tests. I know how hard it was to learn loops in order to put them in my footwork -- I can't imagine having to learn all of the turns required for a L3 footwork sequence without having learned at least some of them through the moves tests.

    Why not use moves as your warm-up every day?
  31. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Actually, I do..... Kind of....;)

    Of course, I don't just skate onto the ice and start jumping. I usually do all 3 turns (in both directions) and a few brackets (the ones that are easy for me) and counters and a rocker or two. Then some spirals and pivots. Maybe some chaines and slides (I just LOVE slides!!!!) :D Then I usually spin. After spins, I do flying spins and jumps. And, as you mentioned, of course there are basic 3 turns and mohawks to set up the items. So, yes, in a sense I do moves.....They are just my version which usually go in my own direction and which don't need to be in a specific ("picky") pattern on the floor. And yes, you are correct. Under ISJ there is definitely a emphasis on transitions into jumps and moves are definitely needed to get higher levels on footwork.....But under adult rules, (even ISJ), you can just choose a spiral sequence instead so the MITF aren't that critical. From what I've seen of the jumps (even at Junior/Senior level on youtube) two or three good, solid 2-2 combos would definitely even up the playing field there. So, although, I certainly agree with you about the MITF for standard, I really don't think they are that critical in this area for adult. (At least that's what it looks like to me from youtube. Admittedly, I haven't had a chance to actually attend adult nats. I'm hoping to go this year even if I have to travel. Maybe to skate. Maybe just to watch. Will have to see. Could change my opinion then. It's hard to tell anything just by watching youtube.) :)
  32. backspin

    backspin Active Member

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    You may find it less frustrating if you start right out w/ a couple of lessons w/ a coach who can give you pointers on how to make things easier. There are definitely 'tricks' to some of the elements.

    Which moves did you try? If you post some videos I'm sure some people here would be happy to give you some pointers.
  33. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    Firefly- it sounds to me like you only like to practice things you're good at. (Yeah- me too. Brackets are great fun on the ones I can do. Same with the moves I like- love running them. Hate doing the hard moves)

    But you know what- I do what's fun for me, because that's why I skate. I don't compete because I have no interest in continuing to hurt myself and pay out huge PT bills to work on jumps I don't care about. I work on the hard moves sometimes- I'd like to pass the next test, but I know it will be slow progress because I don't set aside the fun stuff and work on the stuff that needs to get done.

    For whatever reason, you seem to want to compete. And that means you can't just work on what's fun. You gotta do what the system requires.

    If you just want to do what's fun, join your club and participate in exhibitions. I even know of an adult who volunteered to be on her club's board to organize the exhibitions for the kids- and guess what, she gets to skate in them too. In an exhibition you can do whatever you want, no rules.
  34. kayskate

    kayskate New Member

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    I like to make up my own MITF. To keep it challenging, I use both directions. I think this is fun. For ex: I do a version of forward power 3s w alternating back xovers so I do a different direction 3turn direction in between.
    CW back xover
    CCW back xover
    RFO3
    CCW back xover
    CW back xover
    LFO3
    repeat.
    Can also be done w FI3s.

    A friend of mine went to a former show skaters who taught her some basic MITF type patterns w expression of arms and head. They are extremely pretty and variations on simple skills. I want to learn these too.

    I also enjoy doing basic dance steps around the rink on lobes like chasses, change edge swing rolls, etc. Backward and forward. It mixes it up and keeps things fun while I improve my basic skating skills. Depending on how adv you are, you can add twizzles, loops, brackets, etc. I like to change directions all the way around the rink so i don't do the same side for half of the rink then change. This keeps me changing directions and working on my weak side. i will also complete a pattern w a jump or spin. This gives me the feel of MITF into an element. If you compete, this will definitely benefit your choreography.

    W a little ingenuity, MITF can be a lot of fun.

    Kay
    www.skatejournal.com
  35. succubus

    succubus Well-Known Member

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    It's IJS, fyi.
  36. succubus

    succubus Well-Known Member

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    Amen, Kay - and if Firefly had read your journal, she would see that both MITF and dance made you a better skater, even though you already had mad skills. :respec:
  37. luenatic

    luenatic Well-Known Member

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    I do! A girl at my rink is really good at MITF. She just loves it. Most of her MITF tests were a whole point over the passing total. That means every element was at least 0.1 to 0.2 over the passing average. She learned and passed the senior MITF in 4 months with way above passing average. She is definitely an exception rather than norm.
  38. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Yes, I think that is the whole crux of the problem. If the MITF are so good for skaters and help their skating skills so much, then why force them on the skaters, (which is what they are doing by requireing them on tests)? I would think that skaters, themselves, would be desperate to take them in order to improve their jumps and spins. :confused: And, as many members mentioned, if you did't require them, then (most) skaters simply wouldn't do them. But then I guess it could be argued that if most skaters felt that way then maybe that is how the sport should evolve.....in that direction.....rather than enforcing a discipline to prop up an artifically imposed standard.

    Interesting observation: Is figure skatng a democracy? I have been advised to try to change the rules by getting others to agree with me. I have complained to more than a few parents, (not coaches, of course since they benefit financially by the present system), and many parents (and skaters) agree with me that MITF are unduly prohibitive. They even said they wouldn't mind signing a petition to see them made elective and remove them as a requirement for freestyle testing. How many signatures would I need? That is the problem. Even if I spend time, effort, and $ on a petition, (none of which I have), and got over 10,000 signatures and brought the whole thing to the USFS they would simply laugh and vote no.:lol: It is an oligarchy not a democracy. I guess that is where I get fustrated. :wall: And btw, I was actually suprised by how many skaters (and parents) hate the MITF and said they would be willing to sign my petition. I probaby could get a few thousand signatures in support of making it elective. Seriously. I could. :eek: But, as I wrote, what's the point.......:rolleyes:

    And I really do disagree about skaters getting hurt. Obviously, the more a skater jumps the more stress is put upon their body. That is true. But there are so many other factors to consider. The strength and physical make up of the skater. How much practice time he/she is putting in to begin with. The skater's weight and jump technique. I'm sorry, but there are just too many factors involved to arbitrarily say that taking out MITF is going to injure skaters. (Unless, of course, you want to support MITF. I have written term papers too. It's the old eating white bread causes violent crime because 97% of all inmates inprisoned for violent crimes have eaten it argument.) :rolleyes:

    But instead of insulting and arguing with me, maybe you guys should just consider this for a second. What is wrong with a choice? Especially at the adult level? Make MITF elective. If I get hurt, then, hey that's MY problem. I am an adult. I made my choice. There are enough adults that actually like the MITF and feel that it helps their overall skating that they will still take it. Why not make it elective at least the adult level? We are adults, after all. Choice is good. :D
  39. purple skates

    purple skates Shadow dancing

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    16,456
    This is incorrect. Good skating skills can make up for lack of jumping skills at the adult level, and good skating skills coupled with good jumping skills will give the edge to that skater over someone who doesn't have as good of skating skills.

    There's nothing wrong with choice. You have a choice. You can refuse to do moves and therefore not compete, or you can suck it up, do the moves and compete. Those are your options, and they aren't going to change. The only way I see the moves requirement disappearing is by having a figures requirement come back, and trust me - you would like figures even less than moves.
  40. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2006
    Messages:
    9,254
    Look at it this way: At least you don't have to do FIGURES!!!! :)
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