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Need help choosing a dog breed

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by ross_hy, Jun 13, 2013.

  1. BlueRidge

    BlueRidge AYS's snark-sponge

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    wow. Thank you for posting this.

    Please spay/neuter your dog or cat companion.

    @ross_hy Hooray for you! Good luck! :)
     
  2. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    One of the things we have to beware of around here is private "kennels" that sell puppy mill pups. I'd avoid any kennel or breeder that claims to have many different breeds of puppies available.

    I'd also suggest getting a locally-bred puppy - or at least within driving distance. You might need to contact the breeder somewhere down the road and if they're states away, that could be difficult.

    My last two dogs have been shelter rescues. One (aka Muttley) was from the Local Animal Rescue league and the most recent I found through Pet-Finder with the help of a college friend. I did research breeds but I didn't get stuck on any one. "Big, Black and Furry" was my criteria - and that's exactly what I got. :)
     
  3. cruisin

    cruisin Banned Member

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    Totally agree. I don't know why puppy mills aren't shut down. I walked into a pet store that sells dogs about 7 years ago. I was waiting for my Cav to be old enough to pick up from the breeder. I saw a little Cav in a cage, there. The poor thing was clearly sick. Physically and neurologically. It was snapping at flies that weren't there. Constantly. And it was shaking, underweight, not proportioned. It broke my heart.
     
  4. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I think people need to consider WHY they're looking at a specific breed. If it's because of allergies or temperment or to potentially show or breed the animal, then I can see going to a breeder and paying mega-$$$ for one. But it the reason you're only looking at Akitas or Burmese Moutain Dogs is because it looks cool or is the celebrity Pet-Of-The_Month, then maybe you should reconsider. When the movie "101 Dalmations" came out, suddenly every little kid wanted a cute spotted puppy. And six months later, the shelters were full of Dalmations who turned out to be too much dog for the family and were surrendered for bing what they were bred to be: big, happy, excitable, energetic animals.

    And even breeders aren't always reliable sources. One of my friends bought a pure bred Golden Retriever from a supposedly reputable breeder (although in another state) and, just in time for her young son to become attached to the puppy, has learned that the dog has just about every hereditary ailment at Golden Retriever can have. They're facing thousands of dollars in vet bills and the breeder has been no help at all - and asince the breeder is out of state, there seems to be little my friend can do.
     
  5. rfisher

    rfisher At least I still have Pairs to look forward to

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    What your friend should have done was ask for the health records of the parents. Really reputable breeders won't breed a dog with heritable health issues. Both of my Poodles breeders (of both the male and female) and my Akita follow all the puppies they sell for years especially if it was a new breeding. They wanted to know any health issues and any behavioral/training issues. I called both when Bella developed IMHA and let them know although IMHA isn't considered heritable. You have to check the "reputable" breeder as well. If they don't have the health records of the parents, then they aren't reputable.

    My Poodles and Akita both came from AKC show stock. My Akita's grandsire won BoS at Westminister. Both Poodles came from multiple champions including multiple types of champions (bench, companion, agility for the Poodles). While I wasn't planning to show them and paid a non-showing price for the puppies, I had information on multiple generations of dogs and breeders. I knew what I was getting with all 3 dogs.
     
  6. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I know that, but unfortunately my friend was a first-time dog owner (she got the puppy hoping to cheer up her young son after his father died last year) and didn't know what to do or ask. And now the breeder isn't responding to her at all - after telling her to return the puppy and she (the breeder) would have it put to sleep. Great thing to tell a little boy who loves the dog, huh?

    My great uncle bred show quality miniature pinchers; when he broke up his kennel after his partner died, we got five of them. Every one was different, even the ones from the same litter. One was a breed champion and the most well-behaved little dog I've ever owned. But the runt of the litter had the best personality. And his full sister put the B in B*tch, the exact opposite in every way. Having the five of them was what convinced me that "breed standards" are anything but. Never seen more varied examples of the same breed.
     
  7. cruisin

    cruisin Banned Member

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    I chose Cavs because I wanted a smaller dog that was not too delicate to play with (I grew up with a teacup Poodle - 3 lbs). Cavs have a well sprung chest, so they are not fragile at all. Temperament was critical, because I planned on having children. I researched many appropriate breeds, then saw a photo of a Cav and fell in love with those big dark eyes. That was 32 years ago, they were hard to find then. No celebrities had them because the were not AKC affiliated. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club wanted total control over breeding so that unhealthy dogs were not bred. But, the AKC made it difficult to show Cavs, so the CKCSC and the ACKCSC relented and joined. Since then, they have become very popular and shown up in puppy mills. I now have my 3rd Cav, just because I love the breed. They are pricey, and I did go for a dog (this time) with a grandma who was best in breed (opposite sex) at Westminster. Mine had a slight underbite with his baby teeth, so the breeder let me take him. That and the fact that he was my 3rd Cav. His adult teeth came in perfectly and he has beautiful markings. When the breeder saw him at a year, she told me that if she had known his teeth would be perfect, she'd never have let him go. She wanted me to show and title him, and she wanted to possibly breed him. But, we didn't want to do that. Cooper is a beautiful dog, with a wonderful personality.
     
  8. ross_hy

    ross_hy Active Member

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    Hi everyone! I've had a change in my situation and need some help.

    My schnauzer mix and I have been together for about two years. We did fine with my living alone and him staying inside all day because I could come home at lunch and take him out. However this week I'm moving and things are changing some. I will be in a house with a fenced in yard which is a plus. The drawback is I can't come home for lunch, it's too far. Anyone have tips for converting an inside dog to an outside dog? Should I even try (he's 6 years old)? I'd hate to give him up but at the same time I want what's best for him. Thanks!
     
  9. MacMadame

    MacMadame Cat Lady-in-Training

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    Dogs love to be outside. If you build some sort of structure so your dog can shelter if it starts raining, or as a place out of the wind when it gets colder, I think that will be enough.

    And your dog will be so happy that you moved because he'll be able to chase squirrels and sniff plants and run around the yard.
     
    ross_hy likes this.
  10. judiz

    judiz Well-Known Member

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    Is there any way to build a doggie door in your house so your dog can go in or out as he wants?
     
    ross_hy likes this.
  11. purple skates

    purple skates Shadow Dancing

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    Why would you want to make him an outside dog? That's not an ideal situation for any dog, let alone one who is used to living indoors.

    Is it just a question of you not being able to let him out at lunch? How long would he have to be in the house now before you get home?
     
    ross_hy likes this.
  12. ross_hy

    ross_hy Active Member

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    I'm hoping that's possible. There's a set of French doors going from the inside to the back yard. I'm hoping to get a doggie door cut into that.
     
  13. ross_hy

    ross_hy Active Member

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    I won't be able to let him out at lunch because the commute back to work is too far. He would be in the house from about 8 am until 6 pm. That's why he would need to stay outside. Doggie door is the best option if I can work it out.
     
  14. purple skates

    purple skates Shadow Dancing

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    That is a bit too long. Can you find someone to let him out during the day?
     
  15. danceronice

    danceronice Corgi Wrangler

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    As long as he has shade and shelter and water while you're gone, he'll be fine unless you're worried about theft. They are dogs, not hothouse flowers and it's not like he's going to be outdoors 24/7. There's nothing wrong with keeping a dog out for hours unless it's in direct sun or -30 temperatures, but I'd be concerned about someone coming into the yard and stealing him or just letting him out by accident (a meter reader, package, etc.) Just test the fence a LOT first (ie let him out while you're home and wait to see if he figures out how to get out of the yard. Fix that route, lather rinse repeat until you have dog-proofed the place) and think about a lock for the gate. If there's a way to set up a dog door AND he'll learn to use it, that would probably be ideal.

    Or litter-train/pad train him....I had to leave mine alone for a work day plus commute so sometimes as much as nine or ten hours. The two corgis pad-trained themselves and the older dog (who can't make it four hours sometimes) taught himself to use the actual litterboxes to pee in. Note though I have three dogs so company/stimulation isn't a problem.
     
    ross_hy likes this.
  16. vireo

    vireo Active Member

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    Last edited: May 26, 2015
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  17. Cachoo

    Cachoo Well-Known Member

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    Ross I'm so happy for your future companion: Let us know when you have him/her.
     
  18. Japanfan

    Japanfan Well-Known Member

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    Aren't French doors glass? And in that case, wouldn't it be difficult to cut a doggie door into them?

    Also, I don't know how well a dog used to being inside for most of the day would adjust to being outside for that same amount of time.

    If you can't create a doggie door, would a dog walker for mid-day be an option?
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2015
  19. Prancer

    Prancer All About That Bass Staff Member

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    Erm, some of you do realize that this thread is two years old, that ross already got a dog and that there is a new question, right?
     
    ross_hy likes this.
  20. ross_hy

    ross_hy Active Member

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    I don't know anybody where I'm moving, so having someone come over during the day isn't an option just yet. Plus I don't really have the $$ to pay somebody every day with everything going on with my new house.

    The adjustment from inside to outside is what I'm worried about most. My French doors are all glass but I've found a company that can cut a dog door into a French door. I just need to get an estimate and see how much $$$ it will be.
     
  21. Japanfan

    Japanfan Well-Known Member

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    ross_hy: if the price is too high, does that mean you would consider giving the dog up? You indicate that in your previous post:

    You must know shelters have difficulty re-homing older dogs, and that older dogs surrendered to shelters are often euthanized?
     
  22. ross_hy

    ross_hy Active Member

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    Giving him up would be the last resort. Even at that, I would try to do it with a rescue group rather than the municipal shelter. We're moving later this week, so fingers crossed everything works out OK.
     
  23. Japanfan

    Japanfan Well-Known Member

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    But isn't the dog door the perfect solution?

    I find it troubling that a person who can afford a new house might surrender a dog because a dog door is too expensive. That seems to be what you're hinting at - apologies if I'm wrong.

    Getting a dog should be a lifetime commitment. The only case in which I'd surrender a dog is if health issues demanded I do so, or I were dying. We rent in a city where it is hard to find rentals that take animals. If we had to move from here we'd camp out in our RV and look for a new place if we had to, rather than surrender our animals.
     
    alj5 likes this.
  24. alj5

    alj5 Well-Known Member

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    We are a schnauzer family (one of our dogs is my avatar), and love them. We have minis that are around 14-15 pounds. The two we have now we got from a schnauzer rescue. They were about 4 years old and have been with us for about 5-6 years. They do not shed, came to us potty trained, and both do well with our daughters who are 4.5 years old. Now that they're about 10 years old, they don't require much exercise anymore. They go for a walk each morning for about 15-20 minutes and they have the back yard to run around in. When we first got them, we were living in an apartment and they did fine. I will say they are a bit barky around new people, and were VERY protective over our twins when they were babies. One used to grab the pant leg of anyone coming in to see them as twins. Never bit into the skin, and never tried to grab anyone in shorts or a skirt, but still distressing as a pet owner. They both would sleep under their crib when they shared one (some ridiculously cute photos of our "4 girls"), and the former pant biter now sleeps with them.

    The rescue we used had a "trial period" of up to 4 weeks. They would take the dogs back within 4 weeks no questions asked. We were lucky enough to find these two who had bonded at the foster mom's house.
     
  25. reckless

    reckless Well-Known Member

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    Ross, your dog may go through some adjustment period, but leaving him in a yard is not necessarily a bad thing. When you're not home, your dog probably sleeps most of the time and he probably will do the same in the yard. You should make sure the yard is enclosed with a fence that he cannot jump over or dig under. If weather is a factor, make sure there is a sheltered area. If possible, before you go away for an entire day, do some practice runs where you leave the dog alone in the yard for 30 minutes, then an hour, then two hours, etc. That will teach the dog that you will return to the house, just as you returned to the apartment.

    You may have a problem with the dog barking when you leave, since it is a new experience for him. You might be able to prevent that by tiring him out a bit before you leave. Take him for a walk, throw a ball (if he fetches), etc. Consider also giving him some distractions for when you are away. For instance, there are balls that dispense treats as the dog rolls the ball around; it will keep the dog occupied for some of the time you are gone.

    Finally, don't make a big production about saying goodbye to the dog when you go to work. That can make it anxious and cause it to bark.
     
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  26. vesperholly

    vesperholly Well-Known Member

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    Oh come on. There's no need to guilt trip OP; she's clearly trying to find a solution.
     
    danceronice likes this.
  27. Spun Silver

    Spun Silver Well-Known Member

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    I think if you go with the outdoors route, it would probably be wise to register your dog with the town. My town requires pets to be registered, and it's a rule that AFAIK few follow, but an outdoor dog is going to bark and get attention, so it's probably better to CYA. There are heated pads you can get for the winter, also heated containers for food and water so they don't freeze.

    Or maybe you could manage a mix of dog-walker in the winter and outdoor arrangements in the other three seasons. Local vets are a good source for finding dog-walkers.
     
  28. judiz

    judiz Well-Known Member

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    Are there doggy day cares in your new town?
     
  29. ross_hy

    ross_hy Active Member

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    Update: I've been in my new town for a little over a week now. Winston came to town with my parents last Wednesday but the house wasn't ready. So he spent the night in the house while we spent the night in a hotel. It was good practice for him being by himself for that long, and he did fine. Once I got moved in, things were back to normal. He's been staying either inside the house or out in the yard all day while I'm at work. So far, he's been good and no accidents. I don't have the dog door yet so he's either in or out while I'm at work. The only estimate I've received on a dog door is $900 so I'm still searching for other options. Thanks to everyone who posted.
     
  30. Guinevere

    Guinevere Well-Known Member

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    I adopted a dog from a rescue two years ago. Like you I needed a hypo allergenic dog. He's a poodle mix. Not sure what the "mix" part is yet and I keep meaning to get a DNA test done. I've been told by various people he looks like a cockapoo or a malitpoo. Except the one thing they all agree on is that he's a bit bigger than those dogs tend to be (he's about thirty pounds and 15 inches at the shoulder). Most people say those mixes are smaller but he's my first dog so I don't know. He's just wonderful!! Everyone tells us we lucked out with him because he's quiet as a mouse (except when the mail lady shows, or there's police sirens, or a squirrel!!!) and he hasn't had an accident in the house. He was a stray in California, rescued by a rescue group in Oregon and then I found him online on petfinder. Drove 5 hours each way from Vancouver to pick him up!! He was a year old and people told us that was the best age to adopt because he's still very young but past the destructive puppy stage. We think he had some form of training though. He knew to signal us when he had to go out and would wait by the door. This was on his first day so we didn't train h to do that. So we figure he's been trained.

    He does however have some issues with being locked up. The first time I took him to get groomed and they put him in a kennel, he freaked out so bad he clawed at the door and made his foot bleed. I don't think that's normal because the other dogs didn't do that and now when I take him to be groomed he has to go in "express" where they don't lock him up. We wonder if he was literally abandoned. My uncle in California where Charlie was originally from said when the economy crashed so many people started abandoning their dogs. Like literally going to the park, opening the door to let the dog out to pottie and then driving off. He saw it happen to a little Pomeranian and the poor puppy chased the car then ran to my uncle for help. They took him in that very day and kept him. He was named Shadow because he was like my aunt's shadow, always with her.

    I have pet insurance on my boy because I've read procedures for animals can cost thousands of dollars and a visit to the vet automatically charges like a $50 fee. I used to have him groomed all the time but that costs about $90 each time so I leaned to do some trimming myself. Just not his nails though.

    I know we lucked out with Charlie but i always encourage people to adopt now. The thought of those sad dogs at the adoption made me want to cry. However, I would make double sure that you can handle it. Owner surrenders are the worst. The poor baby had a home one night and then is in the shelter the next.