Names You Will NEVER Give Your Children

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by Cachoo, Nov 1, 2012.

  1. cygnus

    cygnus Liberal Furry

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    But "Philip" has always been as common a spelling as "Phillip", although both are used frequently. Two "l" may be more common in the US than the UK though. I would imagine he would have to spell it whichever way was chosen.

    I dislike most "occupational names". Tanners had one of the worst, smelliest jobs ever- using urine (human and animal) and animal feces to cure smelly skins of dead animals. It was among the "lowest" medieval occupations, and is still pretty gross today, although the materials have changed for the better. I wonder if in the future kids will be named "Janitor" (not nearly as bad a job as a tanner!) or "Barrista"?
  2. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    They couldn't say the r and the l and r together was even worse. So they tended to call him OO-lick.

    Actually, in the US you can call yourself anything you like as long as you aren't changing your name to commit fraud. And that becomes your legal name. So he could just start spelling it with two Ls if he liked that better and that would become his name.

    Except historically these names came about because people only had first names. So if there was confusion about which Tom, Dick or Harry you were talking about, you'd add in "from Town Name" or "the Occupation". Over time, these names got shortened and the "from" and the "the" lost.

    Since we now all come with two names and sometimes more, I don't think that mechanism is still really available. New last names in particular these days mostly come from combining already existing last names. Which is going to lead to different kinds of horrible last names than occupation last names. :D
  3. cygnus

    cygnus Liberal Furry

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    I'm quite aware of how and why surnames came about - but these surnames are now given as first names, and I imagine many parents are just paying attention to the sound of the names, and not their meanings (which aren't too hard to figure out or look up!). Tanners and such were historically not well regarded, even if the work they did was necessary! I doubt that most of them are calling their kids "Tanner" and "Hunter" because they are family names in their own lineage- they just like the sound of them. And I know that "Barrista will never be a surname in our society- I was just making an analogy that those names would be the modern equivalent occupational names.
  4. taf2002

    taf2002 Well-Known Member

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    Btw, my brother loves his one L Philip name, & detests it whenever someone gets it wrong.

    ETA: my nephew named his son Cade which I guess was a made-up name since I've never heard of another.
  5. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    I think they are giving them as first names because they have heard them as last names and giving your kids a first name that used to be a last name is seen as being upscale somehow. I.E., it's something the rich do so I'm going to do it too.

    Therefore, since there is no mechanism to get Barista as a last name any more, how can it migrate into a first name once people no longer know what a barista is? Though I'd bet on Barista becoming a pretty first name for a girl sooner than I'd vote for Janitor for a first name (for a boy?) :lol:


    Cade is English in origin and the name peaked in popularity in the US around 2001.
  6. cygnus

    cygnus Liberal Furry

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    I don't actually think they will be given any time soon- if they are- it will be for the same reason as the others- parents like the sound of them and don't care for (or know) the meaning. And I do see Janitor as a boy's name, but then you never know do you? :)


    Cade is another surname turned first name- I always think of the peasant revolt Cade's Rebeliion in 1450, led by Jack Cade against Henry Vl. But that's probably not where the parents got it from, unless they are history geeks too? ;)
  7. pat c

    pat c Well-Known Member

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    Our niece named their son Hunter. I can't imagine what they were thinking. They must have liked the sound of it. There is not two people more disinclined to actually go hunting than these two. What were they thinking, and for their two daughters they named them traditional names ie Julia is one. And I also a know a Tanner. They'd be appalled if they actually thought about what they were naming their kid.
  8. moojja

    moojja Active Member

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    I know what Hunter and Tanner means and where the names came from. But if I hear the name, I don't associate it with hunting or tanning. I think it's someone who white, wholesome, upper-class, a bit snobby.
  9. pat c

    pat c Well-Known Member

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    You'd be right, except for the last 2, middle class and pretty low key describes them. :)
  10. falling_dance

    falling_dance The Scarlet Unlettered

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    "Cade Calvert" was the name of a very minor character in Gone with the Wind, but that's probably not it, either. I like the association with Cade's Rebellion much better.
  11. taf2002

    taf2002 Well-Known Member

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    No way are the parents history geeks. I thought I was one but I'm not familiar with Cade's Rebellion. And I read Gone With The Wind when I was a teenager - I forgot there was a character by that name. I've never known anyone with that surname.
  12. screech

    screech Well-Known Member

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    I briefly dated a guy named Sandy. Sandy isn't a bad name for a girl, but IMO just doesn't work for a guy.
  13. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    So how does it work for hurricanes? :yikes:

    So much of what makes a name "work" or not is culturally specific and/or personal taste.
    I hesitate to pass judgment on other people's choices; I can only say what I like or don't like.
  14. essence_of_soy

    essence_of_soy Well-Known Member

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    I remember in an episode of Sex and the City, Charlotte pitched a fit when she accused another woman of allegedly stealing Shayla, the name she had made up for her baby.
  15. PDilemma

    PDilemma Well-Known Member

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    My grandma's neighbors had a son named "Stacy". I don't like that for a guy, either. And I had a male student named "Tracy" once. Both girls' names IMO.
  16. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    The best possibility I can come up with is Cade McNown. Though I'm not sure if anyone would want to name a kid after him.

    Exactly. Sometimes a name will make no sense in a different culture, other times it will take on an unwanted meaning, or be associated with the opposite gender. For instance: Noa in Israel is a common girls' name, and whenever I come across any fictional/real life male Noahs, it's just strange for me to think of it as a man's name (the pronunciation of the Biblical name is different in Hebrew). That doesn't mean that people are wrong to name their children Noah. Or Noa. Another example mentioned earlier in the thread is the name Guy, which is quite common in several countries but might seem like a bit much for someone from the US.

    BTW, isn't Sandy short for Alexander?
  17. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    Usually . . . or Alexandra, or its short form Sandra, for a girl.

    But sometimes also used as short for a name like Sanford. Or just because someone has sandy-colored hair?

    Anyway, I find that name a little too angular to like for a girl, but I don't mind it for a boy. Or maybe my opinion is colored by the women I've known named Sandy, and vice versa.
  18. Lanie

    Lanie Well-Known Member

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    My aunt (by marriage) is Sanford, nicknamed Sandy. I always felt bad for her.
  19. skateboy

    skateboy Well-Known Member

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    Can't stand unusual spellings such as "Jordyn," "Kymberley," etc. Plus, it's just setting someone up for a lifetime of having to correct misspellings.

    On another topic, 30 years from now we'll have to deal with countless women known as "Grandma Tiffany." :scream:
  20. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    That's interesting because we're of a similar generation and I can think of a lot of guys named Stacy and Tracy who are quite masculine. I think of these names as unisex.

    Unfortunately have a common name with a common spelling doesn't preclude that. I have gotten so tired of correcting how people spell and say my name, that I've just given up.
  21. cygnus

    cygnus Liberal Furry

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    I knew a boy Stacy- short for Eustace. And a Couple of boy Tracys (not short for anything, as far as I know, although one went by "Trace".
  22. Simone411

    Simone411 aka IceSkate98

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    An ex-co worker friend of mine named her daughter Morticia Lucrisha. That was around 23 years ago. She said that one of her favorite shows was The Addams Family. Her daughter had to deal with this name all throughout high school. The daughter legally changed her name to McKala after she got out of high school. I cannot blame her one bit for doing so. To begin with, people should definitely think about what they're going to name their children and the concequences their children will have to deal with if they have such irate, unusual names. :shuffle:
  23. PDilemma

    PDilemma Well-Known Member

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    I don't think a name determines your masculinity or your femininity. Not at all. The boy named Tracy that I taught was a big burly football player. I just happened to have grown up with at least one Tracy and three or four Stacys around in every school. And they were all female.
  24. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate New Member

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    It is too bad Morticia Lucrisha wasn't happy with tisha, or tish, or lucy or lucky...any number of nick names! But to be another Mckala, Macayla, mikayla....
  25. Norlite

    Norlite New Member

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    How is that pronounced? the same as Michaela?

    I knew a guy in high school, big handsome guy, who was a late baby, had parents in their 60's in HS, who's actual name on his BC was Dani. Poor poor guy. He obviously always used Danny.
  26. Norlite

    Norlite New Member

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    Or yeah, I'd forgotten these had become alternate spellings........


    I actually think a lot of these spelling came about because some parents knew names, but had no idea how to spell them.

    I also knew a woman who loved the name Chantel, so named her daughter Shawntel. I always figured she never knew how to spell it or pronounce it correctly.
  27. skateboy

    skateboy Well-Known Member

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    Must drive you nuts, having so many people write "McMadam." ;)
  28. kosjenka

    kosjenka Well-Known Member

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    I went to school with a girl called Anamarija (common Slavic combination of Ana and Marija (Mary)).
    But weird part is that she is one of 3 sisters. Other 2 - Anabella, Anabellee.
  29. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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  30. Karina1974

    Karina1974 Well-Known Member

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    The Bookshop Sketch. I remember "Knickerless Nickleby" and "A Sale of Two Titties" were two of the titles. :D
  31. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    :rofl: I actually have a BIL named Ari Gold. I'm sure he's gotten all kinds of crap about it.
  32. screech

    screech Well-Known Member

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    It is... his birth name is Alexander, though he says he's never been called that - it's only used on his government ID but even for his job, he's listed as Sandy.

    But seriously, with a name like Alexander, 'Sandy' is the best short form his parents could come up with?

    One of my friends is named Lara, and she doesn't like the spelling of her name because people always pronounce it 'Lair-a' and she really doesn't like that pronunciation because it's supposed to be Lar-a (like Car-a)

    I also have a friend named Margaret. Nice, normal name. She hates it. But instead of being nicknamed 'Meg', or 'Maggie' or anything like that, she goes by 'Peggy'. Again, another case of 'that's the name you picked?'
  33. my little pony

    my little pony snarking for AZE

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    i have a friend who is younger than me named dorothy. her chosen nickname is dotsie. it sounds like someone in a sluggo cartoon.
  34. Alex Forrest

    Alex Forrest Banned Member

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    I always wondered how Peggy came from Margaret. Isn't Peggy's birth name Margaret Gail Fleming? I'm not a fan of the name Margaret. A friend at work named his daughter Margaret Helene. Loved the Helene part, the Marg part not so much. When I hear the name Margaret, I picture some obnoxious straight A ten year old tattling on her classmates.

    I love the name Alexandre. That would be close to the top if I had a son. I agree, with all the possible nicknames for this one, parents came up with SANDY??? Andy, Andre, Xander, Alex, Lex, etc. But to call their son Sandy?

    When my best friend had a daughter six years ago, I was honored to be the godparent. Not so honored to be given the task of naming her. My tastes run off-center and yet traditional. I submitted ten names, and they fell in love with Lilian Grace, and so it was. I knew they couldn't handle Athena, Aurora or Atalanta. hehe Well they had another daughter last year, and guess who they came to. But with a mature name such as Lilian, they couldn't possibly name the next daughter Debbie or Britney or whatever. Against my better judgement I proposed Vivien Hope. Another winner for them, except I was feeling like I was naming those two spinsters from the Waltons. The girls are nick'd Lily and Viv. Could be worse. But I feel somewhat responsible for the grandma-ing of names in the new century.
  35. danceronice

    danceronice Corgi Wrangler

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    My cousin Kim married a guy named Tim. I told them if they named their kid "Jim" I was coming out there to kick ass and take names, literally. (They named him Jack.)
  36. made_in_canada

    made_in_canada INTJ

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    My mom's name is Margaret, and she hates it too. Though that's probably because my her, my grandma, my great grandma, and one of her cousins are all named Margaret. At one point they all lived in the same house :yikes:
  37. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    My daughter is named Margaret. We never call her that. We actually named her Maggie but put Margaret on the birth certificate so she had some choices later in life if she decided Maggie wasn't a serious enough name.
  38. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    One of my college friend's mother's maiden name was Sandy Fish.
  39. SpiralGirl

    SpiralGirl New Member

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    Are your family of German origin by any chance? In Germany, Effi (albeit without the E) is a name in its own right and I believe that it can also be short for Elfriede. In England, Effi can also be short for Elizabeth. I first heard of it when reading the novel Effi Briest but it's also the name of the female lead in an English TV series called Skins. I think it's a really pretty name :)
  40. misskarne

    misskarne Spirit. Focus. Ability. Tenacity. Aussie Grit.

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    I think that's actually a male first name in Spanish. Dani Pedrosa, y'know.