Names You Will NEVER Give Your Children

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by Cachoo, Nov 1, 2012.

  1. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    There are plenty of names that are perfectly normal and acceptable for other people to name their kids but that I would never use because they're associated with religions I don't belong to. E.g., I would never name my child Christina or Muhammed. Or even something like Veronica or Madeleine.

    Nor would I name a child Mark, etc., after my mother Marcia -- I wouldn't want to celebrate war (Mars). On the other hand, I would consider naming a son Dmitri.
  2. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    I know a kid named McKenna, and I'm guessing it's a family name. Problem is, the kid is a boy (is it just me, or is that not one's first guess?), with long blonde hair and quite cute. I'm sure when he gets to school age everyone is going to think he's a girl.
  3. Twilight1

    Twilight1 Well-Known Member

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    Moses or Apple. No offense Gwenyth Paltrow
  4. loulou

    loulou Well-Known Member

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    Did you tell her missing consonants were making the job harder?


    It's not one of my absolute favourites, but Lolita is indeed a pretty nice name. Was it at the beginning of the book (sorry, I read it a long time ago) that Nabokov said - I googled it:


    I was in some highschool with brother and sister Sun Ra and Tantra. I was once introduced with brother and sister Blue and Strawberry.
  5. liv

    liv Well-Known Member

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    I think names are ridiculous if they have apostrophes in them. Those are usually used when letters are missing, like in don't for do not... so what is missing in those names? I also dislike names starting with La or Le... like LaShawn... it makes it sound French and not even the French do that unless it's a last name and has a purpose.
  6. Nan

    Nan Just me

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    The woman I shared a hospital room with when I had my third daughter was very soft spoken, so when the official came in to register her child's name, I don't really know what she said or how she spelled it, but the response from the official was, "Sweetheart, there has to be a vowel in there somewhere."
  7. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate New Member

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    The thing about a ' or a - in a name is that the government won't recognize it. My daughter's social security card has it off as well as other legal documents. I knew it going in. The - was to honor my best friend (she has a -) and she rolled her eyes and said WHY WOULD YOU DO THAT TO HER????? :D Also Gerber won't recognize it - you can get a free silver plated engraved spoon from them and they sent it without the -. So the La-a of the world are really just Laa.
  8. aliceanne

    aliceanne Well-Known Member

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    Oh I could see Mildred or Edna making a comeback. They were top of the list in the early 20th century, plus they have that ever popular unisex vibe. When I was school age Emily, Sarah, and Ava were considered quite dowdy. Robin, Karen, and Susan were the most popular names. I knew one Emily who always introduced herself by saying "I know, I know Emily reminds you of an old lady with a cat!".

    I always thought Dolores was a very dramatic name (Latin for sorrow).

    I don't think Agnes or Gertrude have ever gone away. There always seems to be one around.
  9. danceronice

    danceronice Corgi Wrangler

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    ROTFL....though technically, if she used Y a lot....

    I have used a lot of names I like (Marcus/Mark, Alan, Kevin, Josef/Joszef, Juliet, Elaine, Nadia/Nadezhda) on book characters and would feel odd using them on a child. (And yes, clearly, I prefer old-world names with old-world spellings.) I cannot STAND trendy names, or names that don't include a reasonable amount of vowels. Family tree names are problematic as some of them aren't English-speaker friendly, though I've always liked my great-grandmother's name (Michaelina, usually went by Lena) and the perverse part of me likes Stanislas as it doesn't get more Polish than that (though undoubtedly like my oldest uncle it would end up Anglicized to Stanley.) Also a fan of Abigail, Laura, Mary, and of Ian, Malcolm, John, and Michael. Rebecca is a good one, as I have a good friend named Rebecca.
  10. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    Really? So the government would consider Mary-Kate and Jim-Bob to be MaryKate and JimBob?
  11. KikiSashaFan

    KikiSashaFan Well-Known Member

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    I used to work at a job where you had to wear a name tag, and if you forgot yours you had to wear one that said Gertrude. No one ever forgot more than once :lol:
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  12. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    Actually that one I believe has a reason - as I understand it, the prefix le or la and I think also de is of African origins and means "of god" - thus the popularity among African Americans for names that begin with those letters. Given that it's technically a prefix, marking it with an apostrophe or hyphen makes some sense, rather than as a separate word, which can be confusing for forms and dbases. I think in the past it was usually just blended with the rest of the name, but I can see why it's become popular to highlight it given its meaning.
  13. cygnus

    cygnus Liberal Furry

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    Friends of mine named their daughter L'lyn (pronounced "Ellen"), which is not even the correct use of the apostrophe, as there is no missing letter between the l's. The poor child will have a rough time with her name, as computers often won't reorganize the punctuation, and nobody can pronounce it let alone spell it.
  14. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate New Member

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    Mary Kate and Jim Bob. They put in a space. So my daughter would be something like Mary Kate Elise Davenport instead of Mary-Kate Elise Davenport. She goes by Mary-Kate at school, on anything we write out.
  15. mkats

    mkats New Member

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    I remember we played a basketball team once that had a player on it named God'sGift (his parents were missionaries).
  16. skatingfan5

    skatingfan5 Well-Known Member

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    THey could have saved the poor kid some teasing and just named him Jonathan (which means gift from God), but I suppose they were going for something less subtle. :shuffle:
  17. Cachoo

    Cachoo Well-Known Member

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    So everyone called him King?
  18. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    You are lucky. Most of the Karens I know are beetches. :D

    As for the apostrophe, it's not just for missing letters. In other languages it's a glottal stop. And also sometimes just a pause.
  19. Badams

    Badams Well-Known Member

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    A friend of mine was determined to name his child Chinacat Sunflower. Thank GOD they had a boy first, and grew up before the girl came. LOL!
  20. julieann

    julieann Well-Known Member

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    I love how Oprah was born Orpah and since no one could pronounce it, Oprah is what they called her and she kept it. I doubt most would get it right anyway.

    I don't think Apple is anymore stupid than Penney or Paige. I just wouldn't name a newborn Bruce or Russell, it works for an adult but not a little baby.

    What about the parents who get so lazy they just name their boy 'Guy'?
  21. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate New Member

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    Okay I would never do a Chris Christopher, John Johnson, Michael Micheals. It's just...silly.

    And I would never choose Barbie or Ken.
  22. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    I don't know about Oprah specifically, but both Orpah and Ofra (which is how I had assumed she got her name) are Biblical names.

    If Guy's parents are not from English-speaking countries, I may be inclined to give them a pass. For instance, Guy is a very common name in Hebrew, it means dell or glen.
  23. KHenry14

    KHenry14 Well-Known Member

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    Much like teachers, us people who work in HR encounter weird names all the time too. The strangest I found was a guy who's legal name was Little Johnny Jones. I saw his birth cert. and it was actually Little. Needless to say he went by L.J. Jones as an adult.
  24. Sparks

    Sparks Well-Known Member

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    I knew a guy named Christian Christianson.
  25. KikiSashaFan

    KikiSashaFan Well-Known Member

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    I know someone named Emma that named her daughter Amy, but spelled Amme, so they could have matching names.
  26. danceronice

    danceronice Corgi Wrangler

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    Pronouced "Gee", it's also an old French name.

    Similar to Oprah, my friend is named Marium after a great-grandmother. They're not sure if the original name was INTENTIONAL, or someone misspelled "Miriam" in the family bible and it stuck.
  27. skatingfan5

    skatingfan5 Well-Known Member

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    :confused: I had never heard that explanation of this -- le and la mean "the" and de means "of" in French. Here is a paper ("Naming and Linguistic Africanisms in African American Culture") which contains some explanation of naming practices among African Americans (and links to similar traditions in Africa). Not sure how accurate it is, but it states that
  28. skateycat

    skateycat Minecraft Widow

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    I went to school with Tom Sawyer Finn and Tarzan Obadiah Greenberg.

    Mr skateycat wanted to name our son after any of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. I might have been okay with Rafael, but at the last minute, we found a name we could both agree with.
  29. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    I think Mariam is the Arabic variant of Miriam, maybe? I've met at least one Mariam.
  30. Marge_Simpson

    Marge_Simpson Well-Known Member

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    I posted this in another thread recently, but it applies here, so I'll repeat: a new mother at my hospital wanted to name her baby girl "Neisseria" because she heard one of the RN's saying it and thought it sounded pretty. She didn't realize the RN was probably talking about a Neisseria Gonorrhea culture. The nurse managed to talk her out of putting that name down on the baby's birth certificate.
    I went to high school with a girl named Candy Barr.
  31. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    I worked with a girl named Experience. I wouldn't name my kid that. Apparently she was descended from someone named Experience back in the 1700s when virtue names were popular. Not so sure Experience would be considered a virtue in all regards.:shuffle:
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  32. my little pony

    my little pony snarking for AZE

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    i know someone named travel. his mother hoped he would grow up to travel. he has not.
  33. skatingfan5

    skatingfan5 Well-Known Member

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    :lol: Certainly not now. It's a far cry from Charity, Faith, and Patience, but I think that I personally would prefer to be named Experience than Temperance or Reverence if it came to that. :slinkaway
  34. numbers123

    numbers123 Well-Known Member

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    These stories have been going around since I was in nursing school ~ 41 years ago. I would call them urban legends.
  35. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    I have a friend who claims to have taught brothers named Lemonjello and Orangello in dance school in Texas. I also have a friend who claims to have gone to high school with brothers named Lemonjello and Orangello, but not in Texas. There must be a lot of them or its an urban legend.

    I have a friend who swears he had a student named Female Penus (not "is"). Pronouced Feh-maw-lay Pen-nooz.
  36. screech

    screech Well-Known Member

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    My sister, who is pregnant with her first child, has always wanted to name 2 sons 'Huckleberry' and 'Finn'.

    A family member knew of a young, attractive, single female whose last name was Dick. The worst part: Her first name was 'Anita'. Yup, 'Anita Dick'.

    I'm a teacher, so I think that when I eventually have children, I'm going to try to avoid names of students. A fellow-teacher I know had parents who were teachers, and that was their main criteria in picking his name. They ended up with 'Kent'.

    I'm rather fond of the name Elsa - love that it's normal enough to to get raised eyebrows, but unique enough to not be the same as everyone else.

    I actually like a lot of the Scandinavian names, though one I could never pick is Hildegard. I knew one in high school and it made her sound like the stereotypical obese female opera singer with the viking horns on her head. Funny thing - she did actually have an operatic voice when she sang.
  37. mkats

    mkats New Member

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    Oh my gosh, we had a Hildegard at my practice. She was TERRIBLE and all the MAs dreaded working with her. We told our respiratory therapist once and he shrugged and said, "well, if I were named Hildegard I'd be a pretty unhappy person too." :lol:
  38. DarrellH

    DarrellH New Member

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    My grandmother's given name was Brazzie. Her sister was LaVada, and her brother was Freelin. Grandma named her first son, Stancil ... her first daughter, Lowell... and another daughter, Dixie. These were the names on the birth certificates, not nicknames.
  39. Clarice

    Clarice Active Member

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    La-a, Female, Lemonjello, etc. are urban legends. But there are still plenty of legitimately awful names out there. Check out www.bigbadbabynames.net.
  40. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    I knew I should have found the reference before I posted ;) and of course it was years ago and now I can find it. Searching now though I did learn that a) there are a lot of pointless baby name sites out there that are just lists of names, and b) the ones that offer origins and meanings looks like they were all copied from the same 2-3 sources, so who knows what's accurate.

    Many references to French, suggested connections to slavery in the south, but a lot of guesses too. Other sites say many of the same names are Hebrew in origin.

    Also found an article that studied unusual names, specifically in the African American community, and often the explanation had nothing to do with culture, history etc, and everything to do with "we liked the sound of it" and we spelled it differently so that our kid would stand out and be unique.

    At this point, I'm inclined to chalk it up to fashion. :lol: