More tornadoes in Oklahoma- any fsuers in Kansas, Oklahoma, Iowa, Missouri?

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by Vash01, May 20, 2013.

  1. milanessa

    milanessa engaged to dupa

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    To be fair the news outlets I watched (CNN and NBC) only reported what state officials told them. They broadcasted the interviews where those numbers were announced.
     
  2. victorskid

    victorskid Skating supporter

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    The number of 51 last evening came directly from the Medical Examiner, Amy Elliott. I heard her speaking by phone to CNN and give this information. She was one who corrected the numbers in a news conference this morning. Apparently there was some double counting/confusion yesterday.

    At the time she gave the 51 number she also said she had been told to expect about 40 more. I presume that's where the number of 90 came from...
     
  3. judiz

    judiz Well-Known Member

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    Please update me on the situation at the elementary school, were they able to locate all the children who were in the building and if so, how many survived?
     
  4. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    This summary article has the most current numbers, and links to more information:
    http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/22/us/oklahoma-tornado/index.html

    ETA: I believe that the reason for the survival of many of the children at Plaza Towers Elementary was that bystanders began digging them out of the rubble; and making a "human chain" to get them to ambulances and rescue personnel.

    More important developments:
    http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/22/us/oklahoma-tornado/index.html
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2013
  5. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    Hi all--

    Just a quick update. Pastor and family are fine :). Coworker who lost house was actually in the home when the tornado hit. She went into the closet with her two dogs, and could hear her home collapsing. When the tornado passed, she opened the door and found the closet was the only thing left standing in her home. Total miracle she's alive and unharmed. Another coworker lost his house, but is unharmed. And a third coworker's niece and nephew were in the elementary school that collapsed. Her niece suffered only a broken arm even though she was in the part of the school worst hit. The nephew suffered multiple broken bones and internal injuries, and was just put on life support today. Because of all the debris, the ambulance couldn't get to the kids, so the parents picked them up and carried them over a mile to get them medical attention. We've taken up a collection for all those affected, and I've been working on securing supplies for first responders and those displaced. A friend of mine is in the national guard, and he's being called in. He took a bunch of donations we raised and used his military ID to get through the checkpoints and drop them off.

    Someone asked about basements, and in OK you won't find many. I asked a building contractor about this once, and he said it's because of the soil. OK has hard red clay soil, and it's very difficult to dig through. So the cost of putting in a basement in OK is high, and isn't recouped in the added value it gives to a home. So unless a home is custom built to include a basement (very rare), a house won't have one. Schools here don't have any basements or safe rooms. Kids just stand in the hallways or bathrooms, or any room without a window.

    Lots of folk are pulling together right now which is good. But someone made a comment that Moore was just one town hit--the other towns that were completely obliterated have received no press at all, and very little attention. So anyhow, I'd just pass on that a lot more folk besides those in Moore are displaced. Sad thing is Moore is likely the only one to be guaranteed to be rebuilt. The other towns will likely be on their own :(.

    As alexeikuguchi mentioned, power has been out for some counties, and some water plants were hit meaning no water for many as well. Internet and tv wasn't available for us in the immediate area till the next day, and then it was iffy a bit. Things are ok now :). And the weather today is beautiful!!!

    Anyhow, thanks all for your prayers and support and weather info--it was much appreciated!
     
  6. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the update, agalisgv.
     
  7. Southpaw

    Southpaw Saint Smugpawski

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    After living for a week without electricity after Sandy I can say that living without water is much worse so I really feel for the people who are without it right now. I felt incredibily lucky to have had water, the situation would have been pretty unbearable without it.
     
  8. alexikeguchi

    alexikeguchi Active Member

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    I was also near the affected area yesterday bringing supplies. I tried to drive by the house of a teammate of my son since I knew it was right in the path, but it was in the restricted access area. From where I was, though, I was able to see the theater and another large building which was extensively damaged, and I only later realized that the other building was Moore Medical Center, where I have actually worked on occasion in the past. Surprisingly given the patchy service, I was able to get through to the friend's mom by cell, and she said that they were just packing up what they could (fortunately no items of sentimental value were lost), were going to have to walk out of the area to meet their ride, and were going to be put up in a hotel for the time being. House will need to be leveled and rebuilt but was still upright. Most of the neighborhood was flattened. There are many more families in the club left homeless, and we have been organizing an additional collection for them. Sadly, a little boy from one of the younger teams was one of those lost in the Plaza Towers collapse, and there will be a memorial for him Friday.
     
  9. cruisin

    cruisin Well-Known Member

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    That is unfortunate. Most houses here have basements and the ground is solid rock. Many basements have to be blasted out. In a place so prone to tornadoes, it would seem that basements could save lives.

    Sending good wishes to everyone in OK.
     
  10. FigureSpins

    FigureSpins New Member

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    I have several family members in OK, two in Moore. They were all lucky - my 80-something cousin said the tornado passed about a mile south of his home. They have electricity and Internet, so they've been posting updates and ways to assist. Sadly, some friends lost a son in the school collapse. People are posting photos that they've found on Facebook, asking people to share the images to try and find the owners. There was a couple in the hospital after just having a baby, a wedding portrait, and other milestone photos. One person found a digital camera and pulled off a photo to share, in the hopes of id'ing the owners.
     
  11. topaz

    topaz Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure building/digging a basement is more expensive than the F5 storm shelters(above and below ground) available to build or purchase in Oklahoma? From what I understand they cost a few grand but add value to a home. Hopefully some folks will look into this as an option for themselves and neighbors.
     
  12. FigureSpins

    FigureSpins New Member

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    From my cousin, who actually DID build a home in the red clay of Oklahoma, a basement isn't worth the cost or trouble. (They would have had to use explosives to remove the soil for the dig.). They are accustomed to dealing with tornadoes, so most buildings are pretty safe, but the tornado that sat on those schools was powerful. As one person put it, they'd have to build a fortress to withstand that much power. Kids would be in prisons with no windows for the other 264 days of the year.

    Those shelters are pretty pricey. I think most of the houses were built with hurricane closets, or safe rooms as part of the design. My house has a huge, walk-in closet on the first floor that a original owner said served that purpose, per the original builder rep. (We have the same house, but reversed - their garage is on the right, mine is on the left.)

    Several of her friends remarked that they feel people are being overly critical and making claims without sufficient know.wdge or justification. Most people are supportive of disaster victims, yet for some reason, OK isn't getting that treatment. I guess because of the kids who were hurt/killed at the school, people have limited sympathy. I remember feeling that the woman whose young boys drowned during Hurricane Sandy was at fault. She chose to drive a distance along the shore road with the intention of crossing the VZ bridge during a hurricane because she wanted to go to Brooklyn instead of the perfectly good shelter less than 2mi. From her home. Yet, no one questioned her choices, but everyone in OK is being criticized and second-guessed at every turn.

    Since hindsight is 20/20, I can only hope that any rebuilding is done with higher codes.
     
  13. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    Homes here are at a substantially lower price point than where you are. It's really not an option for most here to just pay another $50,000 or so for a basement. Just to give a sense, people live in Moore because it is is significantly cheaper than Norman (which it borders), but has lower crime and better schools than Oklahoma City (which it also borders). Adding on tens of thousands of dollars to the cost of a house puts it out of the price range of many Moore homeowners. If they could afford more, many would be living in either Norman or Edmond.
    Very true
     
  14. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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  15. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    Re the basement issue: According to an interview on NPR, basements have typically been a liability rather than an asset for several reasons: (1) heavy clay soil (2) very high water table, which meant leaks, leaks, leaks (until more recent technical gains in waterproofing methods) and (3) the rarity of a storm of this magnitude (F5, ie>200 mph).
     
  16. cruisin

    cruisin Well-Known Member

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    I don't follow that. You said that homes in OK don't, typically, have basements. Do homes in Norman and Edmond have them? We don't pay extra for a basement, they just dig a foundation and the house has one. It just seems that basements would be a safety factor in an area with tornadoes.
     
  17. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    You don't pay extra, but the basement is part of the cost. The cost up build them in an area where you have to dynamite, not dig, would be extraordinary. And they'd leak because of the water table. That's why we didn't have them in Texas.

    In Iowa most people have some sort of basement (ours is a half bc it walks out) but I know a very few who went with slabs because it greatly reduced the price.
     
  18. jeffisjeff

    jeffisjeff Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, in areas where having a basement is the norm, slab houses are sometimes considered "cheap."
     
  19. rfisher

    rfisher Satisfied skating fan

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    A large percentage of houses damaged don't even have home owner's insurance much less be able to absorb the cost of digging expensive basements that leak. Those who live where basements are common don't understand the geology and geomorphology of the soil in other parts of the country. Moreover, basements aren't the answer as everything above falls down into the basement. You have to have a separate underground storm shelter and most houses don't. They are little concrete bunkers with a door. Personally, I'd have to see the funnel cloud coming on a direct path before I'd go in one. I don't think I've ever seen one in a subdivision. Most people who have one are in rural areas. Trying to make community shelters is a good thought but really impractical. Storm chasers and Doppler radar can give about a 15 minute warning if you're lucky. You may have time to get to a shelter if you are within a couple hundred yards. And, the reality is out of every tornado watch, the percentage of tornados that form and touch down are very small. Most people don't get concerned until the sirens start going off meaning it's on the ground. Then you have minutes to act. Everybody expects a warning to be nothing like most are and are truly surprised when it turns out to be the real deal. Been there, done that many, many, many times. And, as Agal has said, people outside of Moore were impacted. They just got the TV publicity.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2013
  20. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    They use sirens more liberally now, for thunderstorm warnings too. Anytime winds are I think 70 mph, even just bursts. To me, it is crying wolf. It used to be tornado on the ground, go now. Now it's more like "stay away from windows". We use a weather radio because the street sirens have become meaningless. Thunder lets me know there is a thunderstorm! Tell me if there is a tornado!
     
  21. rfisher

    rfisher Satisfied skating fan

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    I was on call once and on my way home when the weather radio interrupted in the car to say a tornado was on the ground on the highway I was on. They didn't say where. I was yelling at the radio to just tell me where! If you're at right angles to the path, you're OK. I just kept driving and went home.
     
  22. Garden Kitty

    Garden Kitty Tranquillo

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  23. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    I guess it depends on where you live, but here the sirens mean a tornado has been spotted (ie, funnel clouds have visibly formed). For just a tornado watch or storm, there is no siren. But as rfisher said, funnel clouds form very frequently here, so people don't rush to safety just because the siren is sounding. Most folk will go out and survey the sky and horizon to see what's headed their way before hunkering down.

    It's pretty rare for strong tornados to his major cities here. Generally it's the rural towns that bear the brunt. In short, what rfisher posted :)
     
  24. Simone411

    Simone411 Just Flip-Flopping Around

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    From one of my news feeds, Universe Today; Hi-resolution satellite views of the destruction from the tornado.

    http://www.universetoday.com/102379...-destruction-from-the-moore-oklahoma-tornado/

    It's the same where I live. It's pretty rare for a tornado to hit in my area, but on occasion, they have hit. A tornado touched down in my back yard in 2009. It snapped a large pine tree in two and it fell on top of my utility building. It sounded like a freight train, and I thought it was coming straight for my house. I was very lucky that it didn't get me and my home.
     
  25. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    Much of the area seems as though it were bombed.
     
  26. topaz

    topaz Well-Known Member

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    delete
     
  27. topaz

    topaz Well-Known Member

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    This is what I was referring to earlier in the thread. Above ground shelter I think it referred to a F5 safe room and the concrete cellar is the F5 storm shelter.

    I wonder what the the percentage of homes in the areas hit have F5 safe rooms or F5 storm shelters? From what I understand FEMA is "suppose" offer some type of rebate if a homeowner builds/constructs a safe room or safe shelter.
     
  28. Sasha'sSpins

    Sasha'sSpins Well-Known Member

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    My thoughts and prayers are with the victims who were in the path of these terrible storms. For any fsuers in those areas my heart and prayers are with you! Please stay safe!

    I know Texas can get hit by those monster tornadoes too. I'm worried about my nephew. He enlisted in the Air Force and just went to Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. Do you know if that area is relatively safe? I served in the Army at Fort Sam Houston there years ago but all I remember is very hot weather in February/March.
     
  29. BigB08822

    BigB08822 Well-Known Member

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    San Antonio doesn't have a very high risk of tornados. Doesn't mean none ever hit the area but its no more than most areas of the U.S. San Antonio, at least the last 10 years or so, has been quite dry and misses out on the big storms.

    We have warnings here all the time and the problem is that our listening area is so huge that the tornado can literally be a few hours in any direction away. So most people do not take them seriously. I've also had my specific neighborhood listed as being in the direct path of a tornado and nothing has ever transpired. I think they go by radar a lot and there is never one on the ground, just the potential (which should be a watch but the NWS has odd requirements).
     
  30. Simone411

    Simone411 Just Flip-Flopping Around

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