Local idioms

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by Bostonfan, Feb 3, 2012.

  1. smurfy

    smurfy Well-Known Member

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    Born and raised in CT, live here now, but have lived in Los Angeles and the Twin Cities.

    I have never heard of bubbler. New England has many areas with differences.
    Soda is in CT and CA, but Pop is in MN.
    Packy is short for Package Store in CT - liquor store (state law requiring the alcohol must be wrapped.
    As a kid (in CT) a neighbor married a guy that had a daughter from a previous marriage that visited every other weekend that I played with. She was 1 year older than me and used the word wicked often, and I thought she was cool. I assume she was from somewhere in Ct, but not really sure.
    In CA, the freeways are called 'the 5', 'the 405', but in CT 'take 91 N to 84W'...
     
  2. Angelskates

    Angelskates Well-Known Member

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    Aussies call them Bottlos, but I think we'd call them Packy if they were called Package Stores :lol:
     
  3. ChelleC

    ChelleC Well-Known Member

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    I'm originally from eastern Kentucky. Soft drinks are called pop, or referred to as a pepsi. Doesn't matter what kind you have, it's a pepsi.

    We also use "catty-corner."

    The evening meal is supper, not dinner.

    Shopping carts are buggies.

    Mamaw and Papaw for grandparents.
     
  4. Kruss

    Kruss Not Auto-Tuned

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    I forgot that I once ordered soda in a restaurant here and they brought me seltzer water.
     
  5. Moto Guzzi

    Moto Guzzi Well-Known Member

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    Ghost farts (but that's not a regional thing, just family weirdness).

    When I lived in the midwest I bought pop and brought my groceries home in a sack. Now I buy soda and get bags at the grocery store.
     
  6. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    My father is not a college grad and he has always said "soda".

    -Bridget
     
  7. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    I am Chicagoland born and raised and I've never heard it called a "bubbler" locally.

    -Bridget
     
  8. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    Funny, slip-ons mean those little ballerina flats around here :lol:

    -Bridget
     
  9. julieann

    julieann Well-Known Member

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    It's more regional than educational, I have a couple of degrees and still say pop.
     
  10. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    I see a lot of "soda" and "pop" mentions on this thread... growing up, everyone in my family said "pop" because we're in Chicagoland -- except for my dad who has always said "soda" because he's an Ohio transplant :lol: Other phrases we say differently are: we say "garbage can", he says "trash can", we say "basement" and he says "cellar" (well, not so often anymore, even he says basement more often than not -- we've gotten to him!). Regional phrases are fun to learn about :)

    -Bridget
     
  11. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, that was kind of what I was pointing out. Thanks for the backup! I think "pop" is a fun word and knowing it's from the Great Lakes region is cute :)
     
  12. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    Even the Midwest has differences, it is a pretty big region, afterall... in my neck of the Midwest, we say "bags" for paper bags, never "sacks"! But, we do say "pop". We do use "sack" once in awhile for a lunch packed in a small paper bag. I never use it myself, though. A "sack" to me is made of fabric.

    I also say "front room" and "living room" almost equally, though in houses with two such rooms, it's very common to call the one in the back the "family room". I think "family room" has been around for like 20 years, but when I was a kid and first heard it, I always imagined a family rec room in the basement :lol:
     
  13. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    Another one: my dad used to call a hamburger a "sandwich", which we never did; a sandwich to me is used for tuna fish or ham and cheese -- but he calls them "hamburgers" more often than not now; again, we've gotten to him :lol:

    My grandfather was raised in Chicago itself and he had expressions we didn't use in the suburbs. He would say, "chuck it" for "throw it out/away".

    I know in MN as well as where I'm from we say "scoot" for "move", as in "scoot over so I can sit next to you", or "scoot, you're in the way!"
     
  14. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    Oh, he lives around here?

    And you live around here, too?

    We should all meet!

    Pop is more common in Ohio than soda. Cellar is another term I haven't heard since I left the farm; you either have a basement or you are on a slab. If it's inside, it's a trash can, outside it's a garbage can.

    Never heard anyone call a hamburger a sandwich, either. What part of Ohio was your dad from? :huh:

    People here say "chuck it" pretty regularly, too. Also "pitch it."
     
  15. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    Hey, Prancer, you offered anecdotal evidence, and I did the same. What's the prob? :confused:
     
  16. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    Aside from the fact that I specified that I was referring to usage "around here" in the case of pop and soda and education levels, which I did because I am aware that this is not widespread, nothing :confused:. Just offering more anecdotal evidence in response.

    I wondered where your dad was from because Ohio has four distinctly different accents and some idioms that go with them. One of the things you said makes me think he's from northeastern Ohio, but "cellar" is kind of throwing me.
     
  17. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    Dad's from the Toledo area, so northwestern OH.
     
  18. julieann

    julieann Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure where 'around here' is...if you are talking Minnesota, no I move to Arizona 5 years ago.

    Here's a funny Pop vs. Soda Page across America.
     
  19. OrioleBeagle

    OrioleBeagle Active Member

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    I'm from Maryland. While visiting a cousin in Iowa, I asked a grocery store employee where the "soda" machine was. They looked at me with a very confused look on their face. They finally figured out I wanted the "pop" machine!
     
  20. OrioleBeagle

    OrioleBeagle Active Member

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    People from the City of Baltimore refer to going to Ocean City, Maryland as "going down the Ocean".
     
  21. John 3 17

    John 3 17 Well-Known Member

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    I should add that my grandfather more than likely got "chuck it" from his Irish parents (I've read Irish books with the expression in them), but with so many Irish in Chicago, sometimes there's no difference between something from Ireland or something from Chicago :lol:
     
  22. Lurking Skater

    Lurking Skater Ms Lurker if you're nasty

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    I've lived in southern Illinois all my life and have never heard of a bubbler, it was always a water fountain or maye a drinking fountain. The large, decorative fountains are just called fountains. We have soda down here. It become pop somewhere northern in the state.
     
  23. Wiery

    Wiery Well-Known Member

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    I live in Alabama, and a lot of people here say "I"m fixin' to..." instead of "I'm going to," or "I'm about to..."

    ...and I have heard the term "bubbler," but it was specifically in reference to my 8 year-old's bathtime activities.
     
  24. stanhope

    stanhope Active Member

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    The Midwest does have a wide range of idioms. I grew up saying "pop" and "sack" instead of "soda" and "bag." Also, in some areas of the Midwest you bring a "casserole" to a potluck and in other areas you bring a "hot dish."
     
  25. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    I use tiff and void all the time, and my husband has picked them up too ("the cat is voiding around upstairs," and "I'll be home at 6:30 so there's time to get tiffed up before we go out").


    Actually it's two syllables - Traw-no or Traw-na :) That is how natives pronounce it, as well as our neighbours across the falls.
     
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  26. Susan1

    Susan1 Active Member

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  27. Susan1

    Susan1 Active Member

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    Now that so many fast food restaurants have self service "pop" stations, I just order a medium drink (and get the cup). If you are at a sit down restaurant, you order the specific thing off the menu. And if I'm not looking at a menu, I think I usually say "What kind of soft drinks do you have?". But in general terms, I call it all "pop" (Ohio). On my grocery list I will write "decaf pop".

    (p.s. I'm a "grammartician", and I still forget how to use punctuation marks with quotation marks!!!)
     
  28. AnnieD

    AnnieD Active Member

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    I'd say "chuck it" or "chuck it in the bucket" to throw something away. Don't know if it's a Scottish or Irish thing!
     
  29. cruisin

    cruisin Well-Known Member

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    Usually, here (NJ) we say sprinkles, but jimmies is acceptable too.

    I think lovely with sarcasm is pretty universal. There are lots of superlatives that can be used with a sarcastic tone that end up meaning the opposite of what their definition is.

    I don't know if that is so much regional, as it is old fashioned :). My grandmother said catty corner, my Mom did sometimes, but you rarely hear it said anymore.

    I would say stylist, that's what they are. How about beauty parlor as opposed to salon? Again, I think beauty parlor is just an old fashioned term, salon is more current.

    I think words like that are typically college words. "Ralph", "blow cookies", "pray to the porcelain Gods" - all things I first heard in the dorm. :lol:


    I'm with Prancer on this one - trash can or waste basket in the house, garbage can is the big one (in the garage) for outside pick-up. We say basement. To me cellar is an older term or used for an underground storage area - e.g. wine cellar.

    Chuck it is not common here, but if you said it, it would be understood. I say scoot over. I just think it sounds nicer than move over :).
     
  30. emason

    emason Well-Known Member

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    Cellar may be more common in New England; almost everyone there has a cellar. No one has a basement.