language quiz

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by gkelly, Jun 12, 2014.

  1. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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  2. pollyanna

    pollyanna Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting. They guessed Norwegian as my native language, and English (England) or Welsh (UK) as my English dialect. I live in Kentucky. :lol:
  3. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. My results were:
    1. Welsh
    2. Australian
    3. English / England

    I do have a Welsh background but it's a couple of generations back, and I haven't spent enough time there to have an impact on my language. I did however spend some of my childhood in Scotland -- but I guess that didn't have enough of an influence on my speech.

    I'd be interested to know if "Canadian" ever comes up in that list!

    It did think I was a native English speaker, though (followed by Norwegian and Hungarian -- huh?).
  4. jeffisjeff

    jeffisjeff Well-Known Member

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    My results:

    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:
    1. American (Standard)
    2. South African
    3. Singaporean

    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:
    1. English
    2. Norwegian
    3. Dutch
  5. Impromptu

    Impromptu Well-Known Member

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    Canadian came up on my list - my dialect results were:
    1. American English
    2. Canadian English
    3. Ebonics

    And my native results were:
    1. English
    2. Norwegian
    3. Dutch

    FWIW, I live in Minnesota, which probably explains the Norwegian influence (although I did spend the first half of my life in West Virginia).
    Gypsy and (deleted member) like this.
  6. Kasey

    Kasey Loving on babies!

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    Dialect:
    1. English (standard)
    2. Canadian English
    3. Singaporean

    Native results:
    1. English
    2. Norweigian
    3. Vietnamese
  7. jeffisjeff

    jeffisjeff Well-Known Member

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    So anyone know what the difference is between American (Standard) and American English?
  8. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    But I have zero Norwegian influence and it came 2nd in my native language results too. I'm guessing it has more to do with how well Norwegians speak English -- so if English is the 1st guess, the 2nd guess would be a country known for their fluency in English as a second language.
  9. ballettmaus

    ballettmaus Well-Known Member

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    It certainly is interesting. They guessed American, Singaporean or Canadian as my dialect and their first choice of my native language was English. Then German (which would be correct) then Norwegian. I'm guessing those are the countries they think speak the best English outside the English speaking countries?
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2014
  10. gkelly

    gkelly Well-Known Member

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    Or have the most similar grammar?
  11. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:
    1. US Black Vernacular / Ebonics
    2. American (Standard)
    3. South African

    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:
    1. Norwegian
    2. English
    3. Dutch
  12. Gypsy

    Gypsy Thunder & Lightning!!!

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    Wow...interesting. My results were the same and I live in Minnesota too!!
  13. Habs

    Habs Well-Known Member

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    For dialect, I got

    1. Canadian
    2. Scottish (UK)
    3. South African

    For native language, I got
    1. English
    2. Norwegian
    3. Swedish
  14. Prancer

    Prancer Ray Chill Staff Member

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    American Standard is more prescriptive than colloquial, which I guess is what they mean by American English. For example, you are more likely to say something like "He is the man who" instead of "He is the man that."

    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:

    1. American (Standard)
    2. Singaporean
    3. Canadian

    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:

    1. English
    2. Dutch
    3. Chinese

    I wonder what I marked that made them think I might be Chinese or Singaporean :lol:.
  15. Simone411

    Simone411 aka IceSkate98

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    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:
    1. American (Standard)
    2. Canadian
    3. Singaporean

    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:
    1. English
    2. Norwegian
    3. Swedish

    Well, it was pretty interesting. I'm afraid I don't know what the difference is between American (Standard) and American English.
  16. kosjenka

    kosjenka Well-Known Member

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    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:
    1. US Black Vernacular / Ebonics
    2. Singaporean
    3. English (England)

    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:
    1. Polish
    2. Greek
    3. English

    US Black Vernacular / Ebonics? :lol: I dont even listen to hip hop, rnb or rap!
  17. rfisher

    rfisher Satisfied skating fan

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    LOL it wouldn't have anything to do with music, but with grammar and sentence construction, especially pronouns. Those are the biggest differences between English and many of the Romance languages and are the most difficult for non-native speakers to learn--going both ways.
  18. shirokjj

    shirokjj New Member

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    Oh this is interesting.

    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:
    1. American (Standard)
    2. US Black Vernacular / Ebonics
    3. Canadian

    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:
    1. Norwegian
    2. English
    3. Dutch

    I live in NY and my native is Chinese lol
  19. snoopy

    snoopy Team St. Petersburg

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    These were my exact results as well (I'm in northern Ohio). Since ebonics seems to be overlapping with Norwegian/Dutch, I wonder if there is a relationship there.
  20. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    I got this

    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:
    1. American (Standard)
    2. Canadian
    3. US Black Vernacular / Ebonics

    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:
    1. English
    2. Dutch
    3. Norwegian

    English is my first language. I don't know the difference between American (Standard) and American English, so sure, why not.
  21. kwanatic

    kwanatic Well-Known Member

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    English dialect
    1. American (Standard)
    2. Canadian
    3. South African

    Native
    1. English
    2. Norwegian
    3. Swedish

    I live in Atlanta, GA and have lived in the south my whole life.
  22. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    Well, bizarro. At least #1 is right in both guesses. I know not a lick of Singaporean, Swedish, or Dutch, and I'm from the US. I grew up 3hrs south of Vancouver, BC--maybe that accounts for the Canadian dialect guess? I tend to think that this is simply a poorly designed quiz.
    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:

    1. American (Standard)
    2. Singaporean
    3. Canadian
    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:

    1. English
    2. Norwegian
    3. Swedish
  23. snoopy

    snoopy Team St. Petersburg

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    Really? I think this may be one of the best designed quizzes ever posted here.
  24. Simone411

    Simone411 aka IceSkate98

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    LilJen, I can't speak Singaporean, either. Therefore, I have no idea why mine lists American (Standard), Canadian and Singaporean. I can understand American (Standard) and Canadian, but I'm clueless regarding Singaporian.
  25. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    Fascinating - American was the second guess for me, which makes sense because obviously as a Canadian I have been exposed to American culture my entire life - so that begs the question, for you Americans getting some Canadian in there, is the influence of all of us Canadian FSUers? :lol:

    I also got Singaporean as a third guess, and I'm guessing it's because I spend a lot of time working with people whose first language is not English, and thus international English sounds normal to me. They pretty much nailed it on my native language too, with the influence of my immigrant parents and how they spoke English.
  26. Aceon6

    Aceon6 Get off my lawn

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    I got similar results, just with South African and American switched on the dialect and with English, Dutch, Norwegian as the order on the native language.
    I'm guessing there is something about New England grammatical standards that is throwing them off.
  27. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it is saying you speak whatever language is there. It is trying to guess what your language is. So it is guessing first what version of English you speak and second- what language you spoke first.

    For the most part, it seems to be guessing Americans correctly as speaking American English. So of course the second and third guess aren't going to make sense. Only one can be right.
  28. kosjenka

    kosjenka Well-Known Member

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    Music was the only source I could think of. My first language teachers were all British and I watched a lot of Cartoon network. Later I had American as a teacher. I am auditory type when it comes to learning, which is why my Italian teacher from Pescara was so against me going to Sicily to "ruin" my Romanese Italian :D

    I like how English was on the list of my possible native language.

    in a description there it says "Speakers of US Blank Vernacular are more likely to accept he be working. "
    I remember those examples, and they are not something I would use/write/say.

    I am glad I took part in this overall.
  29. Simone411

    Simone411 aka IceSkate98

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    Well, I have some French heritage, and living in Louisiana may be where the Canadian comes from. I wasn't surprised by that.
  30. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    For those questioning Singaporean, I don't think it's a language per se - Singapore is a place built from three main cultures (Malay, Chinese, Indian) and heavily influenced by centuries of trade and very much an international city now, and therefore the English spoken there is what one might call international English, with a mishmash of other languages thrown in. There might be a local creole that combines various languages that the quiz is calling Singaporean, but I think it's just a form of English - same as Canadian, Scottish, American etc.
  31. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    But the second and third guesses do make sense in the context of how you speak American English, and what other forms of English or other languages influence the way you speak and what sounds right to you.
  32. Prancer

    Prancer Ray Chill Staff Member

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    Er. prepositions are usually the hardest things to learn, not pronouns. Preposition use in most languages is mostly idiomatic and so very hard for non-natives to master.

    If you got any of the Teutonic languages, it most likely has to do with noun placement, and if you got Ebonics, it's verb tense use. Not sure about the Asian languages and I don't have a linguist handy to ask.

    I am not sure why people are surprised at the other languages they are getting. You can only get English or American or whatever once :lol:. I would guess that the dialects are all close to American English in some way.

    ETA: Wiki to the rescue;

    Though S[tandard] S[ingaporean] E[nglish] is based on British English, it increasingly displays traits of American English due to influence from the media. Certain grammar rules are derived from American English - for one, SSE tends to favour collective verbs taking singular verb agreements, as compared to collective verbs taking plural verb agreements in British English. The phrase 'The government is…' is thus more commonly heard than 'The government are…'.

    And that directly relates to some of the grammatical structures that were offered in the quiz.

    I believe that Chinese English is primarily British, too (at least based on my Chinese students). And both of those would relate well to American Standard English, which is more prescriptively correct than American colloquial English and thus closer to British English.
  33. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    LOL indeed! I do think one of the biggest flaws in the quiz tho is to lump all of "American" or "Canadian" together. There were a lot of answer possibilities I recognized in the quiz as being common sentence structures for the Maritime region of Canada, particularly Newfoundland, and I'm guessing parts of New England would be similar. Proposition usage in particular. I didn't mark any of those as being "correct," but if I had I'm sure I would have received a more Canadian mark.
  34. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    I got exactly the same as Skittl1321

    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:
    1. American (Standard)
    2. Canadian
    3. US Black Vernacular / Ebonics

    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:
    1. English
    2. Dutch
    3. Norwegian
  35. Tinami Amori

    Tinami Amori Well-Known Member

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    Good quiz..... but weird results for me...

    English dialect
    1. English (England)
    2. Scottish (UK)
    3. American (Standard)

    Native
    1. Greek
    2. Romanian
    3. Swedish

    I was born in Russia, lived in several European, Latin American and Asian Countries for at least 6 months. My more or less current residence is in USA/Calif.
    The examples of some phrases given in this quiz are not exactly the phrases I would use, but they were grammatically correct so I checked them.

    There is a confusing element for me in this quiz: just because one CAN recognize the correctness of a language structure in another dialect, is not a determining factor for that person's own dialect or influences. Just means the person knows ABOUT other dialicts...
  36. escaflowne9282

    escaflowne9282 Well-Known Member

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    Our top three guesses for your English dialect:?

    1. American (Standard)
    2. Singaporean
    3. Canadian

    Our top three guesses for your native (first) language:?

    1. English
    2. Romanian
    3. Vietnamese
  37. danceronice

    danceronice Corgi Wrangler

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    1. American Standard
    2. Welsh (UK)
    3. Canadian

    1 and 3, okay (I'm from Michigan and watched as much Canadian children's programming as American TV) but Welsh?

    Native language:

    1. English
    2. Norwegian
    3. Swedish
  38. leesaleesa

    leesaleesa New Member

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    Same here, except Louisiana and Florida. No English, Norwegian, or Swedish in my family tree. Both sets of Grandparents spoke in arcane dialects-Eastern KY by way of Greece and Turkey, and French Cajun.

    I assume it came out that way because we know when to use regional dialect, and when to use Standard English.
  39. kwanfan1818

    kwanfan1818 I

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    Dialect:
    1. English (standard)
    2. Canadian English
    3. Australian

    Native results:
    1. English
    2. Norweigian
    3. German

    English is very commonly taught and spoken in Singapore, and is even spoken at home by native Chinese speakers.

    I was surprised when my old boss told me he was from Singapore, because he sounded like he was born in Philadelphia. He told me that almost all of the teachers in his school spoke British English (accent, usage), but his favorite teacher was an American, and he was determined to speak like her, even if he was sometimes given grief by his classmates, and her accent and usage wasn't reinforced by any subsequent teachers.
  40. ballettmaus

    ballettmaus Well-Known Member

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    I have no idea if German and Norwegian are similar in grammar but German, next to Russian, is said to be the hardest European language to learn because of its grammar whereas English is said to be the easiest. That makes me think the grammar isn't that similar.