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Ebola Outbreak in West Africa

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by FGRSK8, Jun 22, 2014.

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  1. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    I am not a virologist. Theoretically, I would guess it's possible but so unlikely as to make the officials comfortable enough to bring the patient here. Again, I am encouraged that he arrived on his own two feet and not on a stretcher.
     
  2. cruisin

    cruisin Banned Member

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  3. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    That would make the virus airborne and it isn't. Again, I am confused.


    I didn't see the tent he was in, but am guessing it's a negative pressure environment.
     
  4. Lacey

    Lacey Well-Known Member

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    Dr. Kent Brantly is in Atlanta, he walked into the hospital. His wife is there too. They are thrilled that he was able to walk.
     
  5. NinjaTurtles

    NinjaTurtles Teenage Mutant

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    They're protecting against droplet transmission, not airborne transmission. The concern is fluid getting directly on someone via sneezing/coughing, not travel via airborne particles. The subtleties between these two methods of transmission are often confused by the media.
     
  6. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    So there is aerosol transmission? Then why is it compared to HIV and Hep B when it is more like say, pneumonia?
     
  7. FGRSK8

    FGRSK8 In Search of a Lost Chord

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    The CDC has been storing the small pox virus for decades so I am sure they will treat the Ebola virus with the same respect.
     
  8. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    Wasn't some smallpox just found randomly in a closet?
     
  9. Anita18

    Anita18 Well-Known Member

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    I worked in a molecular biology lab for 7 years. The news didn't surprise me, especially if they were from the 50's.

    When projects shift, you get lazy about going through the stuff you worked on. I mean, it's smallpox so they SHOULD have done a better job with it, but if it had been 50 years, I'm not surprised that it was forgotten.
     
  10. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    I am sure they've been storing Ebola and Marburg and what not as well but I think this situation is different. The virus is not exactly contained in a test tube. I am still trying to figure out whether there is aerosol transmission or not.
     
  11. Holley Calmes

    Holley Calmes Well-Known Member

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    I heard on the news this afternoon that they do not believe the Ebola virus will mutate to airborne. They said it has not morphed in any way since 1978. It's still the same virus, so they don't expect fast changes. Of course, there are many who worry that the genie is out of the bottle. I'll just trust the Emory people. My Dad lives just a couple of miles away....
     
  12. leesaleesa

    leesaleesa Active Member

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    The Reston subtype (which is not a zoonotic) acts by aerosol transmission, but the other sub strains haven't showed the capability to spread that way. A researcher in Porton Down was infected years ago after a needle stick, and they were able to contain it. I think it was right after it was isolated, and not much was known at that point. The researcher recovered.
     
  13. once_upon

    once_upon a time there were numbers.....

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    I assume that we learned from SARS or HIV or any other communicable disease. One should error on the side of caution vs. the perhaps we should have in the future.
     
  14. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    SARS and HIV have different transmission modes. You cannot contract HIV from a sneeze or from contact with sweat. I am wondering what the situation is with Ebola.
     
  15. once_upon

    once_upon a time there were numbers.....

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    I am aware of that. My comparison was that in the 1980's we were not using universal precautions with any contact with blood/body fluids. In 1990's the lack of using universal precautions was part of the issues the outbreak of SARS in the Toronto hospital. I don't think that one should make any assumptions or panic because of use of precautions against any mode of transmission, it is just common sense based upon what we have experienced with other communicable diseases.
     
  16. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    These were what is known as additional precautions, not just universal precautions.
     
  17. cruisin

    cruisin Banned Member

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  18. nubka

    nubka Well-Known Member

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    :eek:... :scream::scream:
     
  19. Jimena

    Jimena Well-Known Member

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  20. cruisin

    cruisin Banned Member

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    Last edited: Oct 23, 2014
  21. NinjaTurtles

    NinjaTurtles Teenage Mutant

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    Because it's not really aerosolized, these are large droplets they're trying to prevent contact with (e.g., someone coughing right on your face or touching a snotty tissue and then your mouth). Large droplets with a short range of transmission. CDC and WHO's recommendations for transport of infected individuals are always pretty extreme. The PPE they suggest can be more than totally necessary. In a case so visible like this, assuring the public that you're taking every possible precaution is something that plays in the CDC's mind.

    Although, I believe there is some evidence to suggest that it can go airborne between pigs and monkeys. That came out in a journal a few years ago, and I haven't read or heard much about it since.
     
  22. UGG

    UGG Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone been able to confirm how these two individuals contracted the virus? From what I read, they were never around any infected patients without their protective suites on...has this been addressed?
     
  23. cruisin

    cruisin Banned Member

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  24. FGRSK8

    FGRSK8 In Search of a Lost Chord

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    As unsettling this news about Ebola is, the reality is that humanity is always under the gun from a pandemic of some sort. It just a matter of time before one gets going. The two big ones now are the H5N1 and the H7N9 both bird flu viruses with mortality rates of between 30-45%. Now these viruses are hard to spread, but I know the CDC is worried about the prospect that either one will mutate and become as transmutable as the less virulent H1N1.
     
  25. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    Thanks for clarifying. I did read the study about the pigs and monkeys.
     
  26. cruisin

    cruisin Banned Member

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    Last edited: Oct 23, 2014
  27. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    For the same reason we don't get animals' diseases, for the most part. I am going to guess that the animal-borne virus cannot bind to human cells the way it is structured now. For a virus to infect a host cell, it has be bind to the cell's surface like this: http://media.npr.org/assets/news/20...-54119140a4b6f78aca7f18e984698835487e05cd.jpg

    The spiky round things are the virus and the smooth larger spherical things are the host cells in that pic. So the current monkey/pig virus likely cannot attach itself to the human cells--doesn't have the right surface molecules (I forgot if it's surface proteins or another molecule that has to match the cell's surface).
     
  28. cruisin

    cruisin Banned Member

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  29. Anita18

    Anita18 Well-Known Member

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    Well anything's technically possible, but we have a pretty good idea of what's likely. I'm not an expert on surface molecules, but I wouldn't be surprised if we had a catalog of all possible surface molecules capable of binding to human cells. After all, we know perfectly well what surface proteins HIV binds to - there are other reasons why a vaccine has never worked, but it isn't from lack of knowledge on that front.

    Maybe the mutation to airborne is too much of a jump to make it unlikely, and that's why they're not too worried about it if it hasn't happened already.
     
  30. Garden Kitty

    Garden Kitty Tranquillo

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