Does rollerblading wreck your ability to figure skate?

Discussion in 'Moves In The Field' started by Bunny_Hop, Dec 11, 2010.

  1. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    I once borrowed a friend's normal inlines/rollerblades and found them really fun. It felt like skating (I love the feeling of skating).

    I was wondering whether using rollerblades just for normal stroking and maybe some crossovers would damage my ability to figure skate. I wouldn't get the "figure" rollerblades like PICs because I don't want to use them to actually practise figure skating, just for fun. I think I'd find a good-quality second hand set of rollerblades and might remove the heel brake because I've heard it feels strange to figure skaters and is unnecessary if you can do a t-stop.

    I also wondered as a side note whether spending some more time doing skating-like movements might increase my strength and, more importantly, confidence (which is my main obstacle in skating...).

    Thanks!
     
  2. Ozzisk8tr

    Ozzisk8tr Well-Known Member

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    No it shouldn't affect your ice skating. Yes do all the excercises off skates too, it's all training muscle memory. Also, pic skates are by no means the best figure inlines. I don't think anyone at the recent world roller championships wore them.
     
  3. Aussie Willy

    Aussie Willy Well-Known Member

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    The difference I have found between watching those on ice and those on rollers is the way the skaters use their knees and ankles. I am fortunate to some times see the World Inline and Roller Champion Jayson Sutcliffe get on the ice and he is fantastic on both. But his knees and ankles are a bit stiffer than if he were an ice skater because of the differences in the way both types of skaters push.

    Jayson had considered becoming a figure skater years ago. It would have been amazing to see him if he had carried it through. Such a beautiful artistic skater. And even at the age of almost 40 he can still do triple toes.
     
  4. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    Thanks! I don't think it sounds like rollerblading will be a problem, then. :)
     
  5. Bonita

    Bonita Active Member

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    I can't rollerblade to save my life (which people dont' get since I'm a figure skater), but I have old-fashioned quad roller skates and love them. They actually improved my figure skating on ice because to me the four wheels were training wheels. I learned a back hydroblade on roller and a shoot the duck (which ultimately gave me a good sit spin). Like I said, not sure about rollerblades, but it can't hurt - it's all about balance on either. Both build balance skills and strength.
     
  6. dbny

    dbny New Member

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    Roller blading should help, especially if you get pic frames. I can always tell when beginners on the ice know how to roller blade; they are the ones who don't toe push.
     
  7. Spazactaz

    Spazactaz New Member

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    No it shouldn't. I've done double axels in my rollerblades even... and it hasn't effected my on ice stuff at all I don't think.
     
    Ozzisk8tr and (deleted member) like this.
  8. mmscfdcsu

    mmscfdcsu Skating Pairs with Drew

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    I wonder how he would have done on ice. :)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aus1PA5-SyI&feature=related
     
  9. briancoogaert

    briancoogaert Well-Known Member

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  10. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Yes, Jayson Sutcliffe is a roller legend. He is the only skater to win worlds on both quad (4 wheel "regular" rollerskates) and on inlines. He can also ice skate. Here is his triple toe on all three. Awesome!! :eek: http://<object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/4TYyRvnSbEY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/4TYyRvnSbEY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385"></embed></object>

    I did inlines. Be careful, there are some differences. On jumps the toe jumps were the closest, but roller skaters tend to slam the toe stop on flips and lutzes and lutzes are much different than on ice (it doesn't really hit a deep outside edge it is what an ice skater would call a flutz.) Edge jumps are also a bit different because, on rollers you can easily slip off the skate if you get too deep an edge. Spins are very, very different. I did a video about this for an ice fiend who wanted to try inlines. (Yes, I spin in the video....eventually. She wanted me to explain the roller entrance to the backspin. It is different than on ice.) http://<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/fo9cNDOExdc?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/fo9cNDOExdc?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

    After skating on both, I think that artistic inlines are close enough to help ice skaters with turns and things like pivots and spirals, (and with endurance and leg strength since it is harder to push against concrete/wood because of the friction), but I do think that the jumps and spins tend to be a little different. Also, some things like flying spins are much different (because roller/inline must salchow the takeoff which is a big no-no on ice.) My advice is that you might want to invest in a pair of PICS or Snow Whites because they are made for artistic with a toe stops in front for jumps etc. These will also catch you if you fall forward on a step etc. I think it would be very hard to do any type of artistic skating (even 3 turns, brackets etc.) on regular inlines because they aren't balanced right. The artistic frames are different. There is a rocker like on ice to balance the skate. I tried regular inlines once and couldn't do very much in them. :(
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2010
  11. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    Wow, amazing triple toe loop video! I'm going to try out some normal inlines before I decide whether to invest in the artistic ones.

    Thanks for the advice! :)
     
  12. Ozzisk8tr

    Ozzisk8tr Well-Known Member

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    I just wrote Jayson and asked him to come on to the board. He would love it here. He is one of the most popular world champions ever as he is still so involved in the sport, including doing a feature documentary on skaters training for the world Championships called "Jesus can't skate".
     
  13. Ozzisk8tr

    Ozzisk8tr Well-Known Member

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    Jayson said get Snow White inline artistic skates, not pic skates. Difference is like first class seats in comparison to economy seats.
     
  14. Wiery

    Wiery Well-Known Member

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    Do artistic inline skaters have more injuries than ice skaters? Just seems like it would hurt more to fall on concrete than ice...I'm actually considering trying the artistic inline skates because there's not an ice rink close to where I live...

    Thanks for all the information, links, and videos!
     
  15. deltask8er

    deltask8er Well-Known Member

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  16. dbny

    dbny New Member

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    The ideal roller surface is an unpainted wooden floor. If you do it outdoors on concrete or macadam, be sure to wear all the protective gear, as that stuff rips your skin right off. Even a wooden floor can give you a nasty "burn", but at least it's fairly clean.
     
  17. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    It's great you want to try inline! :D Ideally, you can find a roller rink that has an artistic club ("artistic" is the roller way of saying "figure skating"), but sadly there aren't very many rinks that have clubs anymore. :( I found an outdoor skatepark, but that was very difficult to skate on because the surface was uncoated concrete. Indoor concrete roller rinks usually have a clear plastic coating that helps the wheels grip, (it also seems to lessen the impact a bit for some reason.) That skatepark was hard! Me doing the 2flip slam into concrete at 2:17. http://<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/oFe1BR1EGr8?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/oFe1BR1EGr8?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object> :eek: Also you have to be careful for skateboarders, ramps, oil used for ramps that gets onto the concrete. Rain, puddles, worms, broken glass etc...

    As for the falls, I don't want to say they are "worse" than ice falls (have seen/done some horrible ice falls), but remember that there is no way for a slide to dissipate the impact so you are getting the full effect of the slam. I think they are harder in this aspect. dbny is right. When I skated artistic everyone always wore pads (that's where I found the bubblewrap trick.) Even the dance skaters! Any fall onto concrete/wood can scrape your skin off. Ouch! At the skatepark I wore bubblewrap pads over my elbows and knees. Also get crash gloves for your hands if possible. My hands got lots of burns. :(

    If you like inlines and are lucky enough to live near an artistic rink there are competitions through the USARS (the official national roller governing body) and inline is offered at Regionals and Nationals. There is even a World Competition. :)

    Inspiration. Jayson (of course). Perfect 3flip inline: http://<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/KhDVKzapULA?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/KhDVKzapULA?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

    Adrian Baturin's 3sal on an uncoated outdoor skatepark. http://<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/ELJ_JULycsg?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/ELJ_JULycsg?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2010
  18. jjane45

    jjane45 New Member

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    It's the other way around for me. After I started ice skating rather seriously, my interest in rollerblading totally evaporated. Rollerblades felt too heavy and clumsy, and imagine what happens when I absent-mindedly try to stop with the non-existent heel.
     
  19. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    (Laughing) :lol: I still go for my toestop and end up catching the pick. :lol:
     
  20. Wiery

    Wiery Well-Known Member

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    Thank you! Yes, I will! I've seen inline skaters' "road rash" in the emergency room and it's nasty stuff!
     
  21. Doubletoe

    Doubletoe Well-Known Member

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    Inline/roller blades are similar to figure skates if you're just doing forward stroking and crossovers, so they are good for building strength and practicing stroking when you don't have ice available. BUT be very careful going backwards or doing mohawks! Stepping down backwards onto a figure skate you'd keep your weight forward on the blade so that the bottom pick digs in and keeps you from slipping. If you do that on roller blades. . . swoosh! BAM!! Hello concrete.
     
  22. Ozzisk8tr

    Ozzisk8tr Well-Known Member

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    When you skate forward the pressure is at the back of the skate (the heel), when you go backwards the pressure/weight is at the front of the foot (the toes). Is that what you mean?
     
  23. Bev Johnston

    Bev Johnston New Member

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    I rollerblade all the time when it's not winter. I find it a good time to practice stroking - pushing all the way through the blade, putting feet back together. I never do crossovers, backward skating, or any other kind of trick. I would probably kill myself. :lol:

    I also kept the rear brake because, while I can do a t-stop, I rollerblade on a concrete trail and blades cannot dig into concrete.
     
  24. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    Thanks for all the advice! I really want to get rollerblades now but I'll definitely be wearing all the knee/elbow/wrist/head protection I can get my hands on!

    Just another question: If I ordered rollerblades online, would it be similar to figure skate sizing in that it would be smaller than street shoe size? Thanks! :D

    Also, does the heel brake get in the way much when you're just doing ordinary stroking?
     
  25. Firefly123

    Firefly123 New Member

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    Bunny Hop,

    I used an old pair of ice boots (Riedell) and had this shop remount them with inline (Snow White) frames. Artistic Inlines will run you anywhere between $75-800 depending on what you want them for. Because I used my regular boot I never needed to know if they run small. But this is a great site SK8gear http://shopskategear.com/

    There is an entry level inline that should be good enough for crossovers/edges etc. It only comes in black, and it says use US men's sizes. Funny, but I have never seen these beginner level skates in white.:confused: See this video. The skater is wearing them. It gives you a good idea at what they are capable of. http://<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/zbpsasgTdEg?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/zbpsasgTdEg?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

    She has very good speed and flow. Nice!:eek: Looks like she had some ice training. But notice the inlines. They are the basic black beginner. So the skates are capable of these types of movements.They seem like they are fine for stoking and lower level jumps. Like ice, the high priced ones are mainly for high level tricks, so don't worry about them. If you have an older pair of ice boots you can just buy the frames and have them mounted (like I did) so you will know that they will fit. If you have any questions click on the link for "Contact US" written across the top of the home page. She is usually very good about getting back to you. :)

    Yes, definitely use lots of pads. And be careful. If you can, skate in a roller rink. (They usually let people do "tricks" in the middle during sessions.) Some outdoor skateparks require helmets (which might not be a bad idea, especially at first). Good luck & have fun!!!!
     
  26. Doubletoe

    Doubletoe Well-Known Member

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    Yes, when skating backward in figure skates, putting your weight further forward (between the ball of the foot and the toes) will actually help save you from falling because you have a toepick. But putting your weight forward while going backward on rollerblades will make you roll right over your front wheel and go down. The biggest danger, IMO, is doing a mohawk in rollerblads--going from a forward edge on one foot to a backward edge on the other.

    Rollerblade sizing is completely different from figure skate sizing. Also, if they are stiff plastic rollerblades, they will never break in and conform to the shape of your foot like leather skates will, so there's no sense in getting them tight/small. The brake doesn't get in the way. You will probably find it very comfortable and easy to use. :)
     
  27. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    Yay! Walked into the second hand shop and there were two identical pairs of inlines. One was size 7, exactly my size. Tried them on and fell in love with them!

    They're very lightly used -- more dusty than scratched. They're called Softecs (I don't think the same as the ice skate brand) -- they feel like sneakers but there's a bit of ankle support. I'll never be able to jump in them or anything, but on the upside there is a fair amount of forward ankle bend, so I won't get unaccustomed to bending my knees. They have 3 lace holes and two hooks, plus a velcro strap over the top of the foot and another one around the ankle.

    I waddled around the second hand shop in them for a while, and have also tried them for about 20 minutes on my pavers. The main difference I noticed, other than the softness thing, is the heat! It gets so hot inside skates when you're outside an ice rink.

    I haven't tried them for long yet, but did a few laps of marching, then step and glide and something vaguely resembling stroking. It's impossible to get a long glide on the bumpy pavers, so I shall have to find a quiet street/carpark. However, the washing on the line was getting in the way, so I'll have more space when I move that.

    Thanks for all the advice! I'll keep everyone updated on my inline skating (mis)adventures. :)
     
  28. Bev Johnston

    Bev Johnston New Member

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    A quick word of advice when you take your new rollerblades out on the open road: Keep your eyes open for sticks, small rocks, and other outdoor debris. These will stop your wheels before you even know why you are sitting on the ground. Also, if you are blading on a trail that has lanes separated by paint (like on the road), stay away from the paint if the pavement is even a little wet. That paint gets very slippery and I've seen many rollerblader and cyclists wipe out!
     
  29. Bunny_Hop

    Bunny_Hop New Member

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    Thanks!

    I swept ("Zambonied") the pavers well before rollerblading. Like skating, I just accept that I'm going to fall sometimes. And I'm wearing lots of padding for rollerblading that I don't have for skating. I'm a bit worried about my tail though (I fractured it as a kid). Could I use a waxel pad/other padding for it?
     
  30. arya arkaim

    arya arkaim New Member

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    i would just use the normal rollerblades for cardio fitness.. an hour in your neighborhood or in the park is great exercise AND FREE. no ice time bills. i tried the roller cages with a rubber pik on toe mounted to old figure boots many years ago.. and it was novel but NOT THE SAME TECHNIQUE.. you are always on the round of the wheels, instead of on an edge.. ROLLERBLADES NOT GOOD FOR TECHNIQUE...BUT GOOD FOR FITNESS.
    easier on joints than jogging