Confessions of a House Snob

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by Civic, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. AliasJohnDoe

    AliasJohnDoe Spin Alissa Spin!!!

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    Ewww....barefeet!!!! The last thing I take off before I shower is my socks. The first thing I put on when I get out is clean socks...even before my undies are put on. I'd rather someone kept their flipflops on before going barefoot....ewww.
  2. El Rey

    El Rey Well-Known Member

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    I have a bunch of friends who moved from Texas to NYC. Sometimes they like to go eat at places like The Olive Garden. They call it "suburban" night. Sometimes they also like to make a suburban weekend and drive out to Wal-Mart :lol:
  3. Rex

    Rex Well-Known Member

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    It gives new meaning to being anal.
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  4. Skate Talker

    Skate Talker Active Member

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    Must be nice for you. For me no choice. I have very high arches and with age they have fallen slightly - enough that I suffered greatly for years. After cortisone shots and much physiotherapy I finally have a handle on it but must wear something with a structured arch at all times to prevent pain. So house shoes it is.

    Back to the original house snob question - well I have fairly low standards but do find some peoples places pretty fugly and depressing. I had a similar problem with my own home but unfortunately although I know what I like when I see it all done really have no ability to put it together myself. I spent many years on indecision trying to figure it out. The living/dining room was the big problem with an L shape, 5 doorways and the need for it to provide access from one end of the house to the other right through the middle. Managed to get one consultant to show up to the house but due to remote location that was her only visit. She came up with an unusable floor plan and other that directing us buy a specific size of sofa and suggesting a list of furniture stores was leaving us to our own devices anyway as far as actual choices. We finally stumbled through on our own and at least it is a big improvement on the old look which was stuck in the 70's and is still usable the way we live in it.
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  5. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    oh, that! :p

    Reading the original post, I was thinking what a non-house-snob I am, but to be honest, I am one. I am snobby about new construction. I hate it. I'll take dusty, I'll take lived in, I'll take clutter...but keep me far away from anything built after 1960, and especially after 2000.

    Of course, there are exceptions. A friend had a house that I absolutely adored, that was built in 2005. It looked like a converted barn, and was quite modern - but not so cold or cheap feeling as most (decidedly UNcheap) new construction is. I couldn't believe it when she told me how new it was. When she moved out of town and sold the house I was in a million depressions - I think I loved that house more than she did! :lol:
  6. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    My college professor called these architects "Pastichio Nuts."

    I hate the newer houses that have at least half a dozen triangles in the roof lines trimmed in white.
  7. Dragonlady

    Dragonlady New Member

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    I'm sure my SIL has all kinds of nasty things to say about me behind my back because they have NEVER been invited to my home. Not once, ever. Every time my SIL goes to someone's house, she makes negative comments about their decor and their furniture. Everything to her is "ugly", out of date, or just plain wrong. And she goes on and on about it.

    I am certain my house won't measure up to her standards. We''re always in the middle of some renovation or another and it takes DH months, sometimes years, to get stuff finished. Our furniture is old and we haven't gotten around to replacing it. But it's clean and comfortable and we're happy.

    I just don't want my SIL running me down behind my back. As for her house: It's nice I guess, if you like beige in every room and vertical blinds on all of the windows. Not my taste at all.
  8. snoopy

    snoopy Team St. Petersburg

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    Do they actually use architects for modern subdivisions? Maybe the really swanky ones but I am surprised the midpriced ones do. They are all so similar. So maybe it was one set of blueprints and 2 million copies.

    IMO, there are a set of post WWII war houses that are the worst. The construction materials might not be bad but the design is terrible inside and out. No balance and no flow. A similar thing happened as in the 90's - rapid expansion from returning war veterans. So throw up the houses NOW. I am not talking about bungalows but the period between bungalows and the 60's ranches. Where the bathroom door opens into the living room.
  9. purple skates

    purple skates Shadow dancing

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    My full bath is off the kitchen. Seriously. I think it originally was the pantry. My now deceased neighbor (which is where I learned how the house looked before that one owner screwed it up) said that when he was a kid in the 30's, the owner of my house put in indoor plumbing for his wife, but refused to use it himself, instead preferring the outhouse. The old outhouse is still on our property, although someone at some point put a floor in it.
  10. oleada

    oleada Well-Known Member

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    Where I come from, its's actually rude to just take your shoes off at someone's house. You need to ask, and even then it's a little weird. My mom is hardly ever barefoot at home - she has a set of flip-flops that are exclusively for inside use.

    But a famous Colombian comedian made a joke about Colombians being pathologically afraid of catching diseases from the floor...what did the floor ever do to us? ;)

    (I, for one, always take my shoes off as soon as I reach my bedroom)
  11. snoopy

    snoopy Team St. Petersburg

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    Well that was updating an oooold house that was built before any modern conveniences existed so the original design was probably fine for the times it was built. I've seen plenty of those pantry conversions - usually to a half bath with the full bath being upstairs on 1940's homes when it was standard to have just one bath in the house.
  12. GarrAarghHrumph

    GarrAarghHrumph I can kill you with my brain

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    When old houses were retrofit to put in indoor toilets and etc., it made sense for plumbing to be near plumbing. Thus bathrooms were frequently placed right off kitchens.
  13. skatingfan5

    skatingfan5 Well-Known Member

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    I've got one of those bathrooms off the kitchen as well -- it couldn't have originally been anything more than a pantry, because I'm sure it's the smallest bathroom in town to have a bathtub in it (it's less than 21 sq ft!). No sign of an outhouse on the property, though. :lol: One of the houses down the block has a garage that is clearly a stable conversion, so you get an idea of what vintage the neighborhood is (mostly pre-WWI). There's only one house that likely would pass Civic's "snob test" -- and it isn't mine. :(

    BTW, I'm one of those shoe-haters and kick them off as soon as I get in the front door. At other's homes, I follow the lead of the host/hostess -- if they are wearing shoes, I'll leave mine on.

    Makes a lot of sense -- that's what my grandmother did when she finally had indoor plumbing put in the farmhouse (built in 1834). I was in 9th grade at the time and remember how glad I was that night-time trips to the outhouse were a thing of the past! :D
  14. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    Since we're going off topic, I sublet an apartment in NY that had a bathroom with two doors - one to the bedroom, and one to the kitchen. Rather handy when getting ready for work in the morning :)
  15. skatingfan5

    skatingfan5 Well-Known Member

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    But you didn't have the bathtub in the kitchen, do you? IIRC, I've read of a few NYC apartments with that unusual feature -- not sure if they were conversions to multi-unit from single-family buildings.
  16. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    No, it was a full, if small, bathroom. I guess it could have been a pantry at some point, but then one does wonder what people did without a toilet in a 5th floor walk up!
  17. skatingfan5

    skatingfan5 Well-Known Member

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    Chamber pots, if the building was old enough. Or very strong bladders to be able to wait until they got to the latrine.
  18. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    In larger pre-war NY apartments, it was really typical to have a tiny WC bathroom off the kitchen with the full bathrooms elsewhere in the apt. I lived in a couple of those - the toilet and plumbing had broken years before so we just used them as broom/mop/cleaning product closets.
  19. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    Since we're going WAY off topic :p, I knew a guy in Cincinnati who lived in a basement apartment whose shower was in his bedroom :lol:
  20. Jenna

    Jenna Well-Known Member

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    Wow. I actually like those restaurants...their food is far better than I could do at home. :shuffle:

    Just so you know, we cater from Boston Market on Thanksgiving. 'Nuff said.
  21. galaxygirl

    galaxygirl Ma name's Beckeh

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    I rarely wear my outdoor shoes inside because my dog's feet and butt are tiny and don't carry as much dirt as my outdoor shoes. I do wear crocs inside though because I have plantar fasciitis.
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2010
  22. bobalina77

    bobalina77 Duck Hunter

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    Did they wear their shoes in the house? lol..
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  23. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    I'm having flashbacks - a few years back we visited relatives in St Petersburg (Russia, not Florida!), and their communist-issued apartment included a closet with toilet with exposed plumbing next to the kitchen sink - can't recall where the shower/tub was!

    Also thinking back to the layout of the apt I rented in NY - it was 1928, with tons of large closets, so now I'm wondering which might have been the WC? Also unusual were the doorways - between foyer/hall and hall/bathroom they were 9-ft doors, but the one into the bedroom was much shorter with no ornamentation - we often wondered what the original layout might have been. Perhaps the bathroom doorway was originally the entrance to the bedroom, maybe a little foyer into it, and then later cut off to form the bathroom ... hmmmm ...
  24. Anita18

    Anita18 Well-Known Member

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    To be fair, I don't think the food is bad at chain restaurants. (Although they are very salty sometimes...) If someone invites me, I'll come along without complaint and enjoy my meal. (And my family is totally getting the Thanksgiving package from Raley's this year. :lol: Although lil sis and I will be baking some things from scratch too.)

    It's just that it's so...ordinary. It's like shopping at a regular mall on vacation - why bother doing something that you can do at home?

    But it depends on where you are, of course. In the boonies, sometimes there aren't a lot of good restaurants around besides the chains. Once, we went to a restaurant attached to a brewery whose beer my bf liked. This was the only place around for miles and miles, and the food was TERRIBLE. Salad was soggy, pork chop was completely flavorless. I don't care for apple sauce yet I was drenching the pork chop in it just so it could have some flavor. (I'm pretty sure it was Mott's apple sauce too.) :lol: Yet it was still pretty popular.

    What makes me :duh: is when people insist on eating at chains (or shudder, fast food) in cities like Paris or NYC or Portland, where I just was. SO many great local haunts that you'd be missing out on! My bf and I didn't eat at any chains the whole week we were in Portland and it was possibly the yummiest week we'd had together. :cheer:
  25. manhn

    manhn Well-Known Member

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    I don't have a problem with chains per se. In Portland, I went to coffeeshops (Stumptown's) and restaurants (Stanford's) that were local chains. As long as it's not anywhere near I live, then I'll enthusiastically try it out. Thus my fascination with Target.

    But as ebayj will attest, I would prefer to avoid anything that I could get at home (*cough*Denny's*cough*) :). But I don't mind the food.

    As for house snobs, as a frequent viewer of House Hunters, if someone tells me that I should have hard wood floors, stainless steel appliances, granite countertops, his/her sinks, and/or a man cave, I may have to punch them.
  26. Japanfan

    Japanfan Well-Known Member

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    Who do you think you're fooling?

    You should have hard wood floors, stainless steel if not platinum appliances, his/her sinks, and at least one man cave - though keep in mind that two man caves is the standard for the have's versus the have not's.

    :revenge: me now.
  27. Twilight1

    Twilight1 Well-Known Member

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    I think it is not necessarily snobbishness on my part, but OCD. I HATE having anything out of place when we have company. I am anal when cleaning my bathrooms. My husband will clean our rec room (using Mr Clean on the summer kitchen island and counters) and I will do it again.

    I have lined towels that I place in an exact manner.

    Canned goods, facing forward. I will coreect it, if my husband does it.

    I guess the only good thing is that I do it when he isn't looking and very luckily, he doesn't pay attention to that stuff.

    My husband and I purchased a home about this time last year and the renovations required is ridiculous. Mr Fix-it (previous owner) was not a Mr Fix it well and we have to redo a lot of his work. We are going to have to go room by room...
  28. Auntie

    Auntie New Member

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    I think you just need to add more salt to your food. ;)

    I thought of this thread last night when my husband was telling a story about one of his coworkers that lives in a small town in Alabama and took a trip to NYC. For dinner they went to TGI Fridays in Times Square. :(
  29. GarrAarghHrumph

    GarrAarghHrumph I can kill you with my brain

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    The house I live in now had a bathroom right off the kitchen. It had been converted from a porch/backdoor area into a bathroom, probably in the 1940s or so. It was a large enough area that when we remodelled, we turned the area into a mudroom/hall (with a new back door exit), with a tiny bathroom off it. It's still a full bathroom, but now it's entered off the mudroom/hall, rather than directly from the kitchen.

    But I've lived in quite a few apartments here in the northeast where the bathroom is directly off the kitchen. It's really common in older homes.
  30. Rock2

    Rock2 New Member

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    It's more of an American thing. It's largely Canadian culture to take your shoes off when you enter a home...especially if you're from some place rural. We have weather issues here so your shoes are rarely clean when you come in.

    When I moved to the US people would just trample all over my place. I finally asked around to see why this was happening and I was told two things. 1. People are self conscious about their feet (smells, sweat, bad socks, etc) and 2. Women especially consider their shoes to be a fashionable extension of their outfit, so it's like chopping their arm off to remove their shoes.

    Asians from what I have found are much more practical, so I was loving the clean environments particularly in Japan when I traveled. So much order in a city like Tokyo with a gazillion people in it. Wow!
  31. Spiralgraph

    Spiralgraph Active Member

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    I keep my shoes on in the house. My reason is simple. My feet get cold easily so wearing shoes keeps me warmer.
  32. professordeb

    professordeb Well-Known Member

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    Count me in as one who must wear her shoes in the house. My orthodics are to correct my walking/rolling on the outside of my foot. If I'm not allowed to keep my shoes on, I head straight for somewhere to sit and rarely leave the spot. Walking without the support in my shoes lead to a lot of pain later. If the people I plan to visit have a problem with me either wearing my shoes indoors OR staying put in one place, I put them on the list of people not to visit again.

    A tidy house ... I wish! I married a messy who has gotten even more messy over the years we have been married. As much as I have tried to deal with it, I still get BSC. He tries ... but not well enough. He'll start something and then not finish it - at least not to the manner in which I am expecting it to look. {{sigh}}
  33. UMBS Go Blue

    UMBS Go Blue KWEEN 2016! YES WE KWAN!

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    Which, from first-hand experience, Japanfan certainly does. ;) :hat1:
  34. Nekatiivi

    Nekatiivi Well-Known Member

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    If someone would try to come to my place, I would tell them to take off the shoes or not to come at all. Smelly feet and ugly shocks happen all time, I it is not so serious.

    I do understand the fear about fungus infections, but if someone has fungus, I assume they will keep shocks or take care of the problem some other way. But I do have to say, I have never heard of anyone having this kind of problem. Maybe they just keep veru quiet about it. :D
  35. Anita18

    Anita18 Well-Known Member

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    I also think that Americans worry a lot about body odor. I must have a terrible sense of smell since it's very rare that I ever notice it, even when my bf is wailing that he's sweaty and smelly. :lol: When he's sweaty I actually like the scent. :eek:

    My ex had toenail fungus and refused to medicate for it because of the liver damage side effect from whatever pill they would give you. :shuffle: It just made one of his toenails ugly, it actually wasn't a big deal and I never got it even though we would go barefoot together and whatnot. I think athlete's foot is a more serious issue in a locker room shower because of the heat and humidity. I don't think you need to worry much about that on a floor where it's cool and dry.
  36. Rex

    Rex Well-Known Member

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    I lurve fireplaces. REAL ones, not non-functioning fireplaces, or worse yet, GAS fireplaces. Ugh. Something you can actually burn wood in. I turned my nose up house-hunting a couple of years ago at these gorgeous McMansions in South Philly, starting at $450K, but they had GAS fireplaces...hmph. The NOIVE.
  37. Dragonlady

    Dragonlady New Member

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    I’m the opposite. I don’t want you to take your shoes off when you come to my house and I certainly don’t want you walking barefoot around the house.

    Feet are sweaty and oily. Walking on hardwood leaves the same kind of greasy smudges on floors that handprints leave on windows, and for carpeting, these oils hold and mix with dust and dirt. Nothing makes your floors and carpeting dirtier than walking around barefoot.

    If you insist on taking off your shoes, please have some slippers handy.
  38. PRlady

    PRlady aspiring tri-national

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    Since plantar fasciitis set in, I wear slippers all the time indoors, I used to go barefoot. Haven't noticed floors staying any cleaner, though. I think shoes vs feet indoors is very personal with a touch of cultural. I wish my cat wouldn't get that blue litter stuck between the pads of his paws, though, that's a pain to clean up.

    I live in a condo built in 2000. It's got shoddy construction in some places, my doors are not solid wood for example. But because I have a corner unit, I have interesting angles in all the rooms, not square boxes, and that was enough to get me past my knowledge that this building is made out of spit and drywall. (That, and the fact we don't have earthquakes and tornadoes in DC.) But for someone else who loves old construction and solid wood everything, this would be a turn-up-your-nose building.

    Chacon a son gout.
  39. Louis

    Louis Tinami 2012

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    I have a beautiful two-story working wood-burning fireplace. Know how many New Yorkers would kill for this? (Me, I am scared to death of fireplaces and always have been. :shuffle: Not sure I will ever use it. No gas in the building, either, so I can't convert it.

    Chacon a son gout, indeed.

    Contractor and engineer tomorrow come to cut three huge holes in my ceiling to determine if the roof can support the weight of a deck. I have a feeling this is the beginning of a long and painful period of renovation during which the apartment will be barely inhabitable for us, much less presentable to guests.

    But a 250-square foot roof terrace is something that I, along with other New Yorkers, WILL kill for (or at least be driven to the point of near-insanity and insolvency for). Crossing my fingers that it's possible.
  40. Prancer

    Prancer Ray Chill Staff Member

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    :huh:

    I think it's more a regional thing. We have plenty of weather issues here, too. I go barefoot in the house all the time and always have. Probably two thirds of the people I know take their shoes off at the door; one third do not. Some of the ones who do wear slippers or socks, some don't.

    Guests, OTOH, are another story. I tend to follow the lead of the hosts. if I go in the door and there's a pile of shoes, I take mine off. If not, I keep them on. And at my house, I encourage people to keep their shoes on because, while my floors are not black, I have a heavy shedder dog and I don't want people to go home with furry feet--which they will.

    I NEVER remove my socks in someone else's house, though. :shuffle: I'd rather have furry feet than plantar warts.